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2005 Energy Policy Act - Regulatory Update:
Tax Deduction Incentive Extended through 2008!


In an effort to conserve the ...
COmpANY NAmE HERE, LOCATION

Recipient Name Here

Recipient Name Here
Tabl Contents
   e of


   1I   NTROduCTION:
            CONTACT INfO – mEET YOuR pROjECT TEAm
            wHO wE ARE. wHA...
This proposal was prepared exclusively for you by
                       The m. Conley Company.
contact Info.
By choosing to work with The m. Conley Company, you have chosen to
work with a team of highly trained and co...
imagination at work.
Reputabl                      e   100 years of success in the making


wHO wE ARE. wHAT wE dO.
The m. Conley Company is a ...
imagination at work.
EpAct                              2005 energy policy act


In an effort to conserve the nation’s energy resources, the u....
imagination at work.
3L’s                 of lighting
ELECTRICITY Is THE BIggEsT CHuNK Of YOuR LIgHTINg COsTs
Averaging across different lamp t...
imagination at work.
Recycl
Reputabl              inge      resource page success in the making
                                   100 years of...
imagination at work.
IRsgui                       dance
THE IRs wILL ACCEpT EITHER Of THE fOLLOwINg mETHOds fOR CApITAL
INvEsTmENTs IN LIgHTINg...
imagination at work.
CRIu                           nderstanding the color rendering index


COLOR RENdERINg INdEx
Color Rendering Index (maxim...
imagination at work.
Learn               green
when buildings are conceived, designed, built and operated with a
view toward minimizing the imp...
imagination at work.
go
go green
     green
LEED and Green Globes are similar programs. Both provide a system
LEEd and green globes are similar...
imagination at work.
Li
lighting
         ghting
Watts times hours used equals energy consumed and money spent.
More light for fewer watts save...
imagination at work.
Certi               fy green
The path to obtaining LEED building certification can be a long and
unfamiliar one — The m. C...
imagination at work.
gl            ossaryof             terms



A
ACCENT LIgHTINg:
directional lighting to emphasize a particular object or dr...
BEAm spREAd (AppROxImATE):
For reflector type lamps. The total angle of the directed beam (in degrees
horizontal or vertic...
gl            ossaryof              terms



C
CAsE QuANTITY OR sTANdARd pACKAgE QuANTITY:
Number of product units packed ...
d
dAYLIgHT LAmp:
A lamp resembling the color of daylight, typically with a color
temperature of 5500 K to 6500K.

dImmABLE...
gl            ossaryof              terms



E
ELECTRONIC BALLAsT:
A short name for a fluorescent high frequency electroni...
fOOT CANdLEs:
A unit of illuminance or light falling onto a surface. It stands for the light
level on a surface one foot f...
gl             ossaryof              terms




H
HIgH INTENsITY dIsCHARgE (HId) LAmp:
A general term for mercury, metal ha...
K
KELvIN:
A unit of temperature starting from absolute zero, parallel to the Celsius (or
Centigrade) scale. 0C is 273K.

K...
gl             ossaryof              terms




LIgHT pOLLuTION:
Light that is directed to areas where it is not needed, an...
p
pAR LAmp:
PAR is an acronym for parabolic aluminized reflector. A PAR lamp, which
may utilize either an incandescent fil...
gl            ossaryof             terms



Q
QuAd:
Generally refers to a compact fluorescent lamp containing 4 U-shaped
t...
s
sELf-BALLAsTEd LAmps:
A discharge lamp with an integral ballasting device allowing the lamp
to be directly connected to ...
gl             ossaryof             terms


TERmINAL TO TERmINAL sTARTINg LAmp vOLTAgE (vRms) (mINImum OR
mAxImum):
The mi...
vEILINg REfLECTION:
Effective reduction in contrast between task and its background
caused by the reflection of light rays...
The m. Conley Company
                               thanks you
          for your time and consideration.




THE m. CONL...
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Energy Policy Act Promotional Materials

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Slides include brochure to solicit relamping business in accordance with the Energy Policy Act, and a sample relamping proposal to earn the business.

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Transcript of "Energy Policy Act Promotional Materials"

