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Nationalism WWII

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  • 1. Nationalism
    Cause of WWII: 1929-1939
    Kirsten Holte
  • 2. 1929
    Rise of the Nazi
    The German Nazi’s offered power. They were racist and nationalist and that was exactly what people wanted. Less people of other religions or races were taking up more jobs and opportunities.
    Nationalism Impacts
    The collapse of the government left a hole for Hitler and his Nazi’s to jump through, I believe the non-existant democracy was the initial reason Hitler came into power. He could completely destroy Communism with the whole nation behind him.
    The Great Depression
    The democratic government was unable to cope with unemployment rates. It led to an overall collapse of German politics.
  • 3. 1930
    Wilhelm Frick
    The first Nazi to become a minister in a state government.
    Nationalism Impacts
    The Nazis took full advantage of Germany’s failing government. They used propaganda to show off their beliefs, because the economy was weak, and everyone needed to believe in something. The Nazis gave them exactly that.
    Reichstag is dissolved
    The Nazi party won 107 seats at an election, the president was unable to pass bills having a minority government. Hitler was now the leader of the second largest party.
  • 4. 1931
    Nazi Brown House
    The official Nazi headquarters was finally opened in Munich
    Nationalism Impacts
    With small businesses shutting down and the Nazis building up, Hitler had a greater influence. He had something stable, that people could believe in with less fear. He blamed the depression on the Treaty of Versailles. This stability brought people together again.
    Banks closed
    Due to the Great Depression, many banks were closed, small businesses failing, and people becoming homeless. They were fearful because the economy was going downhill, fast.
  • 5. 1932
    Hindenburg
    This man was the glue holding the failing democracy together. According to law, and election was to be held, but he was getting too old and was not interested in running again. He was finally convinced, but did nothing to promote himself.
    Nationalism Impacts
    Due to Hindenburg putting essentially no effort into elections and the Nazis doing everything they could, many people took their side. It seemed as though the Nazis really cared about their needs with saying like “Freedom and Bread.” They made the people feel cared for and for the nation.
    Elections
    An election was held and the Nazis went on a propaganda rampage. Hitler made many speeches a day, millions of pamphlets handed out, and posters plastered everywhere. Nazi support went up by the millions.
  • 6. 1933
    More power
    Adolf Hitler is appointed Chancellor of Germany.
    Nationalism Impacts
    The fact that Hitler was now the chancellor of Germany gave him tremendous power. When the enabling act came along people were forced to come together under a ruler once again, and obey.
    Dachau
    The first concentration camp is opened by Munich.
  • 7. 1934
    Hindenburg dies
    August 2nd, von dies and Hitler becomes the Fuhrer.
    Nationalism Impacts
    Now that Hitler was Fuhrer, almost everyone began to trust him. The laws that took rights away from Jews were not thought badly because he was their leader.
    Jew rights taken away
    Jews are banned from the German labor front, getting legal qualifications, and national health insurance.
  • 8. 1935
    More Jewish Laws
    Jews are banned from serving the military, Nuremberg Race Laws against Jews decreed, and abortions are allowed to be forced.
    Nationalism Impacts
    The German nation was coming together more than ever, most people trusted their new leader in all of his decisions. This gave him room to do whatever he pleased, even if it was discriminating against an entire race of people, and his people would still follow.
    Hitler becomes daring
    Hitler notices that his amount of followers is rapidly increasing, and becomes more daring in his decisions and laws.
  • 9. 1936
    Nationalism Impacts
    The Nazis refrained from introducing many laws to the Jews to make themselves look good in the eyes of other countries during the Olympics. This was also a refresher for everyone else, and they were able to believe that the Nazis were not only there for destruction.
    Invasion
    Nazis occupy the Rhineland
    Olympics
    The Olympics begin in Berlin. Hitler gains legitimacy through favorable public opinion by foreign visitors. They temporarily refrain from attacking the Jews.
  • 10. 1937
    Nationalism Impacts
    Everything revolved around the well-being of Germany. The entire nation felt like they were joining for a greater cause. The Jews were beginning to be viewed, slowly, as the enemy. The reason for all the destruction.
