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Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
Personality
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Personality

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  • Definition from Myers (1998, p.420) Personality is an abstract concept, like intelligence, that cannot be -seen, touched or directly measured Personality is one’s relatively distinctive and consistent pattern of thinking, feeling, and acting Each dwarf has a distinct type of personality
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    • 1. Personality
    • 2. What is Personality?
      • When we talk of personality, we don’t mean that a person has charm, a positive attitude toward life, a smiling face.
      • When psychologists talk of personality, they mean a dynamic concept describing the growth and development of a person’s whole psychological system.
      • Rather than looking at parts of the person, personality looks at some aggregate whole that is greater than the sum of the parts.
    • 3.
      • “ An individual’s characteristic pattern of
      • thinking, feeling, and acting.”
      What is Personality?
    • 4. What is Personality?
      • Personality refers to the structures and propensities inside a person that explain his or her characteristic patterns of thought, emotion, and behavior.
      • In General , the sum total of ways in which an individual reacts and interacts with each others.
    • 5. MAJOR DETERMINANTS OF PERSONALITY
      • I. Biological Contributions:
      • The role of heredity.
      • Managerial thinking.
      • Split-brain thinking.
      • Biofeedback.
      • Physical characteristics and rate of maturing.
    • 6. MAJOR DETERMINANTS OF PERSONALITY
      • II. Cultural Contributions
      • Cultural values & norms
      • III. Contributions from the Family.
      • Parental influence.
    • 7. Personality Determinants
        • Is personality genetically determined, or is it formed by experience?
        • Heredity sets the limits on the development of personality characteristics.
        • Environment determines development within these limits.
        • Across all characteristics there is about a 50-50 heredity-environment split.
    • 8. Personality Traits
      • Personality is:
      • the dynamic organisation of traits.
      • Trait:
      • “ a characteristic pattern that describe an individual’s behaviour”
    • 9. Personality Traits
      • Identifies the degree to which several different personality characteristics occur within an individual
      • It can be said as consistent ways of behaving (traits) e.g.,
      • Honest
      • Dependable
      • Moody
      • Impulsive
    • 10. Myers-Briggs Dichotomies
      • Four dichotomies
        • Extraversion / Introversion (E/I)
        • Sensing / Intuition (S/N)
        • Thinking / Feeling (T/F)
        • Judging / Perceiving (J/P)
    • 11. Extraversion
      • More interested in the external world of people and things
      • They derive meaning from connections with the external environment
      • They maximize interactions
      • Sociable, Energetic, Adventurous
        • Enthusiastic, Outgoing
    • 12. Introversion
      • Interested more in the internal world of ideas and concepts
      • Enjoy solitude and introspection
      • P refer to focus on one thing at a time
      • Listen more than talk
      • Feel comfortable being alone
      • Are self-contained & reserved
    • 13. Sensing
      • A tendency to perceive by relying on observable facts or happenings through the senses
      • A dmire practical solutions
      • N otice details and remember facts
      • Trust actual experience
      • Like step-by-step instructions
      • L ive in the here-and-now
    • 14. Intuition
      • Emphasizes concepts, theories, relationships and possibilities
      • Values inspiration
      • Admire creative ideas
      • Prefer to learn new skills
      • Focus on the
      • big picture & possibilities
      • Notice anything new or different
    • 15. Thinking
      • Make decisions in an objective, logical, and analytical manner
      • These people evaluate ideas and data objectively
      • Argue or debate issues for fun
      • Are motivated by achievement
      • Value honesty and fairness
      • Appear cool and reserved
    • 16. Feeling
      • They emphasize the effect the decision will have on people and interpersonal relationships
      • Decide based on their values & feelings
      • Are diplomatic and tactful
      • Avoid arguments and conflicts
      • Are most convinced by how they feel
    • 17.
      • Prefer a structured, scheduled, and planned.
      • Tend to be organized, deliberate and capable of making decisions with a minimum of stress.
      • Make most decisions pretty easily .
      • They are usually scheduled, develop fixed ideas of how things should be done.
      Judging
    • 18. Perceiving
      • Prefer a flexible, spontaneous and adaptive environment.