  1. 1. 2005 Energy Policy Act - Regulatory Update: Tax Deduction Incentive Extended through 2008! In an effort to conserve the nation’s energy resources, the U. S. Government passed the 2005 Energy Policy Act. This act represents numerous provisions that are beneficial for the economy and the public. The Energy Policy Act will be mandatory and enforceable by 2010. What is the 2005 Energy Policy Act? The 2005 Energy Policy Act regulates and mandates minimum efficiency regulations, incentives for lamps, ballasts and fixtures. What is the benefit to my business? Energy efficiency is a national concern and the 2005 Energy Policy Act gives market-based incentives and solutions to reduce costs and enhance energy efficiency. By updating your lighting systems, you can reduce your overall lighting costs. Plus, you can display your commitment to environmental stewardship by using products which significantly reduce energy consumption. Are there any tax incentives? Yes, there are for commercial buildings. The 2005 Energy Policy Act provides accelerated tax deduction incentives for energy-efficient lighting upgrades completed from 2007 through 2008. How will working with The M. Conley Company benefit me? By selecting to work with The M. Conley Company, you are choosing to work with highly trained and committed professionals who will act as your advocates throughout this process. They will guide you through the upgrade process step-by-step, coordinating all the necessary parties, while giving you the answers you need to accomplish your energy and cost saving goals. Who can I contact for more information? To receive a comprehensive proposal outlining your potential energy savings, contact your M. Conley Company sales representative to schedule a site visit. If you can provide us… [ ] your facility’s lighting/floor plan (or access to draw our own) [ ] your recent utility bills and usage The M. Conley Company will provide you... • A team of qualified professionals • Comprehensive lighting upgrade based on your unique needs • Project timeline • Proposed lighting plan • Detailed spec sheets and warranty info • Cost savings analysis and payback period • Tax deduction info • Service/repair contact info • Existing lamp/ fixture disposal program and replenishment program. Your site visit is scheduled for: imagination at work.
  2. 2. COmpANY NAmE HERE, LOCATION Recipient Name Here Recipient Name Here
  3. 3. Tabl Contents e of 1I NTROduCTION: CONTACT INfO – mEET YOuR pROjECT TEAm wHO wE ARE. wHAT wE dO. 2 ENERgY pOLICY ACT: summARY THE THREE L’s Of LIgHTINg 3 TEsTImONIALs: RETROfIT suCCEss sTORIEs 4 summARY: ExECuTIvE summARY ExECuTIvE summARY suppLEmENT zONE summARIEs 5 REsOuRCEs: REfERRALs RECYCLINg IRs guIdANCE uNdERsTANdINg THE COLOR RENdERINg INdEx LAmp dIspOsAL guIdELINEs 6 gREEN pAgEs gO gREEN LEARN gREEN gREEN LIgHTINg CERTIfY gREEN 7 gLOssARY Of usEfuL TERms 8 wARRANTY INfORmATION
  4. 4. This proposal was prepared exclusively for you by The m. Conley Company.
  5. 5. contact Info. By choosing to work with The m. Conley Company, you have chosen to work with a team of highly trained and committed professionals who will act as your advocates throughout the entire upgrade process. If you have questions or concerns at any time throughout this project, any member of your team can be contacted directly and will respond to you in a timely manner. The m. Conley Company has set up, what is truly, a Turnkey Process. from beginning to end, we will coordinate all necessary parties and guide you, step-by-step, through the upgrade and help you to accomplish your goals. meet your project team: • TEAm LEAdERs Re tem eu faccum dipit alit am, quipit aute tem vendre eu feum dolumsa ndrerostrud magnim zzriliscilit lortinci bla feuipit niam • TEAm AssOCIATE Re tem eu faccum dipit alit am, quipit aute tem vendre eu feum dolumsa ndrerostrud magnim zzriliscilit lortinci bla feuipit niam • RELAmpINg COORdINATOR Re tem eu faccum dipit alit am, quipit aute tem vendre eu feum • ‘gREEN’ CONsuLTANT Re tem eu faccum dipit alit am, quipit aute tem vendre eu feum dolumsa ndrerostrud magnim
  6. 6. imagination at work.
  7. 7. Reputabl e 100 years of success in the making wHO wE ARE. wHAT wE dO. The m. Conley Company is a full service distribution company which provides Industrial packaging, janitorial and sanitation supplies, and food service products for manufacturing facilities, distribution centers, print houses, contract packagers, educational and municipal facilities, health care facilities, food processing plants and contract cleaning services. founded in 1910, The m. Conley Company has provided excellent products and the highest quality service for thousands of customers throughout the united states and internationally. Our company has the capability, know-how, and extensive product offering to provide the most effective solutions to our customers. Being family owned and operated for nearly 100 years eliminates the need for cumbersome layers of management and bureaucracy. All personel and operations of our business are accessible and only a phone call away. This lean and close knit organizational structure enables us to remain nimble and responsive, while anticipating the unique needs of your organization. wE TAKE OuR REpuTATION sERIOusLY. since 1910, we have listened intently to our customers’ needs and concerns and held ourselves accountable to what they have asked of us. Our business has grown along side our customers and our reputation has always been intertwined with their success. We pride ourselves on finding the right product for every application –– Bottom line, every time. Our technical expertise combined with a wide range of product options have helped numerous companies rethink the way they do business, in turn reducing their costs and saving hundreds of hours of unecessary labor. we have forged long–lasting relationships and worked closely with all of our clients. we have worked with “mom–and–pops” to international fortune 500 companies to bring the most cost effective and innovative solutions to their day–to–day business practices.
  8. 8. imagination at work.
  9. 9. EpAct 2005 energy policy act In an effort to conserve the nation’s energy resources, the u. s. government passed the 2005 Energy policy Act. This act represents numerous provisions that are beneficial for the economy and the public. The Energy policy Act will be mandatory and enforceable by 2010. wHAT Is THE 2005 ENERgY pOLICY ACT? The 2005 Energy Policy Act regulates and mandates minimum efficiency regulations, incentives for lamps, ballasts and fixtures. wHAT Is THE BENEfIT TO mY BusINEss? Energy efficiency is a national concern and the 2005 Energy Policy Act gives market-based incentives and solutions to reduce costs and enhance energy efficiency. By updating your lighting systems, you can reduce your overall lighting costs. plus, you can display your commitment to environmental stewardship by using products which significantly reduce energy consumption. ARE THERE ANY TAx INCENTIvEs? Yes, there are for commercial buildings. The 2005 Energy policy Act provides accelerated tax deduction incentives for energy-efficient lighting upgrades completed from 2007 through 2008. HOw wILL wORKINg wITH THE m. CONLEY CO. BENEfIT mE? By selecting to work with The m. Conley Company, you are choosing to work with highly trained and committed professionals who will act as your advocates throughout this process. They will guide you through the upgrade process step-by-step, coordinating all the necessary parties, while giving you the answers you need to accomplish your energy and cost saving goals. DID you KNoW? 80% — 88% Of EvERY dOLLAR YOu spENd ON THE COsT Of LIgHT Is spENT ON ELECTRICITY.
