Crm in e commerce1

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Crm in e commerce1

  1. 1. CRM IN E-COMMERCE 1 RAVIMOHAN
  2. 2. POINT –OF – ORDER CUSTOMER SUPPORT ISSUES <ul><li>PRE –ORDER. </li></ul><ul><li>POINT-OF-ORDER. </li></ul><ul><li>POST- ORDER – CUSTOMER – SUPPORT ISSUES. </li></ul>
  3. 3. POINT-OF-ORDER ISSUES <ul><li>CAPTURING THE CUSTOMER. </li></ul><ul><li>DO YOU HAVE ANY AFFINITY TOWARDS THE PRODUCT? </li></ul><ul><li>HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE PRODUCT? </li></ul><ul><li>HOW WELL HAS THE PRODUCT SERVED YOUR SPECIFIC NEEDS? </li></ul>
  4. 4. POINT-OF-ORDER PROCESS <ul><li>ENSURING A SMOOTH ORDERING PROCESS. </li></ul><ul><li>PERSONALISING THE ORDERING PROCESS. </li></ul><ul><li>PROVIDING AN INTUITIVE SITE-NAVIGATION SCHEME. </li></ul><ul><li>PROVIDING PRICING INFORMATION. </li></ul><ul><li>ADDRESSING THE CUSTOMER-SECURITY CONCERNS. </li></ul>
  5. 5. ENSURING A SMOOTH ORDERING PROCESS <ul><li>The scenario is with regards to buying tomatoes and certain ingredients needed for making a cake on your daughter’s birthday and you have to do the shopping before your favourite baseball game starts. You have ample time and you think that it can be completed well in time. But reality turns out to be different. After finishing the shopping , you go the baseball game and you find that the game is in its second half. </li></ul>
  6. 6. ENSURING A SMOOTH ORDERING PROCESS <ul><li>The reason for this is there is only one overworked salesclerk , who does not have the price of tomatoes and hence it takes a long time for him to complete the transaction. Also another problem faced by the customer was with regards to his handwriting on the name to be written in the birthday cake. Hence the net effect is that you are very late for your baseball game due to the inefficiency of the sales clerk. Obviously you will be an unsatisfied customer and you might not recommend others to this store. </li></ul>
  7. 7. PROVIDING SELF-SERVICE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS <ul><li>Let us try to find a solution to the grocery store scenario using a well designed website featuring a CRM strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>If the facility to shop was available online, then all the customer has to do is select the proper size, colour, type and lettering and then he can also select the type of cake by viewing the options given and then he can make the virtual cake himself and then order. </li></ul><ul><li>By doing this entirely online the customer is happy that he can buy from the comfort of his house and the storekeeper is happy that he can serve the customer at his doorstep and keep him satisfied. </li></ul>
  8. 8. COMPONENTS OF A WELL DESIGNED ORDERING PROCESS <ul><li>Keeping the total experience of the customer in mind will remain part of your solution. Despite arguably “obvious” solutions to the type of </li></ul><ul><li>problems faced in the grocery store scenario, </li></ul><ul><li>successful implementation of them can be another story. Remember that your entire CRM strategy must flow together seamlessly, from the internal business processes facilitating your website to the maintenance of customer loyalty after the sale. </li></ul>
  9. 9. MAXIMISING THE ELECTRONIC SHOPPING CART <ul><li>The electronic shopping cart concept has become </li></ul><ul><li>standard across most successful e-commerce websites – and for very good reason. This concept allows customers an easy and interactive method of selecting , reviewing, and ultimately purchasing goods via the web. </li></ul><ul><li>A well designed cart system will allow customers to quickly change items, provide instantaneous price reflections of given changes, and be so intuitive as to seamlessly integrate into the rest of the website. </li></ul><ul><li>By having access to the cart , the option to buy is always present, and customers don’t have to make a mental note of the items they wish to purchase. </li></ul>
  10. 10. MAXIMISING THE ELECTRONIC SHOPPING CART CONTD <ul><li>Customers don’t feel pressured to buy the item. They are more inclined to browse deeper into your product catalogue with the potential of buying multiple items. </li></ul><ul><li>When the customer proceeds to checkout, the functionality provided by the shopping cart should immediately come into focus. You should always provide customers an easy exit from the ordering process, if the customer so desires. </li></ul><ul><li>Full description of the products in the shopping cart should remain available. </li></ul><ul><li>The shopping cart should be fully editable , even in the checkout phase. </li></ul>
  11. 11. PROVIDING COMPLETE PRODUCT INFORMATION <ul><li>Imagine the following scenario. It’s a beautiful early summer weekend, and you are firing up the grill for the first time. However when you reach down to remove the grill top, you notice a huge crack. </li></ul><ul><li>With this scenario in mind , let’s go online to attempt to purchase a new lid from a poorly designed website. </li></ul><ul><li>You have heard an advertisement on the radio that ABC website allows you to place an order online, and then have it shipped directly to your home, or you can reserve it for in-store pickup. The second option is good for as you live very close to the store. </li></ul>
