AP Stats Survey Project Kimberly Loya - Frank Quiroz - Giovanni Hernandez Period. 04 Mr. Eastvedt
Our non-demographic Survey Questions <ul><li>Q1:Did you ever like Pokémon? </li></ul><ul><li>Q2:Do you watch TV? </li></ul...
Confidence Intervals for means (numerical questions) <ul><li>Equation:  </li></ul><ul><li>Q6: (2.338, 2.95) </li></ul><ul>...
Confidence intervals for proportions (opinion questions) <ul><li>Equation: </li></ul><ul><li>Q1: (.651, .808) </li></ul><u...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q2: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q3: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q4: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q5: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q8: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Hypotheses tests:  Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q9: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><...
Links to larger studies <ul><li>Q2:  http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-07-04-too-much-tv_x.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q3...
Hypothesis test: comparing the means of affirmative responses for males vs. females <ul><li>total means of survey- males v...
Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q1:  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Liking Pokemon is ind...
Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q2: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Watching TV is indepen...
Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q3: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a laptop is ind...
Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q4: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Thinking that teachers...
Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q5: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a smartphone is...
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  1. 1. AP Stats Survey Project Kimberly Loya - Frank Quiroz - Giovanni Hernandez Period. 04 Mr. Eastvedt
  2. 2. Our non-demographic Survey Questions <ul><li>Q1:Did you ever like Pokémon? </li></ul><ul><li>Q2:Do you watch TV? </li></ul><ul><li>Q3:Do you own a laptop? </li></ul><ul><li>Q4:Do you think teachers should assign homework? </li></ul><ul><li>Q5:Do you own a smartphone? </li></ul><ul><li>Q6: How many A’s did you have on your report card last semester? </li></ul><ul><li>Q7:How many times have you had your hair cut in the past year? </li></ul><ul><li>Q8:How many video games do you own? </li></ul><ul><li>Q9:How many hours of sleep do you usually get? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Confidence Intervals for means (numerical questions) <ul><li>Equation: </li></ul><ul><li>Q6: (2.338, 2.95) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of A’s on a students report card lies in the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q7: (3.48, 5.45) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of times a student cut their hair in the past year lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q8: (7.738, 13.142) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of video games a student owns lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q9: (6.853, 7.447) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of hours a student sleeps lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Confidence intervals for proportions (opinion questions) <ul><li>Equation: </li></ul><ul><li>Q1: (.651, .808) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of agreement to ever liking Pokémon is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q2: (.901, .984) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of responses agreeing to ever watching TV is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q3: (.478, .654) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students owning a laptop is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q4: (.461, .637) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who think teachers should assign homework is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q5: (.606, .771) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students owning a smartphone lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q2: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= television has an impact on children’s successes </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ = does not have an impact on a child’s success </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all students who watch TV </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.943 (yes) x=115 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>p=.507 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not enough evidence to suggest that a television in a child’s room impacts their success. We fail to reject the null hypothesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q3: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= teen girls are more likely to own a laptop than boys of the same age group </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ1≠µ2 </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>-10%: we have less than 10% of all students who own laptops </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.566 (yes) x=69 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=-.0094 p=.496 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not evidence to suggest that teen girls are more likely to own a laptop than boys in the same age group. We fail to reject the null hypothesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q4: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= homework in some subjects have little to no effect </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ homework in all subjects does have an effect </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all students who believe teachers should not give homework </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.549 (no) x=55 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=-2.179 p=.0147 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a low p-value there is evidence to suggest that homework in some subjects does have little to no impact on the student. We reject the null hypothesis with 95% confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Disagreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q5: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= the purchase of smart phones is increasing </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤the purchase is stagnate and they’re being overestimated </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all people who own smart phones </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.689 (no) x=38 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=.0419 p=.311 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not enough evidence to suggest that the purchase of smart phones is increasing. We fail to reject the null hypothesis with 95% confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q8: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= video games have an effect on a child’s control over impulse and prevent the brain from developing correctly </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ videos games do not have an effect on a child’s development </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all videogames owned </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>x=10.44 Sx=15.23 n=122 CI=95% </li></ul><ul><li>P( t ≤ X- µ/(s/ √n) </li></ul><ul><li>(7.7102, 13.017) </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean on whether video games have an affect on a child’s development lies in the interval of (7.7102, 13.017) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q9: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= the average amount of time people sleep is 8 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≥ the average amount of time people sleep is less than 8 hours </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all time spent asleep </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>x=7.15 Sx=1.674 n=122 CI=95% </li></ul><ul><li> P( t ≤ X- µ/(s/ √n) (6.85, 7.45) </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean on whether the average amount of time people spend asleep is 8 hours lies in the interval (6.48, 7.45). </li></ul>
  11. 11. Links to larger studies <ul><li>Q2: http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-07-04-too-much-tv_x.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q3: http://www.infoplease.com/science/computers/teen-technology-ownership.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q4: http://www.teachersatrisk.com/2011/05/28/homework-in-some-subjects-does-little-to--no-impact/ </li></ul><ul><li>Q5: http://www.email-marketing-reports.com/wireless-mobile/smartphone-statistics.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q8: http://www.diyfather.com/content/Interesting_Statistics_About_Video_Games </li></ul><ul><li>Q9: http://www.bls.gov/tus/charts/chart16.pdf </li></ul>
  12. 12. Hypothesis test: comparing the means of affirmative responses for males vs. females <ul><li>total means of survey- males vs. females: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: males answered “yes” to the questions more than females did </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: males did not answer “yes” to the questions more than females did </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted (out of a hat) </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: less than 10 % of students at Baldwin Park High school were surveyed </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 2 sample T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.943 (yes) x=115 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>t= X1-X2/ ( √(S1^2/N1 + S2^2/N2) </li></ul><ul><li>t= 3.015-3.086/ ( √(3.944/65 + 3.763/58) </li></ul><ul><li>t= -.10211 p=.459 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Such a high p-value suggests that we do not reject the null hypothesis that males answered yes to more survey questions than females. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q1: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Liking Pokemon is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Liking Pokemon is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 3.638 P= .3033 Because our p-value is so high, we do not reject the null hypothesis that liking Pokemon is independent of grade level. 8 18 13 50 5 6 7 15 7.033 18.967 17.041 45.959 2.98 8.025 5.95 16.049
  14. 14. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q2: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Watching TV is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Watching TV is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 2.303 P= .5119 Because our p-value is so high, we do not reject the null hypothesis and conclude that watching TV is independent of grade level. 1 25 5 58 1 10 0 22 1.492 24.508 3.615 59.385 .631 10.369 0 20.738
  15. 15. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q3: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a laptop is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Owning a laptop is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²=.652 P= .88451 Because we have such a high p-value, we do not reject the null hypothesis and conclude that owning a laptop is independent of grade level. 13 13 26 37 5 6 9 13 11.295 14.705 27.369 35.631 4.779 6.221 9.557 12.443
  16. 16. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q4: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Thinking that teachers should assign homework is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Thinking teachers should assign homework is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 6.224 P= .101 Because of our high p-value, we do not reject that the thought that teachers should assign homework is independent of grade level. 16 10 28 35 8 3 15 7 14.279 11.721 34.598 28.402 6.041 4.959 12.082 9.918
  17. 17. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q5: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a smartphone is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Owning a smartphone is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= .3731 P= .946 Because of the high p-value, we do not reject the null hypothesis that owning a smartphone is independent of grade level. All grade levels DO have different opinions. 18 8 42 21 8 3 16 6 17.902 8.098 43.377 19.623 7.574 3.426 15.148 6.852

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