Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Ap stats survey project
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ap stats survey project

4,887

Published on

AP Statistics project.

AP Statistics project.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,887
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. AP Stats Survey Project Kimberly Loya - Frank Quiroz - Giovanni Hernandez Period. 04 Mr. Eastvedt
  • 2. Our non-demographic Survey Questions <ul><li>Q1:Did you ever like Pokémon? </li></ul><ul><li>Q2:Do you watch TV? </li></ul><ul><li>Q3:Do you own a laptop? </li></ul><ul><li>Q4:Do you think teachers should assign homework? </li></ul><ul><li>Q5:Do you own a smartphone? </li></ul><ul><li>Q6: How many A’s did you have on your report card last semester? </li></ul><ul><li>Q7:How many times have you had your hair cut in the past year? </li></ul><ul><li>Q8:How many video games do you own? </li></ul><ul><li>Q9:How many hours of sleep do you usually get? </li></ul>
  • 3. Confidence Intervals for means (numerical questions) <ul><li>Equation: </li></ul><ul><li>Q6: (2.338, 2.95) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of A’s on a students report card lies in the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q7: (3.48, 5.45) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of times a student cut their hair in the past year lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q8: (7.738, 13.142) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of video games a student owns lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q9: (6.853, 7.447) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean of hours a student sleeps lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. Confidence intervals for proportions (opinion questions) <ul><li>Equation: </li></ul><ul><li>Q1: (.651, .808) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of agreement to ever liking Pokémon is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q2: (.901, .984) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of responses agreeing to ever watching TV is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q3: (.478, .654) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students owning a laptop is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q4: (.461, .637) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students who think teachers should assign homework is between the above interval. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Q5: (.606, .771) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true proportion of students owning a smartphone lies between the above interval. </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q2: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= television has an impact on children’s successes </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ = does not have an impact on a child’s success </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all students who watch TV </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.943 (yes) x=115 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>p=.507 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not enough evidence to suggest that a television in a child’s room impacts their success. We fail to reject the null hypothesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  • 6. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q3: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= teen girls are more likely to own a laptop than boys of the same age group </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ1≠µ2 </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>-10%: we have less than 10% of all students who own laptops </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.566 (yes) x=69 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=-.0094 p=.496 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not evidence to suggest that teen girls are more likely to own a laptop than boys in the same age group. We fail to reject the null hypothesis. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  • 7. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q4: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= homework in some subjects have little to no effect </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ homework in all subjects does have an effect </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all students who believe teachers should not give homework </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.549 (no) x=55 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=-2.179 p=.0147 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a low p-value there is evidence to suggest that homework in some subjects does have little to no impact on the student. We reject the null hypothesis with 95% confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Disagreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  • 8. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q5: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= the purchase of smart phones is increasing </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤the purchase is stagnate and they’re being overestimated </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all people who own smart phones </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 1 Prop Z-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.689 (no) x=38 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>z= p hat – p/ √(p(1-p)/n) </li></ul><ul><li>z=.0419 p=.311 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>With such a high p-value there is not enough evidence to suggest that the purchase of smart phones is increasing. We fail to reject the null hypothesis with 95% confidence. </li></ul><ul><li>Agreed with larger study. </li></ul>
