Subject-Specific Literacy
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Subject-Specific Literacy

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Presented at Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic DSB

Presented at Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic DSB

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  • 9 am\n\nIntro to the day by?\n
  • 9 – 9:20\n\nFacilitate small group discussions based on participants’ choice of one of the six metaphors (Marian has signs). \nclean sweep – lost in the woods –cozy campfire– getting your feet wet – ready to take a big bite – team synergy \nLead the large group in sharing what was said at each station. \nDebrief metaphor and ‘six’ corners activity. \n
  • Any reminders that Marian needs to provide to participants.\n
  • Need to know where we are going. Learning goals help both the learner and the teacher understand direction and expectations.\n
  • Explain a bit. Segue into real world texts you see in Toronto\n
  • 9:30 \n\nIntro to me… and launch into the idea of change and gaps in literacy. . . Ask people to record what they think of when they think of literacy instruction and literacy in high school.\n\nSecondary Curriculum Co-ordinator with responsibilities for literacy and pedagogy connected to technology\nThird year participating in teacher inquiry projects connected to adolescent literacy and subject-specific literacy\nChair of regional literacy council for London Region\nOrganize and co-plan various events – part of the planning committee, along with Marian for literacy gains summer camp. One of the organizers for TEDx Ontario Ed help last spring, giving a workshop at the ECCO conference in Richmond Hill in November. Active Online life. Change for me. I wasn’t always like that. \nAnd as I started to change how I communicated, where I did my reading and writing and therefore thinking, I started to realize that there was a lot more to literacy than I was teaching in my classes. There were gaps between what was happening in my class and the real world. Now there have always been gaps between what the school calls literacy activities and what people actually do outside of school (elaborate)\n\nAlso gap in meaning of literacy versus literacies (traditional and new\n
  • Gap btwn in school and out of school literacies. Btween traditional definition of literacy as reading and writing/OSSLT and the idea that there are literacies. Gap between subject areas. Negotiate that gap today.\n\nTake stock of how comfortable they are moving forward at this point. How many of you like the idea of literacy being broader – would like a new word to describe. Hard time seeing that visual art can be considered literacy? A tech product can be considered literacy – a text message (not literacy) How many of you?\n10 mins\n
  • Who knows what this is?\n\nMessage about text? \n\nSecondary message about how some students require assistive tech in order to decode text.\n
  • Background knowledge needed to decode the text. Highly specialized. \n
  • Background knowledge and different entry points. Not easy to understand. Making connections is huge component of literacy development. Note that we all had different entry points based on when we were able to make the connection.\n
  • 9:40 (might move)\n\nSorting Activity with ministry quotations. Which one is most important in your discipline?\n\nOur two starting places are with our current, individual knowledge and understanding of literacy and with ministry documents. Teachers should be sitting in subject groupings for this.\n\nOur work should always be rooted in the curriculum and in ministry documents. \n
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  • 10:00\n\nOne way to understand the disconnect between in school and out of school literacies is to think about what is valued at home, versus what is valued at school. (explain) Students need to understand how to transition and what to do with conflicting values. Ok to have both. Good way to do this, is show them they are experts at something that has specialized vocabulary, rules and ways of being.\n\n\nIt's no wonder I don't do well in school.\nWhat goes on in this school has nothing\nin common with what I do at home. My dad\nthinks reading anything other than the \nnewspaper is a waste of time and that I should\nbe mowing the lawn or doing other chores instead\nof reading a book or using the internet.\n
  • \n
  • To be a member or the rodeo team discourse community, you need to be able to ride a horse, throw a rope, wear western clothes, use cowboy slang, drive a pickup truck with a horse trailer, saddle and bridle a horse, know and feel comfortable around cows, and be willing to spend a lot of time practicing i a hot, dusty area. In addition, a cowgirl wanna-be should wear Wrangler jeans, snap button shirts, have rough hands with short nails, and know country and western songs by heart. Cowgirls usually have long hair which they wrap in a bun or wear in a long braid down the middle of their backs. Cowgirls do not go halfway on makeup. They either wear none at all, or so much they can hardly hold their eyes open.\n
  • Reality television shows all seem to have a unique lingo that doesn’t quite fit in with...well...reality. To understand the discourse of reality t.v., you only have to spend some time on your couch with Paris Hilton, Flava Flav, or Jeff Probst. You may come to understand the magnitude of roses, immunity idols and backstage passes. And if you can keep up with the Kardashians, you could pick up some of the lingo of the Real World (New Orleans season 9, Key West season 17, or Cancun season 22 ). Spend some time on the Jersey shore, and you will be able to use the terms “smush”, “juiced”, and “grenade” in a casual conversation. Understand the acronym “G.T.L”, and you can tout yourself an expert. Spend long enough on your couch and you may realize the importance of “bringing it” in the final hour to stay on the tour bus/boardroom/island/catwalk/celebrity rehab unit. Whether you watch Date My Ex, Date My House, Dating in the Dark, Disaster Date or Fake-a-Date, learning the language of reality t.v. requires that you let go of the hard-and-fast rules of the English language. You must be able to suspend disbelief when Bret Micheal’s earnestly proclaims his date as “awesomer”, and to stifle an eye-twitch when Tyra Banks blinks wide-eyed at a fledgeling model and tells her that she just has to “smize” on her “go-sees”. If you cannot understand the specialized discourse of reality television, you may find that “you are the weakest link”, and that the “tribe has spoken”. As Donald Trump would say, with a toss of his hairpiece and a cobra-like strike of the palm, “You’re fired”.\n
