Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Inner-Outer Circle Discussion - Literary Analysis
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Inner-Outer Circle Discussion - Literary Analysis

625
views

Published on

Also known as a Socratic Seminar, the Inner/Outer Circle Discussion is a student-led discussion method designed to encourage students’ open discussion of deeper concepts and practice higher-level …

Also known as a Socratic Seminar, the Inner/Outer Circle Discussion is a student-led discussion method designed to encourage students’ open discussion of deeper concepts and practice higher-level questioning.

Published in: Education, Spiritual

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
625
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Inner/Outer Circle Discussion What is it? (It’s NOT about belly buttons!) Also known as a Socratic Seminar, the Inner/Outer Circle Discussion is a student-led discussion method designed to encourage students’ open discussion of deeper concepts and practice higherlevel questioning.
  • 2. What is the Primary Objective? Through consistent InnerOuter Circle discussions, students are forced to direct their own learning. They decide which parts of the passage to discuss and what path the discussion will follow.
  • 3. Our Goals: •To teach one another about what you find in your reading, •To take risks rather than rely on teacher validation, •To read and evaluate literature orally and on a complex level, •To involve yourself completely in the reading and listening process, •To practice finding and preparing meaningful passages from your text; and, to learn how to take notes effectively from listening.
  • 4. How Does It Work? •Each class member will come to class armed with a set of questions about the selection. (See handout) •The class will be divided into two groups: An inner circle, and an outer circle, and each group will have its own responsibilities.
  • 5. Inner Circle Responsibilities: •The inner circle does the discussing. They direct their conversation to each other, NOT the outer circle. •The discussion is theirs, and covers their own ideas and questions that arise in response to questions offered by the outer circle. •Be prepared to support your responses with examples/quotes from the text! Bring your annotated copy of the text with you to the discussion!
  • 6. Outer Circle Responsibilities: •The outer circle provides the questions for the inner circle to discuss. •When the discussion of the inner circle “finishes” a question, another student tosses out another, and so on. •If there is a lull in conversation, or a question was not addressed to an outer circle member’s satisfaction, they should prompt the inner circle to continue, but… •Outer circle members MUST NOT take part in the discussion!! •As the outer circle listens, they should take notes over the inner circle’s discussion, and write down ideas and commentary.
  • 7. Teacher Responsibilities: •The teacher’s primary role is to monitor and/or evaluate the activity. •The teacher will intervene in the discussion ONLY to refocus the discussion or ask for clarification or extension if a student does not. •The teacher’s role is that of an OBSERVER.
  • 8. Point-Winning Moves 1. 2. 3. 4. Initiating discussion Giving information Asking for information Giving positive or negative reactions to opinions of others 5. Asking for positive or negative reactions to opinions of others 6. Courteously confronting or challenging others’ opinions or incorrect facts 7. Restating another person’s contribution for clarity or to show personal understanding 8. Asking others to restate their contributions 9. Giving or asking for examples 10. Giving or asking for clarification or summary 11. Encouraging, helping, or praising others 12. Relieving group tension
  • 9. Point-Losing Moves 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Being aggressive, disrespectful, or hostile Making self-confessions (i.e. “Well, I didn’t read but…”) Being defensive Competing for attention Refusing to participate Seeking sympathy Pleading for a “pet” idea (i.e. “My idea is better than anyone else’s.”) 8. Dominating the discussion. 9. Mocking or laughing at others.
  • 10. Point-Losing Moves 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Being aggressive, disrespectful, or hostile Making self-confessions (i.e. “Well, I didn’t read but…”) Being defensive Competing for attention Refusing to participate Seeking sympathy Pleading for a “pet” idea (i.e. “My idea is better than anyone else’s.”) 8. Dominating the discussion. 9. Mocking or laughing at others.