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GCU presentaiton

GCU presentaiton

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  • Graphic Novel= A novel with graphics or images. When most people hear Graphic Novels They think comic books. Superheroes come to mind like batman or wonder woman. Also, Comic Books are usually a series- with new stories coming out each month and Graphic Novels are one story, sometimes told through multiple volumes and that come to an end. Discuss Manga.
  • Comic and graphic novels are told via same format- Sequential art (combo of text, panels, & images)
  • GNs can teach about making inferences since readers must rely on pics and just a small amount of text. Inferences-reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical jusgement on the basis of cirumsantial evidence prior conclusion.
  • A way to transition from Graphic Novels to Chapter Books. Another Stepping Stone.
  • Google “Graphic Novel Lesson Plans”
  • Discuss Manga. Google “Graphic Novel Lesson Plans”

Gn Gn Presentation Transcript

  • GRAPHIC NOVELS IN THECLASSROOM
  • COMICS VS. GRAPHICNOVELSWhat is the difference between a comic book and a graphic novel?LengthTypes
  • PARTS OF A GRAPHIC NOVEL Panels- Boxes where the pictures and words appear. Panels read in a sequence (often left to right). Told through Sequential Art (combo of text, panels and images)
  • PARTS OF A GRAPHIC NOVEL (CONT’D) GN’s are like chapter books they have plot, characters, etc. Dialogue
  • PARTS OF A GRAPHIC NOVEL(CONT’D) Captions
  • TEACHING, PARAGRAPHING,&OUTLINING
  • BRIDGING THE GAP“Graphic novels can be used as a point of reference to bridge what students already know with what they have yet to learn.”http://www.ncte.org/magazine/archives/122031
  • WORDLESS GRAPHIC NOVELS
  • TEMPTING RELUCTANT READERS &ENCOURAGING UNMOTIVATED READERS
  • GREAT FOR ESLSTUDENTS AND RELUCTANT READERS
  • MERGING OF GRAPHIC NOVELS AND CHAPTER BOOKS BOOKS THAT USE BOTH TEXT AND GRAPHIC NOVEL FORMAT TO TELL A STORY GREAT FOR RELUCTANT READERS LOW LEVEL-HIGH INTEREST Diary of a Wimpy Kid Captain Underpants Stink Amelia’s Notebook
  • MAKE BELIEFS COMIX Make Beliefs Comix is a fun and easy website that you can use in the classroom or as an assignment with kids to make their own comics. Offers a teachers resource page Great for ESL-Offered in several languages www.makebeliefscomix.com
  • EDUCATIONAL PUBLISHERS A GOOD NON-FICTION GRAPHIC NOVEL SHOULD HAVE: Background information Glossary Table of contents Additional resources such as discussion questions Bibliographies, websites, and writing prompts The purpose of the book is to inform the learner about curriculum-based or content-based topics, using the graphic novel format to present the information.
  • EXCEPTIONAL PUBLISHERS  Capstone Press offers the Graphic Library line of books  Elementary and Middle School
  • EXCEPTIONAL PUBLISHERS Stone Arch Books is a sister company of Capstone. Currently, they offer five series: * Graphic Quest * Graphic Revolve * Graphic Sparks * Graphic Trax * Ridge Riders
  • EXCEPTIONAL PUBLISHERS Rosen Publishing NY publishes six series of nonfiction that are all suitable for elementary and middle school readers:Graphic Civil War Battles, Graphic Mysteries,Graphic Mythology, Graphic Nonfiction Biographies,Jr.Graphic Mysteries, Jr. Graphic Mythologies
  • GUIDELINES FOR SELECTION1. Does the art support the text? Does the art assist the reader?2. Do the colors support the text and storyline or do they conflict with each other?3. Are the word balloons, thought bubbles, and captions placed correctly and in a fashion that is logical?4. If it is a nonfiction graphic novel, are the facts reliable and accurate?5. Does the book offer students additional information about the topic in the form of Web sites, references, maps, and suggested other readings (when applicable)?6. By using these questions, educators can develop a sense of what is valuable for the classroomhttp://www.forewordmagazine.net/articles/shw_article.aspx?articleid=187
  • EDUCATE YOURSELF ON COMICS
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY: Graphic Novels: A Bibliographic Guide to Book-Length Comics by D. Aviva Rothschild (1995, Libraries Unlimited). This guide reviews over 400 graphic novels. Cartoons and Comics in the Classroom: A Reference for Teachers and Librarians (1983, Libraries Unlimited). This book may be a bit dated, but it includes practical teaching suggestions across the curriculum. The 101 Best Graphic Novels by Stephen Weiner; Keith R.A. Decandido, editor (2001, NBM). This excellent resource describes 101 graphic novels and rates them for age appropriateness. It also offers a short history of graphic novels and a bibliography. Bang, Molly. Picture This: How Pictures Work. SeaStar Books, 2000. Cray, Stephen. Going Graphic: Comics at Work in the Multilingual Classroom. Heinemann, 2004. Lyga, Alysson. Supplement Feature: Bringing Graphic Novels into the Classroom.http://www.forewordmagazine.net/articles/shw_article.aspx? articleid=187
  • FURTHER READING Perceptions and Use of Graphic Novels in the Classroom (2009) Raechel B. Callahan http://www.cehs.ohio.edu/resources/documents/callahan.pdf Implementing Graphic Texts into the Language Arts Classroom (Minnesota English Journal 2008) Doug Annett http://www.mcte.org/journal/mej08/Annet.pdf