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  • Illiterate in this discourse community.\n
  • \n
  • How did we do?\n
  • How did we do?\n
  • Develop a template – sentence starters needed.\n\nKeep it to 4 sentences.\n\n… ideas are at the heart of the discipline\n…habits of mind (kinds of thinking) are at the heart of the discipline.\n(subject area) uses, reads and creates these texts.\n\nShow example of history\n
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  • Close – you’ve developed these definitions. Is this the stuff in your rubrics? On you anchors? Exemplars? Feedback.\n\nIn early elementary school, we focus on general, basic literacy skills like recognizing words and their meaning, responding to punctuation when you read, stories based around a problem. As students go beyond this into upper elementary grades they are asked to read more sophisticated texts and provide more sophisticated responses that are not as widely applicable to different types of texts. They learn less common forms of punctuation, more specialized vocabulary and a larger body of vocabulary terms. In grades 7 – 12, these literacy skills aren’t enough. Literacy becomes disciplinary and a high school student who can do a reasonably good job of reading a story in an English class might not be able to make much sense of a biology or algebra book, and vice versa. Although most students master basic and intermediate literacy skills, many never gain proficiency with some of the more advanced skills that would allow them to read and communicate in science, history. Because of the specialization of literacy in higher grades, the words and uses of literacy in specialized subjects don’t usually pop up in student’s conversations. This makes them harder to learn. Something else makes these skills harder to learn. . . They are rarely taught. By the time adolescents are being challenged by disciplinary texts, the specific literacy instruction is thinning. Decline in instructional support. (make it a questions or something to consider?)\n
  • Close – you’ve developed these definitions. Is this the stuff in your rubrics? On you anchors? Exemplars? Feedback.\n\nIn early elementary school, we focus on general, basic literacy skills like recognizing words and their meaning, responding to punctuation when you read, stories based around a problem. As students go beyond this into upper elementary grades they are asked to read more sophisticated texts and provide more sophisticated responses that are not as widely applicable to different types of texts. They learn less common forms of punctuation, more specialized vocabulary and a larger body of vocabulary terms. In grades 7 – 12, these literacy skills aren’t enough. Literacy becomes disciplinary and a high school student who can do a reasonably good job of reading a story in an English class might not be able to make much sense of a biology or algebra book, and vice versa. Although most students master basic and intermediate literacy skills, many never gain proficiency with some of the more advanced skills that would allow them to read and communicate in science, history. Because of the specialization of literacy in higher grades, the words and uses of literacy in specialized subjects don’t usually pop up in student’s conversations. This makes them harder to learn. Something else makes these skills harder to learn. . . They are rarely taught. By the time adolescents are being challenged by disciplinary texts, the specific literacy instruction is thinning. Decline in instructional support. (make it a questions or something to consider?)\n
  • Close – you’ve developed these definitions. Is this the stuff in your rubrics? On you anchors? Exemplars? Feedback.\n\nIn early elementary school, we focus on general, basic literacy skills like recognizing words and their meaning, responding to punctuation when you read, stories based around a problem. As students go beyond this into upper elementary grades they are asked to read more sophisticated texts and provide more sophisticated responses that are not as widely applicable to different types of texts. They learn less common forms of punctuation, more specialized vocabulary and a larger body of vocabulary terms. In grades 7 – 12, these literacy skills aren’t enough. Literacy becomes disciplinary and a high school student who can do a reasonably good job of reading a story in an English class might not be able to make much sense of a biology or algebra book, and vice versa. Although most students master basic and intermediate literacy skills, many never gain proficiency with some of the more advanced skills that would allow them to read and communicate in science, history. Because of the specialization of literacy in higher grades, the words and uses of literacy in specialized subjects don’t usually pop up in student’s conversations. This makes them harder to learn. Something else makes these skills harder to learn. . . They are rarely taught. By the time adolescents are being challenged by disciplinary texts, the specific literacy instruction is thinning. Decline in instructional support. (make it a questions or something to consider?)\n
  • Whole Group – Thursday –10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Jenni \nDigest Keynote – extension of our thinking – assess where they are in their own learning. \nOn Monday evening, each participant identified one professional learning goal he/she wanted to achieve while at camp. Ask participants to reflect back on goal. \n Reflect on the professional learning goal that you set at the beginning of camp.\n Were you able to achieve your goal? \n What are your next steps?\nAlso, bring them back to their agenda for action. \n
  • How did we do?\n
  • How did we do?\n
  • Exit card questions could address the pyramid. Here’s what I heard from you.\n