  10. 10. imagination at work.
  11. 11. 3L’s of lighting ELECTRICITY Is THE BIggEsT CHuNK Of YOuR LIgHTINg COsTs Averaging across different lamp types and systems, it is estimated that only $1 of every $25 goes towards lamps, $2 toward labor, and $22 toward electricity! The simplest way to save energy is to retrofit with energy-efficient products and systems from gE Lighting: your #1 energy-saving choice! And remember… every watt reduced in your lighting system results in one- third watt reduction in your A/C load (while A/C is running). REduCE LABOR COsTs wITH pLANNEd mAINTENANCE/gROup RELAmpINg schedule your lighting maintenance instead of simply waiting for lamps to fail! In any large installation, failure rates increase with age in a predictable way. The optimal point for group relamping in typically when 8% to 12% of lamps have failed, usually around two-thirds of their rated life. At this point, both lumen output and lamp color may have deteriorated, yet the cost of electricity remains at “full price”. The per-lamp labor cost of installing new lamps is usually significantly less when an entire site is relamped, compared to the per-lamp labor cost of replacing lamps one at a time. The result? The facility gets a face-lift and the maintenance costs over the next two or three years are generally significantly reduced. Labor 8% Lamps 4% ‘Lectricity 88%
  12. 12. imagination at work.
  13. 13. Recycl Reputabl inge resource page success in the making 100 years of LAmp RECYCLINg wHO wE ARE. wHAT wE dO. for m. most up to date list a companies that recycle lamps by state, The the Conley Company is of full service distribution company which visit www.lamprecycle.org. provides Industrial packaging, janitorial and sanitation supplies, and food many towns and cities offer recycling opportunities at local recycling service products for manufacturing facilities, distribution centers, print centers or transfer stations. state requirements municipal facilities, health houses, contract packagers, educational and and recycling opportunities care facilities, food processing plants and contract cleaning services. vary. founded in 1910, The m. Conley Company has provided excellent Note: Recycling companies at www.lamprecycle.org do not constitute an endorsement the highest quality service for thousands of customers products and or recommendation by The m. Conley Company, gE or Na- tional Emergency management Association (NEmA) of the companies or throughout the united states and internationally. their technologies. persons contacting the listed companies should make HOwown wE dO IT? their dO investigations and determinations about the costs and appropri- ateness of the activities of the listed companies. Our company has the capability, know-how, and extensive product offering to provide the most effective solutions to our customers. Being familyTO REduCE dIspOsAL fEEs? NEEd owned and operated for nearly 100 years eliminates the need for cumbersome layers of management andtests and can be disposed of Ecolux® low mercury products pass TCLp bureaucracy. All personel and operations of our business are accessible and only a phone call away. This without costly hazardous waste fees. lean and close knit organizational structure enables us to remain nimble and responsive, while anticipating the unique needs of your organization. BALLAsT RECYCLINg polychlorinated biphenyls (pCBs) are a group of industrial chemicals that wHY wE’RE BETTER. were widely used before 1979 as insulators in electrical equipment. fluorescent reputation seriously. since 1910, we have listened intently we take ourlamp ballasts manufactured before 1979 often include a to our customers’ needs and concerns and held ourselves accountable capacitor, an electronic device used to store an electrical charge that to what they have asked of us. Our business has grown along side contains pCBs. Note: use and disposal of pCBs is has always been intertwined Environ- our customers and our reputationfederally regulated by the u.s.with their success. We pride ourselves on finding thefor pCB-containing ballasts mental protection Agency, so disposal options right product for every may be limitedBottom line, state, or local regulations. expertise combined application –– by federal, every time. Our technical with a wide range of product options have helped numerous companies pACKAgE RECYCLINg business, in turn reducing their costs and saving rethink the way they do hundreds ofcommercial lighting products are packagedlong–lasting most of our hours of unecessary labor. we have forged in cardboard relationships recycled at recycling centers. our clients. we have worked that can be and worked closely with all of with “mom–and–pops” to international fortuneor “blister pack” to bring some of our packaging includes a plastic shell 500 companies made of the most chloride (PVC). PVC has a SPI solutions to their day–to–day (also polyvinyl cost effective and innovative resin identification code of 3 business practices. container code; it is the number you usually see in- known as the plastic side the recycle triangle, although it may not be stamped on our packag- ing). These packages are accepted by recycling centers that allow this code number.
  14. 14. imagination at work.
  15. 15. IRsgui dance THE IRs wILL ACCEpT EITHER Of THE fOLLOwINg mETHOds fOR CApITAL INvEsTmENTs IN LIgHTINg upgRAdEs. 1 Use simplified interim lighting rules reducing connected watts-per- ft below AsHRAE/IEsNA 90.1 standards. does NOT require energy analysis software, or… 2 use complicated whole building analysis method reducing overall building energy use as determined by dOE approved energy analysis software and certified by follow-up building energy-use audits. Modification of one system must reduce total building energy use by 16- 2/3% as determined by approved software. Approved software posted on dOE website: http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/info/tax_credit_2006.html. wHAT Is A CERTIfICATION LETTER? The Tax preparer needs to have a CERTIFICATION LETTER from a qualified individual. wHO Is A QuALIfIEd INdIvIduAL? A qualified individual is: 1 Not related (does not have an employer/employee relationship) to the taxpayer claiming the deduction; is an engineer or contractor that is properly licensed as a professional engineer or contractor in the jurisdiction in which the building is located; and… 2 Has represented in writing to the taxpayer that he or she has the requisite qualifications to provide the certification required or/and to perform the inspection required. wHAT musT BE INCLudEd ON A CERTIfICATION LETTER? IRs guidance documents detail 9 items that must be included in the letter. This letter must be included with tax documents in case of an audit. NEmA has written a guidance document for engineers and contractors on how to prepare a certification letter for the commercial buildings tax deduction including a sample certification letter when using the simplified lighting rules. This guidance document can be downloaded at: www.lightingtaxdeduction.org