    ‘Eternal Jew’
    This travelling exhibition was opened in Munich, accusing Jews of dishonesty, betrayal, etc.
    Hossbach Conference & Alliance
    Hitler met with his foreign policy staff to discuss how to up the German economy. He decided to have a series of small wars. Also, he met with Japanese and British leaders to make alliances.
  • 11. 1938
    Kristallnacht; “The Night of Broken Glass
    A 17 year old Jew had killed a German ambassador, and in retaliation the Nazis launched a massive attack. Burning of homes, churches and murders of Jewish families went on into the morning. Many men were put in concentration camps. To Germans this wasn’t a big deal.
    Nationalism Impacts
    Hitler had the hearts of all German citizens. When he decided to brutally attack Jewish citizens, his nation followed him. Many outside countries recognized the brutality of these attacks and wondered why nothing was happening to stop it. Germany was such a strong nation that even something so inhumane was not considered bad if Hitler led them to it.
    Takedown of Austria
    The Nazis entered Austria, with a population of 200 000 Jewish citizens. Hitler announced Anschluss union with Austria.
  • 12. 1939
    Jewish Rights
    Hitler made many laws in 1939, removing almost every right the Jewish people had. These included; holding government jobs, owning silver and gold, being outside after 8, owning radios, and being forced to wear yellow stars.
    Nationalism Impacts
    Hitler had so much control over the minds of German people, and over different countries. His tactics proved to be successful in gaining everyone's trust.
    Poland Invaded
    The Nazis invaded Poland, which had the largest Jewish population in Europe; 3.35 million. This was the beginning of SS activity there.
  • 13. Top 5 in which Nationalism
    Played the biggest role
    1) The Great Depression
    The democratic government was unable to cope with unemployment rates. It led to an overall collapse of German politics.
    • The Great Depression was the main reason Germany became so nationalist. They all had nothing to believe in anymore, but were searching all the same. It left a gaping hole for Hitler to leap through along with his army. He fed off the massive amounts of unemployment, and peoples low spirits in the governmental situation.
    2) Elections
    An election was held and the Nazis went on a propaganda rampage. Hitler made many speeches a day, millions of pamphlets handed out, and posters plastered everywhere. Nazi support went up by the millions.
    • Elections were a prime advantage for the Nazi’s to capture the minds and hearts of all of Germany. The massive amount of propaganda advertising how all problems could be solved was uplifting. A governer that actually spoke to the public and made an effort to bring the country together as one was exactly what they were searching for.
    3) Olympics
    The Olympics begin in Berlin. Hitler gains legitimacy through favorable public opinion by foreign visitors. They temporarily refrain from attacking the Jews.
    • All of Germany was following Hitler by this time. Most people looked up to Hitler, even worshipped him. He was going beyond regular lengths to make Germany stronger as a nation, and it worked! The Jews were let be, and Germany was rising in influential power.
  • Top 5 in which Nationalism
    Played the biggest role
    4) Poland Invaded
    The Nazis invaded Poland, which had the largest Jewish population in Europe; 3.35 million. This was the beginning of SS activity there.
    • When a nation comes together in such a strong way, they begin to feel powerful. In this case, powerful enough to take down Poland and have it under their own rule. Germany was so nationalized at this time, they felt unstoppable.
    5) Hossbach Conference & Alliance
    Hitler met with his foreign policy staff to discuss how to up the German economy. He decided to have a series of small wars. Also, he met with Japanese and British leaders to make alliances.
    • On top of Germany becoming so nationalized, they began to make connections with other countries. Also grow the economy, which is a huge influence on how powerful a country can be. Other countries began to want to make alliances with Germany because of these things.
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
    http://fcit.usf.edu/HOLOCAUST/timeline/nazirise.htm
    http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/riseofhitler/runs.htm
    Information:
    http://aliqxx.blogspot.com/2010/10/adolf-hitlers-rise-to-power.html
    http://isurvived.org/TOC-I.html
    http://www.historyplace.com/worldwar2/holocaust/timeline.html
    http://stanford.edu
    http://images.businessweek.com/ss/07/04/0426_dow/source/3.htm
    http://andrewvanz.blogspot.com/2011/02/1931-germany.html
    http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/posters2.htm
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