      • They tend to continue to collect information rather then make a decision.
      • Play first, work later .
      • May have difficulty making decisions
      • Want the freedom to be spontaneous
    • 19. Myers-Briggs 16 Primary Traits
    • 20. The “Big Five” Personality Traits
      • Openness to Experience
      • Conscientiousness
      • Extraversion
      • Agreeableness
      • Neuroticism
    • 21. Extroversion Sociable, gregarious, and assertive Agreeableness Good-natured, cooperative, and trusting. Conscientiousness Responsible, dependable, persistent, and organized. Openness to Experience Imaginativeness, artistic, sensitivity, and intellectualism. Emotional Stability Calm, self-confident, secure (positive) versus nervous, depressed, and insecure (negative). The Big Five Personality Traits
    • 22. The Big Five Personality Traits, Cont’d
      • Openness to experience - curious, imaginative, creative, complex, refined, and sophisticated.
        • Also called “Inquisitiveness” or “Intellectualness” or even “Culture.”
        • Openness to experience is also more likely to be valuable in jobs that require high levels of creativity , defined as the capacity to generate novel and useful ideas and solutions.
        • Highly open individuals are more likely to migrate into artistic and scientific fields.
    • 23. The Big Five Personality Traits, Cont’d
      • Conscientiousness - dependable, organized, reliable, ambitious, hardworking, and persevering.
        • Conscientiousness has the biggest influence on job performance.
        • Conscientious employees prioritize accomplishment striving , which reflects a strong desire to accomplish task-related goals as a means of expressing personality.
    • 24. The Big Five Personality Traits, Cont’d
      • Extraversion - talkative, sociable, passionate, assertive, bold, and dominant.
        • Easiest to judge in zero acquaintance situations — situations in which two people have only just met.
        • Prioritize status striving , which reflects a strong desire to obtain power and influence within a social structure as a means of expressing personality.
        • Tend to be high in what’s called positive affectivity — a dispositional tendency to experience pleasant, engaging moods such as enthusiasm, excitement, and elation.
    • 25. The Big Five Personality Traits, Cont’d
      • Agreeableness - warm, kind, cooperative, sympathetic, helpful, and courteous.
        • Prioritize communion striving , which reflects a strong desire to obtain acceptance in personal relationships as a means of expressing personality.
          • Beneficial in some positions but detrimental in others.
        • Agreeable people focus on “getting along,” not necessarily “getting ahead.”
    • 26. The Big Five Personality Traits, Cont’d
      • Neuroticism - nervous, moody, emotional, insecure, and jealous.
        • Synonymous with negative affectivity —a dispositional tendency to experience unpleasant moods such as hostility, nervousness, and annoyance.
        • Associated with a differential exposure to stressors, meaning that neurotic people are more likely to appraise day-to-day situations as stressful.
        • Associated with a differential reactivity to stressors, meaning that neurotic people are less likely to believe they can cope with the stressors that they experience
    • 27. Trait Adjectives Associated with the Big Five
    • 28. Major Personality Attributes Influencing OB
      • Locus of control
      • Machiavellianism
      • Self-esteem
      • Self-monitoring
      • Propensity for risk taking
      • Type A personality
    • 29. Locus of Control
    • 30. Machiavellianism
      • Conditions Favoring High Machs
      • Direct interaction
      • Minimal rules and regulations
      • Distracting emotions
    • 31. Self-Esteem and Self-Monitoring
    • 32. Risk-Taking
      • High Risk-taking Managers
        • Make quicker decisions.
        • Use less information to make decisions.
        • Operate in smaller and more entrepreneurial organizations.
      • Low Risk-taking Managers
        • Are slower to make decisions.
        • Require more information before making decisions.
        • Exist in larger organizations with stable environments.
      • Risk Propensity
        • Aligning managers’ risk-taking propensity to job requirements should be beneficial to organizations.
    • 33. Personality Types
    • 34. Personality Types
      • Personality Types
      • Realistic
      • Investigative
      • Social
      • Conventional
      • Enterprising
      • Artistic
    • 35. Personality Types
    • 36. The End

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