  16. 16. imagination at work.
  17. 17. CRIu nderstanding the color rendering index COLOR RENdERINg INdEx Color Rendering Index (maximum =100) is a measure of how closely the lamp renders colors of objects compared to a standard source. Implied 12000k is that the standard source is ideal, which may not always be true. day- light is considered a standard but then so also is any “Blackbody,” i.e. 7000k any incandescent object, no matter what its temperature. Based on this definition, daylight and all incandescent and halogen sources have CRI’s 4000k of 100. for a warm lamp, CRI is a measure of how close to incandescent color it is; for a very cool lamp it is how close to daylight it is. sources with very distorted colors will have low CRI. In general, the higher the CRI the 3000k more natural the appearance of the source and the richer colors appear. To help indicate how colors will appear under different light sources, a system was devised some years ago that mathematically compares how a light source shifts the location of eight specified pastel colors on a ver- sion of the C.I.E. color space as compared to the same colors lighted by a reference source of the same Color Temperature. If there is no change 2000k in appearance, the source in question is given a CRI of 100 by definition. from 2000K to 5000K, the reference source is the Black Body Radiator and above 5000K, it is an agreed upon form of daylight. An incandescent lamp, virtually by definition, has a Color Rendering Index (CRI) close to 100. This does not mean that an incandescent lamp is a per- fect color rendering light source. It is not. It is very weak in blue, as anyone who has tried to sort out navy blues, royal blues and black under low lev- els of incandescent lighting. On the other hand, outdoor north sky daylight at 7500K is weak in red, so it isn’t a “perfect” color rendering source either. Yet, it also has a CRI of 100 by definition. Cherry Bright Yellowish Bluish Orange Yellow White Red Red White White Hotter = Higher Color Temperature CRI is useful in specifying color if it is used within its limitations. Originally, CRI was developed to compare continuous spectrum sources whose CRI’s were above 90 because below 90 it is possible to have two sources with the same CRI, but which render color very differently. At the same time, the colors lighted by sources whose CRI’s differ by 5 points or more may look the same. Colors viewed under sources with line spectra such as mercury, gE multi-vapor® metal halide or Lucalox® high pressure sodium lamps, may actually look better than their CRI would indicate. However, some exotic fluorescent lamp colors may have very high CRI’s, while sub- stantially distorting some particular object color.
  18. 18. imagination at work.
  19. 19. Learn green when buildings are conceived, designed, built and operated with a view toward minimizing the impact on the environment but also for the people who work and live in them, for the community, the future — and the building owner. Today, many green initiatives in the marketplace offer incentives through certification. LEED ®, the Green Globes ™ program and Energy star ® are the best–known programs. we at The m. Conley Company and gE know that navigating these programs can be challenging, but we can help. The United States Green Building Council, a non–profit organization, comprises more than 7,200 organizations from every segment of the industry. The LEEd green Building Rating system is “a voluntary consensus–based national rating system for developing high performance sustainable buildings”, that “addresses all building types including new construction, commercial interiors, core & shell, operations & maintenance, homes, neighborhoods, and specific applications such as retail, multiple buildings/campuses, schools, healthcare, laboratories and lodging.”1 Green Globes certification, sponsored by the Green Building Initiative™ is a “green management tool that includes an assessment protocol, rating system and guide for integrating environmentally preferable design into commercial buildings. Once complete, it facilitates recognition of the project through third–party verification. It’s an interactive, flexible and affordable approach to environmental design.”2 Energy star, operated by the u.s. Environmental protection Agency, “offers a proven energy management strategy that helps in measuring current energy performance, setting goals, tracking savings, and rewarding improvements. EpA provides an innovative energy performance rating system, which businesses have already used for more than 26,000 buildings across the country. EpA also recognizes top performance buildings with the Energy star.”3 To support these green initiatives, a dedicated group of people at gE Consumer & Industrial develop and produce imaginative products that illuminate and distribute power in energy–efficient and cost–efficient 1 www.usgbc.org way. The m. Conley Company is dedicated to being the company that 2 www.thegbi.com provides you with these products and the knowledge to support them. 3 www.energystar.gov
  20. 20. imagination at work.
  21. 21. go go green green LEED and Green Globes are similar programs. Both provide a system LEEd and green globes are similar programs. Both provide a system in which a project earns points in several areas of sustainability. in which a project earns points in several areas of sustainability. for example, with with LEED certification, in Energy & Atmosphere, one For example, LEED certification, in Energy & Atmosphere, one way to earn up earn up to 10through is through a percentage improvement, way to to 10 points is points a percentage improvement, beyond a baseline,a baseline, in energygreen globes, the building is assessed beyond in energy savings. In savings. In Green Globes, the building byassessed by a points-based questionnaire. Once verified that the is a point–based questionnaire. Once verified by a third party by a building has that the building has received a 35% or higher rating, third party received a 35% or higher rating, certification is awarded. certification is awarded. LEED NC-2 for New Construction and Major Renovation, Version 2.21 Area Possible Points Sustainable Sites 14 Water Efficiency 5 mAKE THIs YOuR fIRsT sTEp TOwARds LEEd CERTIfICATION! Energy & Atmosphere 17 Materials & Resources 13 Indoor Environmental Quality 15 Innovation & Design Process 5 Maximum Possible Points 69 It is the building that earns the recognition, not the products that It is into building that earns the recognition, not the products that go SM go the its construction or operation. Through our ecomagination into its construction or operation. Through our initiatives, innovative initiatives, innovative lighting and electrical distribution products, lighting solutions, and expert consultation, gE and The m. Conley and expert consultation, GE can bolster the efforts of builders Company can bolster the efforts of builders seeking green results and seeking green results and LEED, Green Globes or Energy Star LEEd, green globes or Energy star recognition. recognition. 1 © 2005 by the U. S. Green Building Council.
