Youth Justice Reinvestment
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Youth Justice Reinvestment

on

  • 311 views

For decades, California and the nation have responded to nearly every problem in our classrooms and communities with police and prisons. These efforts have pushed millions of students out of school, ...

For decades, California and the nation have responded to nearly every problem in our classrooms and communities with police and prisons. These efforts have pushed millions of students out of school, and led to the mass incarceration of youth and our families. Public policies have also disproportionately targeted Black and Brown youth, contributing to severe racial injustice in our educational and court systems. A growing movement led by youth and families is demanding a new investment in public safety - one that prioritizes COLLEGE PREP NOT PRISON PREP!

Statistics

Views

Total Views
311
Views on SlideShare
311
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • There are now 0 youth prisoners in other countries .

Youth Justice Reinvestment Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The YOUTH JUSTICE COALITION/FREE L.A.!is working to build a youth andcommunity-led movement - mobilizing youth in lock-ups and on the street,their families and formerly incarcerated people - to challenge race, genderand class inequality in Los Angeles County’s, California’s and the nation’sjuvenile injustice system. The YJC’s goal is to dismantle policies andinstitutions that have ensured the massive arrest, detention, incarcerationand deportation of people of color, widespread police violence andcorruption, consistent violation of youth and communities Constitutionaland human rights, the creation of a school-to-jail track, and the build-up ofthe worlds largest network of jails and prisons. We use direct actionorganizing, advocacy, political education and activist arts to agitate, expose,and annoy the people in charge in order to upset power and bring aboutchange.
  • 2. Organizing Campaigns:1.Impact conditions of confinement at juvenilehalls, camps, county jails and prisons, includingchallenging LIFE WIHTOUT PAROLE and otherextreme sentences. (Including Senate Bills 9,260, 61 and Welcome Home L.A.)2.Challenge the County’s War on Gangsincluding ending the use of gang databasesand gang injunctions. (Including Senate Bill458.)3.Reduce L.A. County’s over-reliance onincarceration and increase community basedalternatives to arrest, court, detention andincarceration, with a goal of reducing lock-upby 75% in ten years, including closingCYA/DJJ youth prisons.4.Dollar for Dollar - Move law enforcementdollars to youth jobs, peaceworkers/intervention workers and youthcenters. (Just 1% = 100 Million.)5.End the school-to-jail track (no truancytickets/truancy sweeps, free metro passes,replace police in schools and school push-out with intervention workers andTransformative Justice.6.S.T.O.P. Police Violence.
  • 3. YOUTH SEEN ASSATAN1600s
  • 4. ORIGINAL SINThe Puritans believe that childrenare born close to the Devil, and therole of society and family is towrestle Satan from within the child.
  • 5. FIRST PUBLIC SCHOOLSMassachusetts’ Old SatanDeluder Act of 1647establishes first public schoolsystem. Since, Puritansbelieved that children wereborn with the “original sin,”they had to be raised in anatmosphere of fear, strictdiscipline, hard work, and astrong knowledge of the Bibleto delude Satan.
  • 6. YOUTH SEEN ASSAVAGES1800/1900s
  • 7. INDUSTRIALREVOLUTIONAs the Nation’s first well-known StateSecretary of Education, Horace Mannargued in 1837 that public education‟s goalsare to create an “industrious class of womenand men” who obey the law and are diligentin their work.” For factory and mining work,only basic literacy was required. By 1860,there were no more than 300 high schools inthe United States, less than 100 of them free.The public education system designed byFranklin and promoted by Mann is still thestandard public school curriculum today.
  • 8. ClassroomManagementWith strict discipline,“one who studieseducational theorycan see in themechanical routine ofthe classroom, theeducative forces thatare slowlytransforming the childfrom a little savageinto a creature fit forlaw and order, fit forthe life of civilizedsociety.”- 1907William ChandlerBagley
  • 9. YOUTH SEEN ASREBELSRADICALS &REVOLUTIONARIES1960s - EARLY 70s
  • 10. OUT OF L.A. CAME THE BUILDERS OF SCHOOL DE-FUNDING AND MASS INCARCERATION
  • 11. ’65 Watts Rebellion in response to police brutality in South L.A.FBI and police surveillance,infiltration and bombing of Panther headquarters in L.A. and Pasadena; leads to UnitedSlaves shoot out with Panthers at UCLA. (US leader Karenga goes on to found Kwanzaaand teach at Cal State Long Beach.) Geronimo Pratt (now Geronimo Ji Jaga) is framed byLAPD and FBI. Crushing of prisoners’ rights movement at Soledad; guards assassinateGeorge Jackson and his brother. (Jacksons are from Pasadena.) Angela Davis teachesand organizes at UCLA. LAPD riot on Chicano Moratorium and assassination of L.A.Times reporter Ruben Salazar. CIA floods L.A.’s neighborhoods with drugs.IN L.A. :
