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Authentic assessment workshop presentation
 

Authentic assessment workshop presentation

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  • 4 minutesWelcome participants. Distribute Participant’s Guide.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:The option was to write a song about the structures and functions of the brain.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:This option was to create a video about the structures and functions of the brain.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:This option was to post digital photos of the sheep brain dissection to a blog. The students received a lab guide with specific instructions and a rubric before completing the activity.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:SafeAssign has plagiarism detection built in.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Research papers were submitted with SafeAssign so that the paper is checked for plagiarism against a global database and a database of the instructor’s other students’ papers. Instructors see if students have copied from the web. If an instructor suspects a regular assignment of plagiarism, the instructor can use the direct submit tool in SafeAssign.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:Instructors can create two types of blogs: a course blog or an individual blog for each student. Students create entries and peers read the entries and comment on them. In the course blog, each member can create entries within one blog. Each member can comment as well. But students cannot edit other students’ entries or comments.
  • 2 minutesTell the participants:As students contribute to the wikis, blogs, journals and discussions, their responses feed into a stream so you see conversations as they happen. Using the blog feature instead of the assignment feature allows the students to see each others’ contributions. If it is going to be on display the students will generally put more effort into it. Seeing the other students’ contributions makes the course more interesting. The instructor is still able to measure whether the student understands the concept and the student can apply it to real life. This shows an example of a blog assignment where students had to break a social norm. For example, a male student went for a run on a jogging trail wearing a full dress suit, dress shoes and tie. People stared and asked what he was doing. He replied “Going for a run.” In another example, a girl filled her lunch tray like a boy would. She had a couple sandwiches, fries, and nachos. The other girls at the table asked her what she was doing. She replied, “Just eating my lunch.” The assignment was graded with a rubric, which required students to identify a social norm, share what they did in the blog and describe how they felt about the experience.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:This assignment is called “Developmental Psychology Show & Tell.” The students were required to bring in something from their life that represented some concept that was studied in a particular unit.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:In the wiki, different concepts were listed. Students chose a concept and posted a video or a photo of an artifact from their life that represented the concept. The students compiled multiple examples of each concept in the wiki. In a wiki, every member can edit a page and make comments. Wikis are built collaboratively.  Another useful method to use with a wiki is the jigsaw method. The instructor divides the student into groups and assigns each group a topic that the class has to learn. Each group has to become an expert on the topic and teach the rest of the class. Each group could be responsible for a page of the wiki. Students can build the content on the page collaboratively and they can see all the pages.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Another good example is an ongoing wiki that students contributed to over the course of the semester. Everyone can add, edit and comment on pages. The wiki becomes the study guide for the final exam.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:This is an example of how students can link pages within the wiki.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:When you click on the Participation and Grading button in a wiki, you find data that can be used for assessment. Instructors can see the frequency of student contributions students have made in the wiki.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:When instructors click on individual student names, they can see more specific details. For example, if you look at Franklin Pierce you see he has contributed 1611 words. Instructors can click on each student’s name to get more information. As you see here, he spent about five minutes in a single day so he probably copied and pasted quite a bit. If this was a semester long project, you can see he only spent one day on it.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Instructors can go to any page, look at the legend and see what’s been added, removed and changed.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:This is the Video Everywhere feature. It can be used to create content, create questions and give feedback while grading assignments. Students can also use it to create assignments.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:To start the recording, you simply click on the “Record from webcam button.” Instructors can review it, upload it to YouTube or start over. The videos are saved in a library and can be reused.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Click “Insert” to place the previously recorded video in the content editor. No need to embed code. These are private videos that don’t have to be searchable on YouTube.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:The next step is to save the feedback and then save it to the gradebook.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Students can use their global navigation to view the grades from all the courses. Part of effective assessment as a natural part of the teaching and learning process is prompt and accurate feedback for students.  This shows an example of how students see their grades. The student can click on the individual assignments on the left and see detailed feedback on the right.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:This is an example of the rubric used to grade the sheep dissection blog assignment. The student can also view the standards that were addressed in this assignment.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:The Retention Center notifies the educator when a student’s grades are dropping, a student falls behind on deadlines, and if a student hasn’t logged into the course in a certain amount of time. The Retention Center has a set of default rules. It is very visual; when an instructor logs in, right away he or she sees warnings (the exclamation point).
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Here’s an example of what an instructor might do if he or she wanted to find out why a class or student performed poorly on an assignment. First the instructor would generate a Course Performance Report. This report would show if the whole class performed poorly. If so, the instructor might need to rethink how the concept was taught. Perhaps the students have a common misconception.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Here the instructor can specify a target performance level, such as 70% against the standards.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Here is the Course Performance Report. The instructor gets a visualization of how the class as a whole is performing against different types of assessments.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:This is a breakdown of students. Instructors can see students who are above the bar of 70% and students who are below it.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:The Detail by Goal section of the course report shows how students have performed against each individual standard. So for example, for the standard “Describe how a social group can influence the behavior of an individual or another group” the class is at 100% so the lesson was very effective.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:However, for the standard “Identify the role of the corpus callosum” the class is failing; the class average is below 70%. The instructor may choose to look for alternative content such as a video or interactive activity to correct the misconception.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:Here is an example of how an instructor might go about looking at an individual student’s grade. The first chart demonstrates his strengths and weaknesses ofdifferent types of assessments.The detail by goal section gives a breakdown of the student’s performance for each standard. The instructor could print this PDF and share it with the student and/or parents.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:Another useful report is the Course Activity Report. The instructor can narrow the course activity based on a time frame. For example, if the instructor wanted to see what resources the student was using and practicing with two weeks before the test, the report might show that the student performed poorly because the student never entered the lesson, he only practiced for 5 seconds or he practiced the wrong unit.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:The Student Course Activity Report shows the number of times a student logs in, the content items that the student interacted with, how many times the student accessed the activities and how much time was spent on each activity.
  • Less than 1 minute Tell the participants:Here the instructor sees that Lucy is 25% below the class average. Instructors can choose to monitor students. These students show up on the right hand side.
  • Less than 1 minuteTell the participants:Instructors can click on individual student names and see detailed information. Here the instructor can send a message to the student and/or the parents.