  22. 22. imagination at work.
  23. 23. Li lighting ghting Watts times hours used equals energy consumed and money spent. More light for fewer watts saves energy, which means fewer natural resources are required equals energy consumed and money discharge watts times hours used for energy generation, power plants spent. less wastefor fewer watts saves energy, you spend less money on more light into the environment, and which means fewer natural electric bills. required for energy generation, power plants discharge resources are less waste into the environment, and you spend less money on electric bills. Consistent with our ecomagination commitment to meet ecological SM challenges with innovative technology, GE has products that reduce gE and The m. Conley Company can provide you with products that the economic and environmental cost of light,of light, compared to compared to standard reduce the economic and environmental cost products, without sacrificing the illumination on whichon which we the standard products, without sacrificing the illumination we all depend. Compact and high efficiency linear fluorescent lamps and all depend. Compact and high efficiency linear fluorescent lamps and UltraMax® and UltraStart® ballasts among our range of choices that ultrmax® and ultrastart® ballasts are are among our range of choices thatenvironmentally preferable to standard lamps and ballasts. are are environmentally preferable to standard lamps and ballasts. Consider this example ofof positive environmental impact: Consider this example positive environmental impact. It compares a 500,000 square foot office building specified with 3-lamp, 2’ x 4’ fixtures, installed on 8’ x 10’ centers, using 4’, 28W, T8 lamps on GE UltraMax® electronic ballasts (normal ballast factor) vs. the same building specified with typical 4’, 32W, T8 lamps on standard electronic ballasts (normal ballast factor). The 28W UltraMax lighting system uses over 17% less energy while delivering nearly the same light output (7,178 lumens vs. 7,392 lumens) as the 32W system. Input Number of Hours Burned per Assumed electricity 6,250 3,500 $.10 Fixtures Year cost per kWh Watts per Fixture Watts per Fixture 87 72 (current system) (Proposed System) Output Energy Savings Energy Savings per 328,125 $32,813 per Year (kWh) Year ($) Positive Environmental Impact of Lighting Upgrade Carbon Dioxide Air Pollution Reduction Air Pollution Reduction (CO2) Emission Equivalence (Acres Equivalence (Numbers 456,750 62 40 Reduction per of Forest Added) of Cars Removed from Year (lbs.) the Road for a Year) Ask your GE representative to calculate exactly how much you can save in dollars and energy, and to calculate the potential pollution reduction of your building.
  24. 24. imagination at work.
  25. 25. Certi fy green The path to obtaining LEED building certification can be a long and unfamiliar one — The m. Conley Company can help you get there. One of The m. Conley Company’s most recent enterprises is the development of its own green division of products and services. This initiative is being headed up by our very own (soon to be) LEEd–EB accredited professional, Holly C. Conley–also, our company founder’s great grand daughter. Our green division will offer you a comprehensive range of products and services that can help you obtain substantial points towards LEED certification. Acting as our resident Environmental Specialist, Holly will guide you through the certification process and act as your advisor when selecting the appropriate green product and maintenance program for your facility.
  26. 26. imagination at work.
  27. 27. gl ossaryof terms A ACCENT LIgHTINg: directional lighting to emphasize a particular object or draw attention to a display item. AmBIENT LIgHTINg: The general lighting present in an area --excluding task lighting and accent lighting, but including general lighting and daylight streaming into the said area. AmpEREs: (“Amps.”) A measure of electrical current. In incandescent lamps, the current is related to voltage and power as follows: watts (power) = volts x Amps (current). ANsI (AmERICAN NATIONAL sTANdARds INsTITuTE): A consensus-based organization which coordinates voluntary standards for the physical, electrical and performance characteristics of lamps, ballasts, luminaires and other lighting and electrical equipment. B BALLAsT: An auxiliary piece of equipment required to start and to properly control the flow of current to gas discharge light sources such as fluorescent and high intensity discharge (HId) lamps. Typically, magnetic ballasts (also called electromagnetic ballasts) contain copper windings on an iron core while electronic ballasts are smaller and more efficient and contain electronic components. BAsE OR sOCKET: The socket is the receptacle connected to the electrical supply; the base is the end of the lamp that fits into the socket. There are many types of bases used in lamps, screw bases being the most common for incandescent and HId lamps, while bipin bases are common for linear fluorescent lamps. BEAm ANgLE: The angular dimension of the cone of light from reflectorized lamps (such as R and pAR types) encompassing the central part of the beam out to the angle where the intensity is 50% of maximum. The beam angle sometimes called “beam spread” is often part of the ordering code for the reflectorized lamps. Example: The 50PAR30/HIR/NFL25 is a 50 watt PAR30 narrow flood lamp with a beam angle of 25 degrees.