  • 9. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q8: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= video games have an effect on a child’s control over impulse and prevent the brain from developing correctly </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≤ videos games do not have an effect on a child’s development </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all videogames owned </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>x=10.44 Sx=15.23 n=122 CI=95% </li></ul><ul><li>P( t ≤ X- µ/(s/ √n) </li></ul><ul><li>(7.7102, 13.017) </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean on whether video games have an affect on a child’s development lies in the interval of (7.7102, 13.017) </li></ul>
  • 10. Hypotheses tests: Our results VS. Larger study <ul><li>Q9: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: µ= the average amount of time people sleep is 8 hours </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: µ≥ the average amount of time people sleep is less than 8 hours </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: we have less than 10% of all time spent asleep </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>x=7.15 Sx=1.674 n=122 CI=95% </li></ul><ul><li> P( t ≤ X- µ/(s/ √n) (6.85, 7.45) </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>We are 95% confident that the true mean on whether the average amount of time people spend asleep is 8 hours lies in the interval (6.48, 7.45). </li></ul>
  • 11. Links to larger studies <ul><li>Q2: http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-07-04-too-much-tv_x.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q3: http://www.infoplease.com/science/computers/teen-technology-ownership.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q4: http://www.teachersatrisk.com/2011/05/28/homework-in-some-subjects-does-little-to--no-impact/ </li></ul><ul><li>Q5: http://www.email-marketing-reports.com/wireless-mobile/smartphone-statistics.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Q8: http://www.diyfather.com/content/Interesting_Statistics_About_Video_Games </li></ul><ul><li>Q9: http://www.bls.gov/tus/charts/chart16.pdf </li></ul>
  • 12. Hypothesis test: comparing the means of affirmative responses for males vs. females <ul><li>total means of survey- males vs. females: </li></ul><ul><li>1) Null/Alternate Hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Ho: males answered “yes” to the questions more than females did </li></ul><ul><li>Ha: males did not answer “yes” to the questions more than females did </li></ul><ul><li>2) Conditions/Assumptions </li></ul><ul><li>-Randomness: data was randomly selected and assorted (out of a hat) </li></ul><ul><li>- !0%: less than 10 % of students at Baldwin Park High school were surveyed </li></ul><ul><li>-Nearly Normal: we can assume the distribution is evenly distributed. </li></ul><ul><li>3) Name the Test: 2 sample T-Test </li></ul><ul><li>4) Do the Math </li></ul><ul><li>p=.943 (yes) x=115 n=122 </li></ul><ul><li>t= X1-X2/ ( √(S1^2/N1 + S2^2/N2) </li></ul><ul><li>t= 3.015-3.086/ ( √(3.944/65 + 3.763/58) </li></ul><ul><li>t= -.10211 p=.459 </li></ul><ul><li>5) Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Such a high p-value suggests that we do not reject the null hypothesis that males answered yes to more survey questions than females. </li></ul>
  • 13. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q1: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Liking Pokemon is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Liking Pokemon is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 3.638 P= .3033 Because our p-value is so high, we do not reject the null hypothesis that liking Pokemon is independent of grade level. 8 18 13 50 5 6 7 15 7.033 18.967 17.041 45.959 2.98 8.025 5.95 16.049
  • 14. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q2: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Watching TV is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Watching TV is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 2.303 P= .5119 Because our p-value is so high, we do not reject the null hypothesis and conclude that watching TV is independent of grade level. 1 25 5 58 1 10 0 22 1.492 24.508 3.615 59.385 .631 10.369 0 20.738
  • 15. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q3: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a laptop is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Owning a laptop is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²=.652 P= .88451 Because we have such a high p-value, we do not reject the null hypothesis and conclude that owning a laptop is independent of grade level. 13 13 26 37 5 6 9 13 11.295 14.705 27.369 35.631 4.779 6.221 9.557 12.443
  • 16. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q4: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Thinking that teachers should assign homework is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Thinking teachers should assign homework is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= 6.224 P= .101 Because of our high p-value, we do not reject that the thought that teachers should assign homework is independent of grade level. 16 10 28 35 8 3 15 7 14.279 11.721 34.598 28.402 6.041 4.959 12.082 9.918
  • 17. Chi^2 test: Do grade levels have different opinions? <ul><ul><li>Q5: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ho: Owning a smartphone is independent of grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ha: Owning a smartphone is dependent on grade level. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observed: Expected: </li></ul></ul>Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Freshman Sophomores Juniors Seniors Yes No Yes No Chi ²= .3731 P= .946 Because of the high p-value, we do not reject the null hypothesis that owning a smartphone is independent of grade level. All grade levels DO have different opinions. 18 8 42 21 8 3 16 6 17.902 8.098 43.377 19.623 7.574 3.426 15.148 6.852

×