Authentic assessment workshop presentation Authentic assessment workshop presentation Presentation Transcript

  • AuthenticAssessment withBlackboard Learn
  • 22Workshop ObjectiveBy the end of the workshop,participants will be able to:Identify many options for authenticassessment, both formative andsummative, in Blackboard Learn.
  • 33
  • 44
  • 55
  • 66How do I know when to usetraditional assessments and whento use authentic assessments?
  • 771. Assessment options2. Evaluation and feedback and feedbackRoadmap
  • 8We not only want students to acquireknowledge and skills but also to use theacquired knowledge and skills in the realworld.Source: Mueller, J. (2005). The authentic assessment toolbox: Enhancing student learning through online facultydevelopment. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 1(1), 1-7.
  • 99Source: Knowing What Students Know.Assessment #1Question: What was the date of the battle of theSpanish Armada?Answer: 1588 [correct].Question: What can you tell me about what thismeant?Answer: Not much. It was one of the dates Imemorized for the exam. Want to hear the others?Purpose of AssessmentSource: Pellegrino, J. W., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (Eds.). (2001). Knowing what students know: The science and designof educational assessment. National Academies Press.Image Source: Spanish Armada. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved May 23, 2013, fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_Armada
  • 1010Source: Knowing What Students Know.Assessment #2Question: What was the date of the battle of theSpanish Armada?Answer: It must have been around 1590.Question: Why do you say that?Answer: I know the English began to settle inVirginia just after 1600, not sure of the exact date.They wouldn’t have dared start overseasexplorations if Spain still had control of the seas. Itwould take a little while to get expeditions organized,so England must have gained naval supremacysomewhere in the late 1500s.Purpose of AssessmentSource: Pellegrino, J. W., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (Eds.). (2001). Knowing what students know: The science and designof educational assessment. National Academies Press.Image Source: Spanish Armada. (n.d.). In Wikipedia. Retrieved May 23, 2013, fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_Armada
  • 1111Purpose of AssessmentTests all by themselves, are neitherformative or summative. It’s howyou use the results.Source: Popham, W. J., & Popham, J. W. (2005). Classroom assessment: What teachers need to know.Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.
  • 1212SummativeAssessmentEvaluationFormativeAssessmentEvaluate quality andeffectiveness ofeducational programsand institutionsIndividual achievementPurpose of AssessmentAssist learningSource: Pellegrino, J. W., Chudowsky, N., & Glaser, R. (Eds.). (2001). Knowing what students know: Thescience and design of educational assessment. National Academies Press.
  • 13131. Assessment Options
  • 1414Options
  • 1515More Options
  • 1616Question Types
  • 1717Portfolio
  • 1818Web Conferencing
  • 1919Voice Authoring
  • 2020Psychology Course
  • 2121Hot Spot Question
  • 2222Formative Assessment
  • 2323Formative Assessment
  • 2424Summative Assessment
  • 2525Summative Assessment
  • 2626Learning Styles
  • 27Auditory Learners
  • 28Visual Learners
  • 29Kinesthetic Learners
  • 30Safe Assignment
  • 31Safe Assignment
  • 32Blog
  • 33Posts
  • 34Wiki
  • 35Wiki
  • 36Wiki
  • 37Wiki
  • 38Wiki
  • 39Wiki
  • 40Wiki
  • 41412. Evaluation and Feedback
  • 42Video Everywhere
  • 43Video Everywhere
  • 44Video Everywhere
  • 45Video Everywhere
  • 46Student Grades
  • 47Student Grades
  • 48Retention Center
  • 49Course Performance
  • 50Course Performance
  • 51Course Performance
  • 52Course Performance
  • 53Course Performance
  • 54Course Performance
  • 55Learner Performance
  • 56Course Activity Overview
  • 57Student Activity Overview
  • 58Students at Risk
  • 59Students at Risk
  • 6060Roadmap1. Assessment options2. Evaluation and feedback and feedback
  • 6161How do I know when to usetraditional assessments and whento use authentic assessments?
  • 6262Questions?ThankYou!