  28. 28. BEAm spREAd (AppROxImATE): For reflector type lamps. The total angle of the directed beam (in degrees horizontal or vertical) to where the intensity of the beam falls to 50% or 10% of the maximum candlepower value as indicated. BIAx®: GE trademark for its biaxial family of high-efficiency and long-life compact fluorescent lamps. A straight tube is bent back in the middle, constituting a biaxial tube. BI-pIN: Any base with two metal pins for electrical contact. This is the typical base for a fluorescent tube of 1 to 4 feet in length. It consists of 2 prong contacts which connect into the fixture. Medium bi-pins are used with type T-8 and T-12 tubular fluorescent lamps, and miniature bi-pins are used for tubular T-5 fluorescent lamps. BuLB: A loose way of referring to a lamp. “Bulb” refers to the outer glass bulb containing the light source. BuLB mATERIAL OR COATINg: The type of glass (or quartz) used in the glass envelope surrounding the light source. The material can also have coatings applied to achieve particular performances. BuLB mATERIAL OR COATINg: The type of glass (or quartz) used in the glass envelope surrounding the light source. The material can also have coatings applied to achieve particular performances. BuLB sIzE: Bulb shape followed by its size (the maximum diameter of the bulb expressed in eighths of an inch). for Compact fluorescent products, “s”, “d”, “T”, and “Q” are used to represent single, double, Triple and Quad Biax® sizes. The code also includes a reference such as T4 to represent the size of the tube. Rectangular headlamps are designated as “Rect” and the number of millimeters horizontally. BRIgHTNEss: Brightness can refer to any of several technical terms used in lighting and is, therefore, ambiguous.
  29. 29. gl ossaryof terms C CAsE QuANTITY OR sTANdARd pACKAgE QuANTITY: Number of product units packed in a master case. Also known as standard package Quantity. COLOR RENdERINg INdEx (CRI): An international system used to rate a lamp’s ability to render object colors. The higher the CRI (based upon a 0-100 scale) the richer colors generally appear. CRI ratings of various lamps may be compared, but a numerical comparison is only valid if the lamps are close in color temperature. CRI differences among lamps are not usually significant (visible to the eye) unless the difference is more than 3-5 points. COLOR TEmpERATuRE (CORRELATEd COLOR TEmpERATuRE - CCT): A number indicating the degree of “yellowness” or “blueness” of a white light source. measured in kelvins, CCT represents the temperature an incandescent object (like a filament) must reach to mimic the color of the lamp. Yellowish-white (“warm”) sources, like incandescent lamps, have lower color temperatures in the 2700K-3000K range; white and bluish-white (“cool”) sources, such as cool white (4100K) and natural daylight (6000K), have higher color temperatures. The higher the color temperature the whiter, or bluer, the light will be. COmpACT fLuOREsCENT LAmp (CfL): The general term applied to fluorescent lamps that are single-ended and that have smaller diameter tubes that are bent to form a compact shape. some CfLs have integral ballasts and medium or candelabra screw bases for easy replacement of incandescent lamps. COOL wHITE: A term loosely used to denote a color temperature of around 4100 K. The Cool White (CW) designation is used specifically for T12 and other fluorescent lamps using halophosphors and having a CRI of 62. COsT Of LIgHT: usually refers to the cost of operating and maintaining a lighting system on an ongoing basis. The 88-8-4 rule states that (typically) 88% is the cost of electricity, 8% is labor and only 4% is the cost of lamps.
  30. 30. d dAYLIgHT LAmp: A lamp resembling the color of daylight, typically with a color temperature of 5500 K to 6500K. dImmABLE: whether or not the lamp lumens can be varied while maintaining reliability. dImmER, dImmINg CONTROL: A device used to lower the light output of a source, usually by reducing the wattage it is being operated at. dimming controls are increasing in popularity as energy conserving devices. E EffICACY: A measurement of how effective the light source is in converting electrical energy to lumens of visible light. Expressed in lumens-per-watt (Lpw) this measure gives more weight to the yellow region of the spectrum and less weight to the blue and red region where the eye is not as sensitive. EffICIENCY: The efficiency of a light source is simply the fraction of electrical energy converted to light, i.e. watts of visible light produced for each watt of electrical power with no concern about the wavelength where the energy is being radiated. for example, a 100 watt incandescent lamp converts 7% of the electrical energy into light; discharge lamps convert 25% to 40% into light. ELECTROmAgNETIC BALLAsT (mAgNETIC BALLAsT): A ballast used with discharge lamps that consists primarily of transformer- like copper windings on a steel or iron core. Also called “Core and Coil”. ELECTROmAgNETIC spECTRum: A continuum of electric and magnetic radiation that can be characterized by wavelength or frequency. visible light encompasses a small part of the electromagnetic spectrum in the region from about 380 nanometers (violet) to 770 nanometers (red) by wavelength.
  31. 31. gl ossaryof terms E ELECTRONIC BALLAsT: A short name for a fluorescent high frequency electronic ballast. Electronic ballasts use solid state electronic components and typically operate fluorescent lamps at frequencies in the range of 25-35 kHz. The benefits are: increased lamp efficacy, reduced ballast losses and lighter, smaller ballasts compared to electromagnetic ballasts. Electronic ballasts may also be used with HId (high intensity discharge) lamps. ENERgY pOLICY ACT (EpACT): Comprehensive energy legislation passed by the u. s. Congress in 1992. The lighting portion includes lamp labeling and minimum energy efficacy (lumens/watt) requirements for many commonly used incandescent and fluorescent lamp types. Federal Canadian legislation sets similar minimum energy efficacy requirements for incandescent reflector lamps and common linear fluorescent lamps. f fIELd ANgLE: The angular dimension of the cone of light from reflectorized lamps (such as R and pAR types) encompassing the central part of the beam out to the angle where the intensity is 10% of maximum. fILAmENT: metal tungsten wire heated by the passage of electrical current, used to emit light in incandescent lamps. In fluorescent lamps the filament is coated with emission mix and emits electrons when heated. fLOOd: Used to refer to the beam pattern of a reflector lamp, which disperses the light over a wide beam angle, typically 20 degrees or more. (“flood” as opposed to “spot”). fLOOdLIgHT: A luminaire used to light a scene or object to a level much brighter than its surroundings. Usually floodlights can be aimed at the object or area of interest. fLuOREsCENT LAmp: A high efficiency lamp utilizing an electric discharge through inert gas and low pressure mercury vapor to produce ultraviolet (uv) energy. The uv excites phosphor materials applied as a thin layer on the inside of a glass tube which makes up the structure of the lamp. The phosphors transform the uv to visible light.