Subject-Specific Literacy Subject-Specific Literacy Presentation Transcript

  • Adolescent Literacy
  • Which metaphor best reflects your thinking and learning about
  • Housekeeping
  • by Will Ellis
  • Learning Goals I will have a broader understanding of literacy. I will develop and share a definition of literacy for my subject. I will develop a list of real world texts used by people who work in my discipline.
  • About Me
  • by Endlisnis
  • Tweet or Text?
  • Setting the Stage
  • Break
  • Discourse Community• speak the same language• share interest and body of knowledge about topics• share a common vocabulary for discussing the topics• context of the discourse community changes the way language is used• sport, hobby, passion, family, religion, ethnicity, political affiliation,• school is a discourse community made up of smaller discourse communities for
  • Teach me about a discourse community we do not share. The discourse community can be a club,
  • Teach me about a discourse community we do not share. The discourse community can be a club,
  • To be a member of my subject’s discoursecommunity, I must know, think, do, etc.
  • Learning Goals I will have a broader understanding of literacy. I will develop and share a definition of literacy for my subject. I will develop a list of real world texts used by people who work in my discipline.
  • Success Criteria• Definition of literacy in my subject area considers more than reading and writing, but also the thinking skills developed and required by my subject.• The generated list of texts are authentic and go beyond classroom texts.• Technology used to present and share my thinking.
  • Develop a definition for literacy in your subject area.•What ideas are at the heart of thediscipline?• What ‘habits of mind’ are at the heart of the discipline?• What text does your discipline – use – read – create?
  • Define Literacy
  • Sharing
  • Develop a definition for literacy in your subject area.What are the differences? What are thesimilarities?What impact might these differences andsimilarities have on student learning?How do/can we work together to helpstudents develop the literacy skills requiredof them in high school?
  • Literacy Development
  • Literacy Development In grades 7 – 12 literacy skills become increasingly specialized, yet instructional support for literacy skills decreases.
  • Literacy Development In grades 7 – 12 literacy skills become increasingly specialized, yet instructional support for literacy skills decreases. Students read more sophisticated texts and provide more sophisticated responses.
  • Literacy Development In grades 7 – 12 literacy skills become increasingly specialized, yet instructional support for literacy skills decreases. Students read more sophisticated texts and provide more sophisticated responses. Students develop basic literacy skills like recognizing words and responding to punctuation.
  • Consolidation
  • Learning Goals I will have a broader understanding of literacy. I will develop and share a definition of literacy for my subject. I will develop a list of real world texts used by people who work in my discipline.
  • Success Criteria• Definition of literacy in my subject area considers more than reading and writing, but also the thinking skills developed and required by my subject.• The generated list of texts are authentic and go beyond classroom texts.• Technology used to present and share my thinking.
  • Exit Card• What new understandings have you acquired?• How did you acquire new understandings?• What questions do you have?• What are your next steps?