Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet
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Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet

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Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet

Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet

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Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet Routes - Sensory Therapy Gardens Fact Sheet Document Transcript

  • Sensory Trust information sheetRoutesRoutes should be as accessible as possible.Constraints to improving access includelandscape character, historic significance,public rights of way and limited budget;however the solutions do not alwaysmean large-scale changes to a site. Forexample, they can come from changes inmanagement practices or through improvedsigning, way-marking and information. Identify the most accessible routes andentry points (or ones that could be madethe most accessible through improvements)to help to prioritise improvements. Provide alternative routes that allowgreater accessibility but equal quality ofexperience. Prioritise access improvements alongroutes that lead visitors to the mainfeatures and sensory highlights of your site. Ensure that route design is sympatheticto the landscape and that the surfacematerial used does not impact on local soilsand geology. leaflets and way-marking preferably on- Promote routes that can contribute and off-site.to healthy exercise and act as part of a Paths on routes should be designed to beperson’s recovery from an illness, operation accessible to people with limited mobility,and general health and wellbeing. including wheelchair users, and to those Ensure that information provided on- and with sensory impairments. It is importantoff-site regarding routes is non-judgmental; to consider the aspects outlined below.allow the visitor to decide for themselves These notes are intended as a basic guidewhether or not they are able to use routes and not as detailed specifications. In the UKby giving as much information as possible it is essential that any design conforms toabout the route, its gradient, surface, current Building Regulations.distance and duration. Most visitors understand that it may Width of pathnot be a realistic aim to make all routes 2.0m : room for 2 wheelchairs, or twoaccessible to all visitors. However, they will people, side by side.expect a reasonable balance so that they 1.5m : room for 1 wheelchair pluscan have access to the experience(s) on pedestrian alongside.offer. 1.0m : room for 1 wheelchair with no room Disabled visitors will expect to be able alongside.to have access to information regarding On busy routes, passing places areaccessible routes through the use of maps, particularly important. Where appropriate
  • these may also provide seating. In brief Paths alongside buildings should bedesigned to take account of windows that 1 Prioritise improvements on routes that lead to siteopen outwards. highlightsGradient of paths (see also ramps) 2 Ensure route design is1:15 - recommended maximum gradient. sympathetic to the landscape1:20 - preferred maximum gradient. 3 Ensure information is provided A gradient of 1:12 is the maximum on- and off-site regardinggiven in the British Standards. In practice routesthis gradient is too steep for many people, 4 Ensure routes offer a reasonableparticularly older people and wheelchair balance for all people to accessusers with limited upper body strength. site highlightsWhere possible, aim to exceed thestandards. Gradient and length of slope must beconsidered together. At times, a slightlysteeper gradient over a shorter distancemay be more acceptable than a gentler oneover a long distance. Sustained gradientsof more than 1:20 must be interrupted bylevel resting platforms (approximately 1.8m The Sensory Trust promotes andlong) at maximum intervals of 30m. supports the creation and management of outdoor spaces that can be used andCamber enjoyed by everyone, regardless of age1:50 - recommended maximum or ability.1:100 - preferred maximum Visit www.sensorytrust.org.uk Cambers present difficulties for both or contact:wheelchair users and people with visual Sensory Trust, Watering Lane Nursery,impairments. Pentewan, St.Austell, Cornwall PL26 6BE Tel: +44 (0)1726 222900 Fax: +44 (0)1726 222901 Email: enquiries@sensorytrust.org.uk The Sensory Trust is a registered charity (No. 1020670) and a company limited by guarantee (No. 02811046) Registered Office: Watering Lane