  32. 32. fOOT CANdLEs: A unit of illuminance or light falling onto a surface. It stands for the light level on a surface one foot from a standard candle. One footcandle is equal to one lumen per square foot. fOuR-pIN COmpACT fLuOREsCENT LAmps: A “plug-in” compact fluorescent lamp with 4 pins in the base to make electrical contact with the ballast. fuLL spECTRum LIgHTINg: A marketing term, typically associated with light sources that are similar to some forms of natural daylight (5000K and above, 90+ CRI), but sometimes more broadly used for lamps that have a smooth and continuous color spectrum. g gLARE: visual discomfort caused by excessive brightness is called discomfort glare. If task performance is affected it is called disability glare. glare can be direct glare or indirect (reflected) glare. H HALOgEN LAmp: A halogen lamp is an incandescent lamp with a filament that is surrounded by halogen gases, such as iodine or bromine. Halogen gases allow the filaments to be operated at higher temperatures and higher efficacies. The halogen participates in a tungsten transport cycle, returning tungsten to the filament and prolonging lamp life. HALOgEN-IR (HIR) LAmp: GE designation for high-efficiency tungsten halogen lamps. HIR lamps utilize shaped filament tubes coated with numerous layers of materials that transmit light but reflect the heat (infrared) back into the filament. This reduces the power needed to keep the filament hot. HIgH EffICIENCY (ENERgY sAvINg) ELECTROmAgNETIC BALLAsT: Ballast with core & coils, designed to minimize ballast losses compared to the “standard” ballast.
  33. 33. gl ossaryof terms H HIgH INTENsITY dIsCHARgE (HId) LAmp: A general term for mercury, metal halide (gE ConstantColor® CmH®, multi-vapor®, mxR or Arcstream®) and high-pressure sodium (gE Lucalox®) lamps. HId lamps contain compact arc tubes which enclose mercury and various gases with other chemicals and operate at relatively high pressures and temperatures. HIgH pOwER fACTOR: A ballast whose power factor is corrected to 90% or greater by the use of a capacitor. HIgH-pREssuRE sOdIum (Hps) LAmp: Hps lamps are high intensity discharge light sources that product light by an electrical discharge though sodium vapor operating at relatively high pressures and temperatures. gE markets these lamps under the trade name of Lucalox®. I I-LINE: A gE designation for a family of metal halide lamps which will operate on a mercury ballast. Designed as a simple retrofit for mercury lamp. ILLumINANCE: The “density” of light (lumens/area) incident on a surface; i.e. the light level on a surface. Illuminance is measured in footcandles or lux. INCANdEsCENT LAmp: A light source that generates light utilizing a thin filament wire (usually of tungsten) heated to white heat by an electric current passing through it. INdIRECT LIgHTINg: The method of lighting a space by directing the light from luminaires upwards towards the ceiling. The light scattered off the ceiling produces a soft, diffuse illumination for the entire area.
  34. 34. K KELvIN: A unit of temperature starting from absolute zero, parallel to the Celsius (or Centigrade) scale. 0C is 273K. KILOwATT (Kw): The measure of electrical power equal to 1000 watts.. KILOwATT HOuR (KwH): The standard measure of electrical energy and the typical billing unit used by electrical utilities for electricity use. A 100-watt lamp operated for 10 hours consumes 1000 watt-hours (100 x 10) or one kilowatt-hour. If the utility charges $.10/kwh, then the electricity cost for the 10 hours of operation would be 10 cents (1 x $.10). L LAmp: The term used to refer to the complete light source package, including the inner parts as well a the outer bulb or tube. “Lamp”, of course, is also commonly used to refer to a type of small light fixture such as a table lamp. LAmp dEsCRIpTION: The lamp’s identification code. For Projection lamps, this is a 3-letter- number code uniquely identifying the lamp for ordering purposes. In some instances, lamps with 3-letter (ANsI) codes are offered in more than one design voltage, in which case the voltage required should also be specified when ordering. Some GE Projection lamps have an ordering code comprising of two or more 3-letter ANsI codes - such as Em/EKs and DYS/DYV/BHC. The first code is the ANSI code, the secondary codes identify which lamp the multiple-coded lamp can directly replace. Only the first code appears on the lamp itself. Multiple-coded lamps are so- designated by general Electric for the convenience of the customer. In nearly all cases, miniature and sealed Beam lamps are marked with a general Electric Trade number recorded with ANsI. LAmp TYpEs: filament lamps: Incandescent, Halogen, Halogen-IR. discharge Lamps: fluorescent, HId (High Intensity discharge) HId Lamps: mercury, Hps (High pressure sodium), mH (metal Halide) and CmH (Ceramic metal Halide).
  35. 35. gl ossaryof terms LIgHT pOLLuTION: Light that is directed to areas where it is not needed, and thereby interferes with some visual act. Light pollution directed or reflected into the sky creates a “dome” of wasted light and makes it difficult to see stars above cities. LumENs: A measure of the luminous flux or quantity of light emitted by a source. For example, a dinner candle provides about 12 lumens. A 60-watt soft white incandescent lamp provides about 840 lumens. LumINANCE: A measure of “surface brightness” when an observer is looking in the direction of the surface. It is measured in candelas per square meter (or per square foot) and was formerly referred to as “photometric brightness.” Lux (Lx): A unit of illuminance or light falling onto a surface. One lux is equal to one lumen per square meter. Ten lux approximately equals one footcandle. m mERCuRY LAmp: A high-intensity discharge light source operating at a relatively high pressure (about 1 atmosphere) and temperature in which most of the light is produced by radiation from excited mercury vapor. phosphor coatings on some lamp types add additional light and improve color rendering. mETAL HALIdE LAmp: A high intensity discharge light source in which the light is produced by the radiation from mercury, plus halides of metals such as sodium, scandium, indium and dysprosium. some lamp types may also utilize phosphor coatings. gE trade names include: multi-vapor®, ConstantColor® CmH®, pulseArc®, staybright®, watt-miser®, Chromafit and Arcstream®. N NATIONAL ELECTRIC COdE (NEC): A nationally accepted electrical installation code to reduce the risk of fire, developed by the National fire protection Association. NATIONAL ENERgY sTANdARds fOR fLuOREsCENT BALLAsTs: A federal law enacted in 1988 that sets energy standards for ballasts consistent throughout the united states.
  36. 36. p pAR LAmp: PAR is an acronym for parabolic aluminized reflector. A PAR lamp, which may utilize either an incandescent filament, a halogen filament tube or a HID arc tube, is a precision pressed-glass reflector lamp. PAR lamps rely on both the internal reflector and prisms in the lens for control of the light beam. pCB (pOLYCHLORINATEd BIpHENYLs): Chemical pollutant formerly used in ballast capacitors that were part of ballasts. It is now illegal to use pCB’s and most of such ballasts have been replaced over time. pHOspHOR: An inorganic chemical compound processed into a powder and deposited on the inner glass surface of fluorescent tubes and some mercury and metal-halide lamp bulbs. phosphors are designed to absorb short wavelength ultraviolet radiation and to transform and emit it as visible light. pCB (pOLYCHLORINATEd BIpHENYLs): Chemical pollutant formerly used in ballast capacitors that were part of ballasts. It is now illegal to use pCB’s and most such ballasts have been replaced over time. pROduCT COdE: It is important to use this five-digit code when ordering to ensure that you receive the exact product you require. pROgRAmmEd RApId sTART: Lamp starting method which preheats the lamp filaments while not allowing the lamp to ignite and then applies the open circuit voltage (OCv) to start the lamp. The user may experience a half- to one-second delay after turning on the lamps while the pre-heating takes place. This type of starting circuit keeps lamp end blackening to a minimum and improves lamp life performance, especially in applications where the lamps are frequently switched on and off. puLsE sTART: An HId ballast with a high voltage ignitor to start the lamp.
