Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Connectivity week consumer value prop 5 23_11_con week template

409

Published on

Presentation on need to build trust in smart grid markets, home energy management systems. Presented at ConnectivityWeek, May 25, 2011 by Kimberly Kupiecki, senior vice president, Edelman

Presentation on need to build trust in smart grid markets, home energy management systems. Presented at ConnectivityWeek, May 25, 2011 by Kimberly Kupiecki, senior vice president, Edelman

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
409
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • There are five distinct categories that occur in the emergence of any new technology: Technology trigger. A breakthrough, public demonstration, product launch or other event that generates significant press and industry interest. Peak of inflated expectations. a phase of overenthusiasm and unrealistic projections during which a flurry of publicized activity by technology leaders results in some successes but more failures as the technology is pushed to its limits. The only enterprises making money at this stage are conference organizers and magazine publishers. Trough of disillusionment. The point at which the technology becomes unfashionable and the press abandons the topic, because the technology did not live up to its overinflated expectations. Slope of enlightenment. Focused experimentation and solid hard work by an increasingly diverse range of organizations lead to a true understanding of the technology's applicability, risks and benefits. Commercial off-the-shelf methodologies and tools become available to ease the development process. Plateau of productivity. The real-world benefits of the technology are demonstrated and accepted. Tools and methodologies are increasingly stable as they enter their second and third generation. The final height of the plateau varies according to whether the technology is broadly applicable or only benefits a niche market.
  • Nothing works in isolation anymore. A new reality has emerged.   The sum of these changes is best represented by the move from a shareholder to a stakeholder society.  We also see this as a shift from free market to shared market; from passive to active; and from consumer to citizen.  That is why PR has to adapt and evolve to Public Engagement.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Building Trust and Communicating the Value Proposition for HEMSKimberly Kupiecki, EdelmanMay 24, 2011
    • 2. 2
      HEMS: an emerging, crowded market
      From the Cleantech group report: Home Energy Management Seeking Clarity Amidst the Hype - Jan 2011
    • 3. Is the HEMS market “awash with hype?”
      3
      smart grid
    • 4. Consumer Disposition on HEMS
      HEMS challenged by distrust of smart meters
      Perception of increased rates, big brother and lack of privacy controls
      Accenture survey shows most customers are “set and forget” variety
      Number of consumers using these tools is still very small in relation to investment
      Cost will be a factor in determining level of adoption
      Little agreement as to who should pay for the costs of the devices
      4
    • 5. How do we build trust?
      5
    • 6. 6
      Informed publics need info from multiple sources, voices at least 3-5 times to believe
      U.S.
      3-5 times
      62%
      H137. Think about everything you see or hear every day about companies, whether it is positive or negative. How many times in general do you need to be exposed to something about a specific company to believe that the information is likely to be true? Please give me a number. Informed publics ages 25-64 in the U.S.
    • 7. 7
      Technology firmly on top as most trusted industry globally and in U.S.;
      Trust in Industries
      Significant at 95% confidence level compared to global
      A30-45. [TRACKING] Now I would like to focus on your trust in different industry sectors. Please tell me how much you TRUST businesses in each of the following industries to do what is right. Again, please use a nine-point scale where one means that you “DO NOT TRUST THEM AT ALL” and nine means that you “TRUST THEM A GREAT DEAL.” (Top 4 Box) Informed publics ages 25-64 in 23 countries and the U.S.
    • 8. 8
      “Experts” top the list of credible people for information about a company
      Credible Spokespeople – U.S.
      2009
      2011
      D104-111. [TRACKING] Now I’m going to read you a list of people. In general, when forming an opinion of a company, if you heard information about a company from that person, how credible would the information be—extremely credible, very credible, somewhat credible, or not credible at all? (Top 2 Box, Credible: Very + Extremely Credible) Informed Publics ages 25-64 in the U.S.
    • 9. Trust protects reputation
      U.S.
      When a company is distrusted
      When a company is trusted
      59%
      will believe
      negative information
      after hearing it 1-2 times
      52%
      will believe positive information after hearing it 1-2 times
      will believe positive information after hearing it 1-2 times
      14%
      9%
      will believe negative information after hearing it 1-2 times
      Think about a company that you do not trust. How many times would you need to be exposed to (C83. positive information; C84. negative information) about that company to believe the information is likely to be true? Please give me a number. Informed publics ages 25-64 in the U.S.
      Think about a company that you trust. How many times would you need to be exposed to (C85. negative information; C86. positive information) about that company to believe the information is likely to be true? Please give me a number. Informed publics ages 25-64 in the U.S.
      9
    • 10. Quick recap
      HEMS is an emerging market
      Crowded
      Entry from many directions
      Customer base is currently small, early adopter
      Breach of trust with smart meters
      Know that people need to hear a message many times through many channels – surround sound
      Technology is most trusted and “expert” is the most trusted spokesperson
      10
    • 11. Engagement is critical: Why?
      Nothing works in isolation anymore – a new reality has emerged
      11
      Changing contexts & hierarchies
      Authority has been dispersed
      A media landscape in constant flux
      Societal and attitudinal shifts
      Social media is mainstream media
      Convos start anywhere involve all
      • The sum of these changes is the move from a shareholder to a stakeholder society...
      • 12. ...a shift from free market to shared market; from passive to active; from consumer to citizen
    • Conclusion
      Leverage early adopters to be champions for “fast followers”
      Use many channels, traditional, social, new, created media to engage with stakeholders
      Transparency and engagement lead to greater trust, which affects the bottom line
      12

    ×