  • 12. U.S. POLICIES THAT COME OUT OF L.A.:Nixon‟s Law and Order backlash after60s movements leads to mass incarcerationof poor people and people of color. The prison populationincreases 300% in 20 years. Cali and L.A. lead the worldin incarceration and harsh sentencing, including creationof JLWOP, Three Strikes, Prop 21 and Prop 9 - all arewritten and financed from L.A..Reaganomics including anti-tax movement and Prop 13.,the “war on drugs” and war on welfare, and mental healthde-institutionalization without community services, alllead to massive increase in homelessness. L.A. creates“planned Skid Row” to force homeless into downtownisolation.U.S. fuels wars against rebellions in Central America. Inthe 1980s, LAPD and Sheriffs work with U.S. military toteach counter-guerilla tactics, interrogation and tortureagainst civilians. In the 90s and 00s, they return to teachgang suppression when people are deported - (thegreatest number from L.A.)Chief Parker introduces military-style policing and bringsNational Guard into Watts in „65. Gates takesmilitarization further by creating SWAT and CRASH (firstgang units).‟92 Uprising once again reflects L.A.‟s angerover entrenched police brutality. Gates also createdDARE.2007 - Jordan Downs is first community in the U.S. to getGPS surveillance system. L.A. and Riverside first to useGPS monitoring to track people with gang convictionsreturning home from prison.
  • 13. THEN CAME L.A.’S “WAR ON GANGS”
  • 14. YOUTH SEEN ASPREDATORS1980s - 1990s
  • 15. Los Angeles County built the nation’s first comprehensive gang suppression policies:[1] Gang injunctions - first in 1983,the ability to lock down aneighborhood and arrest people if they areon the street with another alleged gangmember, out past a curfew, or carrying a cell phone.[2] Gang databases in 1987 -computerized lists that labelpeople as “gang members”without their knowledge, withoutany chance to appeal, and without aclear way to get off.(3) The statewide STEP Act in 1988 that provided the nation’s first law targeting streetgangs, first gang definition, first language referring to gang members as “terrorists,”first gang enhancements in court, and took database statewide [Cal Gangs Database].[4] In 1985, L.A. established CLEAR I[Community Law Enforcement and Recovery].
  • 16. THAT WAS FOLLOWED BY THE SCHOOL-TO-JAIL TRACK
  • 17. PRESIDENT REAGAN APPOINTSWILLIAM BENNET AS U.S.SECRETARY OF EDUCATION.ZeroTolerancepolicies include requirements forsuspension, expulsion and arrests; thetakeover of school discipline by policedepartments; and relationships inschools replaced by metal detectors,locker searches, drug-sniffing dogs,and security gates.
  • 18. 1. PoliceDepartmentstake overschool security2. More ProbationOfficers thanCounselors3. Schools lookand run likeprisons; somehave the samearchitects4. Searches, metaldetectors, gangprofiling5. Leads tomassive push-out and arrest
  • 19. CALIFORNIA’SADDICTIONTO INCARCERATION
  • 20. IN 1980, CALIFORNIA ALREADY HAD 12 PRISONS.AND THEN, WITH THE MASSIVE DEMAND FORCELLS THAT CAME WITH TOUGH-ON-CRIMEPOLICIES, THE STATE STARTED TO RAPIDLYEXPAND THE BUILDING OF PRISONS AND CUT THEBUDGET TO EVERYTHING ELSE.
  • 21. DURING THAT SAME TIME,CALIFORNIA BUILT TWO CALSTATES AND ONE UNIVERSITY.
  • 22. BY 2010, CALI HAD 176 THOUSAND STATEPRISONERS. 40% FROM L.A. COUNTY.2010With realignment, 135,000 people in prison. The question remainswhether we will just shift bodies from state cages to county cages.
  • 23. California used to be #1 in school spendingand had one of the best schoolsystems in the world.Now, California is #1 in prison spending,and with this year’s budget cuts,dropped from #47 to #50in school spending!South and East L.A. lead thenation in school overcrowding,low test scores anddrop-out/push-out rateswith only 40%of students graduating.
  • 24. The YJC investigated the budgets for all 57 law enforcement departmentswithin LA County, interviewed youth on their experiences with the police, andsurveyed more than 2,000 residents on a 50 mile march across LA County.
  • 25. Job and Cost Comparisons Between Law Enforcement and Intervention
  • 26. Intervention Savings: Each Murder Costs $1 Million to Investigate andaverages $16 million more in Jail, Court and Incarceration. With drasticdecreases in homicide, should the saved money be reinvestment in ourschools and communities?
  • 27. Just1%of L.A.’s Courts,Police, Sheriffs’District Attorney’s,Probation’s and CityAttorney’s Budgetswould pay for: 500 full-time interventionworkers/peacebuilders;50 youth centers open from3pm - midnight, 365 days ayear; and 25,000 youthjobs!