  12. 12. PROVIDING COMPLETE PRODUCT INFORMATION CONTD <ul><li>ABC has a well designed home page with a clean , easy-to-use navigational scheme. Their products have been organised into distinct categories, which makes finding your product easier. </li></ul><ul><li>And then you hit a wall! Though you were able to verify that ABC carries your particular make of grill, it offers no additional information on the specific model. </li></ul><ul><li>Worse still, the original packaging material for your grill is long gone, so you wouldn’t be able to identify the model anyway. </li></ul><ul><li>So the entire effort on your part has gone a waste due non-availability of complete product information in the ABC website. </li></ul>
  13. 13. PERSONALISING THE ORDERING PROCESS <ul><li>If the customer is presented with personalised information upon loading the website into his or her browser, you can create a warm and friendly environment for your patrons, giving them a sense of being the most important customers of your business. </li></ul><ul><li>However, providing personalised service is the need to ensure that the customer’s entire experience on your website is personalised. </li></ul>
  14. 14. EXPLOITING PREVIOUS ORDER HISTORY <ul><li>Though it is true not everyone always shops in the same section of every store, every time they visit that store, it is true that many customers display certain buying habits and patterns. </li></ul><ul><li>It is crucial to enable your website with as much previous purchase information as possible. This includes purchase not only through the web , but also through your physical store, catalogue, phone orders, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>The best CRM implementations are those that integrate your entire business process , thus turning your website into yet another-though not the only-sales outlet. </li></ul>
  15. 15. ALLOW CUSTOMERS TO “OWN YOUR WEBSITE” <ul><li>Customers don’t want to be told what to think, they want to do things on their own. </li></ul><ul><li>However , as the explosion of e-commerce demonstrates, enabling your customers with information can work to your extreme advantage. </li></ul><ul><li>The “website ownership” can be achieved by allowing your customers to personalise your website to suit to their tastes. </li></ul>
  16. 16. PERSONALISATION OF THE WEBSITE <ul><li>As mentioned earlier, provide links to related purchases based on previous sales. This will give your customers the feeling that their buying history is being valued. </li></ul><ul><li>Allow your customers to build their own navigation through your website by allowing them to customise data views. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide them with access to complete information on the product they ordered. It is important to provide them with the ability to quickly ensure compatibility requirements ( size, colour etc). </li></ul><ul><li>Finally , always give them the opportunity to modify the customer profile. </li></ul>
  17. 17. PROVIDING AN INTUTIVE WEBSITE - NAVIGATION SCHEME <ul><li>The ability to quickly find the information you are looking for is the key to any successful website and is critical to the best CRM implementations. </li></ul><ul><li>If your customers cannot easily navigate through your site, they will never get to that great ordering process because they will have found – and ordered –their product from another company. </li></ul><ul><li>Despite the current limitations of access speed , the Web is a visual medium. But you should overload your web pages with unnecessary graphics. </li></ul>
  18. 18. KEEPING YOUR NAVIGATION SCHEME PRODUCT ORIENTED <ul><li>Outstanding site navigation with CRM is far more than having a snazzy drop-down menu. Rather, CRM should focus on navigating around your product. </li></ul><ul><li>What does this mean? </li></ul><ul><li>Navigation should include product information as much as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Information on products should be accessible at any time, from any point in your website. A circular navigation structure should be used. This means that you should provide links to the following on every page: </li></ul>
  19. 19. KEEPING YOUR NAVIGATION SCHEME PRODUCT ORIENTED <ul><ul><li>Your home page. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer’s shopping cart. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Customer’s profile. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By always providing these links at a minimum, your website will possess the basic navigational requirements for quickly linking customers to information they will probably require most. </li></ul>

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