  37. 37. gl ossaryof terms Q QuAd: Generally refers to a compact fluorescent lamp containing 4 U-shaped tubes, i.e. Quad Biax®, as opposed to Triple Biax® (3 tubes) and double Biax® (2-tubes). R RApId sTART CIRCuIT: A fluorescent lamp-ballast circuit that utilizes continuous cathode heating, while the system is energized, to start and maintain lamp light output at efficient levels. Rapid start ballasts may be either electromagnetic, electronic or of hybrid designs. Full-range fluorescent lamp dimming is only possible with rapid start systems. RApId sTART: Lamp starting method in which lamp filaments are heated while open circuit voltage (OCv) is applied to facilitate lamp ignition. RApId sTART LAmp: A fluorescent lamp with two pins at each end connected to the filament. The filaments are heated by the ballast to aid in starting. Some rapid start lamps may be instant started without filament heat, for example, the f32T8 lamp. RATEd LAmp LIfE: for most lamp types, rated lamp life is the length of time of a statistically large sample between first use and the point when 50% of the lamps have died. It is possible to define “useful life” of a lamp based on practical considerations involving lumen depreciation and color shift. REfLECTANCE: The ratio of light reflected from a surface to that incident upon it. REfLECTOR LAmp (R): A light source with a built-in reflecting surface. Sometimes, the term is used to refer specifically to blown bulbs like the R and ER lamps; at other times, it includes all reflectorized lamps like PAR and MR.
  38. 38. s sELf-BALLAsTEd LAmps: A discharge lamp with an integral ballasting device allowing the lamp to be directly connected to a socket providing line voltage. spACINg TO mOuNTINg HEIgHT RATIO: Ratio of fixture spacing (distance apart) to mounting height above the work plane; sometimes called spacing criterion. It is OK to have fixture spaced closer than the spacing criterion suggested by the manufacturer but not farther, or you will get dark spots in-between fixtures. spOT: A colloquial term referring to a reflector lamp with a tight beam of light, typically around 10 degrees or less. It comes from the fact that such a lamp produces a narrow spot of light as opposed to a wide flood of light. sTARTER: An electronic module or device used to assist in starting a discharge lamp, typically by providing a high-voltage surge. sTARTINg TEmpERATuRE (mINImum): The minimum ambient temperature at which the lamp will start reliably. sYsTEm: A term referring to the lamp and ballast combination, and sometimes to the entire lighting delivery system including the fixture, the optics, the particular layout and the lighting controls. T T-12, T-8, T-5: A designation for the diameter of a tubular bulb in eighths of an inch; T-12 is 12 eighths of an inch, or 11/2 inches; T-8 is 1 inch, and so on. TAsK LIgHTINg: supplemental lighting provided to assist in performing a localized task, e.g. a table lamp for reading or an inspection lamp for fabric inspection.
  39. 39. gl ossaryof terms TERmINAL TO TERmINAL sTARTINg LAmp vOLTAgE (vRms) (mINImum OR mAxImum): The minimum or maximum allowed voltage allowed into lamp from ballast under varying conditions as specified. TwO-pIN COmpACT fLuOREsCENT LAmps: Type of lamps that have the glow bottle starter built into the base of the lamp. Traditionally 2-pin lamps are designed to work with electromagnetic ballasts. u uNdERwRITERs’ LABORATORIEs (uL): A private organization which tests and lists electrical (and other) equipment for electrical and fire safety according to recognized uL and other standards. A uL listing is not an indication of overall performance. Lamps are not UL listed except for compact fluorescent lamp assemblies - those with screw bases and built-in ballasts. uLTRA: A common way of referring to high efficiency GE T8 family of lamps that perform better than standard T8 lamps. uLTRAvIOLET (uv) RAdIATION: Radiant energy in the range of about 100-380 nanometers (nm). for practical applications, the uv band is broken down further as follows: * Ozone-producing - 180-220 nm * Bactericidal (germicidal) - 220-300 * Erythemal (skin reddening) - 280-320 * “Black” light - 320-400 The International Commission on Illumination (CIE) defines the UV band as uv-A (315-400 nm); uv-B (280-315 nm) and uv-C (100-280 mm). v vALANCE LIgHTINg: Lighting from light sources on a wall typically above eye level, shielded by horizontal panels. The light may be upward or downward directed.
  40. 40. vEILINg REfLECTION: Effective reduction in contrast between task and its background caused by the reflection of light rays; sometimes called “reflected glare.” You might have dealt with veiling reflections when you have to tilt a shiny magazine to avoid glare so as to read it, or struggled with reading a computer monitor because of the reflection of a window or a light fixture. vIsuAL TAsK: The task associated with seeing; objects and details that must be seen to perform an activity. vOLT: A measure of “electrical pressure” between two points. The higher the voltage, the more current will be pushed through a resistor connected across the points. The volt specification of an incandescent lamp is the electrical “pressure” required to drive it at its designed point. The “voltage” of a ballast (e.g. 277 v) refers to the line voltage it must be connected to. vOLTAgE: A measurement of the electromotive force in an electrical circuit or device expressed in volts. voltage can be thought of as being analogous to the pressure in a waterline. w wARm wHITE: Refers to a color temperature around 3000K, providing a yellowish- white light. wATTs: A unit of electrical power. Lamps are rated in watts to indicate the rate at which they consume energy. wORK pLANE: Plane at which work is done and at which illumination is specified and measured; unless otherwise indicated, it is assumed to be a horizontal plane 30 inches above the floor (table-top height) having the same area as the floor.
  41. 41. The m. Conley Company thanks you for your time and consideration. THE m. CONLEY COmpANY • CORpORATE HQ • 1312 fOuRTH sTREET sE, CANTON, OHIO 44707 • 330.456.8243 • 800.362.6001
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