Nomenclature  Bonding  Part 2
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Nomenclature Bonding Part 2

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Nomenclature Bonding Part 2 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Nomenclature Naming Compounds Chemical Bonding Part 2
  • 2. Rules for Formulas
    • All atoms must achieve stable electron configuration (full valence)
    • The formula must be electrically neutral
      • The sum of the positive and negative charges must equal zero
  • 3.  
  • 4. Why do we write the metal first?
    • Usually the least electronegative element is written first, followed by the more electronegative element
    • Both in binary covalent and in binary ionic
  • 5. Electronegativity
  • 6. Metals First
    • Metals go first because they are less electronegative than non-metals
  • 7. How do we name our formulas?
    • Name the cation first, then the anion
    • Do not include the numbers in the name
    • Example:
    • BaCl 2 = Barium Chloride
  • 8.  
  • 9. Transition Metals
    • Form more than one type of cation
    • Must use Roman Numerals to distinguish which cation is in the formula
    • Roman Numerals are ONLY used in the NAME, not in the formula
    • The Roman Numeral stands for the charge on the cation, NOT THE SUBSCRIPT in the formula
  • 10.  
  • 11. Formula vs. Name
    • FeN = Iron III Nitride
    • Cu 2 O = Copper I Oxide
    • SnO = Tin II Oxide
    • SnO 2 = Tin IV Oxide
  • 12. How do I figure out what to name it?
  • 13. Polyatomic Ions
    • Ions that are made up of more than one element
    • The elements stay together and act as one unit in chemical reactions
    • Together the elements still carry a charge
  • 14.  
  • 15. How does that work?
    • Na + + PO 4 3- = Na 3 PO 4
    • Mg 2+ + PO 4 3- = Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2
  • 16. How do I figure out what to name it?
  • 17. What do Ionic Compounds look like?
    • Ionic compounds form salts
    • Think of table salt
    • Cations are smaller than the parent atom
    • Anions are bigger than the parent atom
    • The compounds formed become tightly packed spheres of atoms
  • 18. Sizes of Ions
  • 19.  
  • 20. The Positions of the Centers of the atoms (form a matrix)
  • 21. Review
    • Simple Binary Ionic Compounds use the simple names of the ions
    • Transition Metals with more than one charge use Roman Numerals in the name, not in the formula
    • Polyatomic ions use the name of the ion
    • Names and formulas are cation first, then the name of the anion