Shared Learning Made by Avon Maitland teachers and based on group readings from Educational Leadership Image by  ryancr
Professional Learning 2.0 Background by  tryingtolearn USA
 
Web 2.0 <ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies can help schools create the structures necessary for sustained, complex, and meaningf...
Strategies <ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moodle (Databases and forums) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wiki  </li></ul>...
Why Teachers Should Try Twitter
 
&quot;Twitter posts challenged my thinking and led me to great resources without having to spend hours searching.&quot; Ph...
<ul><li>&quot;We can use digital tools to differentiate learning experiences for students.&quot; </li></ul>
<ul><li>&quot;I could look into the minds of motivated peers to learn about the new projects they were undertaking, the re...
Can't Get Kids to Read? Make It Social
Dragging Back Their Brains <ul><li>- begin by recognizing today's students are driven by opportunities to interact with on...
Professional Learning 2.0 <ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies can help schools create the structures necessary for sustained, com...
Can't Get Kids to Read? Make It Social Begin by recognizing that today's students are driven by opportunities to interact ...
Effective teachers must adapt to keep their students engaged. <ul><li>* opportunities for social interaction </li></ul><ul...
Teaching Inference photo by the jbird
 
&quot;Making inferences is the foundation to many higher-level thinking processes.&quot; <ul><ul><li>Kids make inferences ...
The four questions... <ul><ul><li>What is my inference?  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What information did I use to make thi...
What is my inference? <ul><ul><li>There are two types of inferences: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>de...
What information did I use to make this inference? <ul><ul><li>The teacher needs to guide the students in considering and ...
How good was my thinking? <ul><ul><li>Examining the validity of their thinking: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul...
Do I need to change my thinking? <ul><ul><li>Ask the kids to consider possible changes in their thinking </li></ul></ul><u...
Representing Knowledge Nonlinguistically
 
  <ul><li>Creating nonlinguistic representations requires students to think about the content in new ways. </li></ul>
Five Points to Keep in Mind <ul><ul><li>  Nonlinguistic representations come in many forms.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  ...
How Flat Is Your Classroom? Image by  darklorddisco
 
Big Idea <ul><li>Flat classroom projects have the power to produce world-class students with a world view based on underst...
Teach Connect Project <ul><li>http://teachconnect.ning.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Pairs teachers who have c...
Wikis <ul><li>pbworks.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>wikispaces.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Colla...
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Shared Learning from Ed Leadership Readings

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On June 3rd, 2010, Avon Maitland teachers read articles from Educational Leadership while participating in a reciprocal teaching activity. They later shared what they had learned from the content of the articles by creating slides in google presentations. Here is the result of their work.

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  • On June 3rd, 2010, Avon Maitland teachers read articles from Educational Leadership while participating in a reciprocal teaching activity. They later shared what they had learned from the content of the articles by creating slides in google presentations. Here is the result of their work.
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Shared Learning from Ed Leadership Readings

  1. 1. Shared Learning Made by Avon Maitland teachers and based on group readings from Educational Leadership Image by ryancr
  2. 2. Professional Learning 2.0 Background by tryingtolearn USA
  3. 4. Web 2.0 <ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies can help schools create the structures necessary for sustained, complex, and meaningful professional learning. </li></ul>
  4. 5. Strategies <ul><li>Web 2.0 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Moodle (Databases and forums) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wiki </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blog </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ning (create social networks, add on to face to face discussion) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jing (Free software, adds visuals to online conversations) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RSS Feeds (Frequent updates, ex.  bus cancellations) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  5. 6. Why Teachers Should Try Twitter
  6. 8. &quot;Twitter posts challenged my thinking and led me to great resources without having to spend hours searching.&quot; Photo by Justin Fisk
  7. 9. <ul><li>&quot;We can use digital tools to differentiate learning experiences for students.&quot; </li></ul>
  8. 10. <ul><li>&quot;I could look into the minds of motivated peers to learn about the new projects they were undertaking, the research reports they were studying, and the Web sites they were exploring.”             -Wm. M Ferrier </li></ul>by paul (dex) ( contact )
  9. 11. Can't Get Kids to Read? Make It Social
  10. 12. Dragging Back Their Brains <ul><li>- begin by recognizing today's students are driven by opportunities to interact with one another </li></ul><ul><li>-understanding that participation is a priority </li></ul><ul><li>- the best teachers create social reading experiences </li></ul><ul><li>- lines between fun and work is fine </li></ul>
  11. 13. Professional Learning 2.0 <ul><li>Web 2.0 technologies can help schools create the structures necessary for sustained, complex, and meaningful professional learning.  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Online communication could be facilitated through the use of the following online tools: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>  Wiki: a website that guests can access, edit, and others can build on your input. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter: short text-based posts which keep users continuously informed and allow them to share information, texts, images, and links </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NING: online social network to connect people for a specific purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blog: a web-based journal; users can embed graphics, videos, and links </li></ul></ul>
  12. 14. Can't Get Kids to Read? Make It Social Begin by recognizing that today's students are driven by opportunities to interact with one another.
  13. 15. Effective teachers must adapt to keep their students engaged. <ul><li>* opportunities for social interaction </li></ul><ul><li>* use tools such as Diigo, Google Docs </li></ul><ul><li>* emphasize online communication and opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>* embrace technology </li></ul><ul><li>* use reciprocal teaching </li></ul><ul><li>* make reading interactive </li></ul><ul><li>(differentiate) </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Pable Viera
  14. 16. Teaching Inference photo by the jbird
  15. 18. &quot;Making inferences is the foundation to many higher-level thinking processes.&quot; <ul><ul><li>Kids make inferences all the time without realizing it </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Teachers can guide students in analyzing the effectiveness of their inferences by posing four questions </li></ul></ul>
  16. 19. The four questions... <ul><ul><li>What is my inference? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What information did I use to make this inference? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How good was my thinking? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do I need to change my thinking? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>A primary student predicts that something bad is probably going to happen in a story about two children walking alone in the forest. </li></ul><ul><li>A middle school student concludes that seasons result from the elliptical orbit of the Earth. Winter is when the Earth is farthest from the sun. </li></ul>
  17. 20. What is my inference? <ul><ul><li>There are two types of inferences: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>default inferences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>automatic assumptions based on familiarity </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>reasoned inferences </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>based on background knowledge and previous experiences, information available </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Image by paurian
  18. 21. What information did I use to make this inference? <ul><ul><li>The teacher needs to guide the students in considering and articulating the premises on which they based their inference: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>familiarity with other stories </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>generalized knowledge of temperature and proximity to heat sources </li></ul></ul></ul>Picture by Chris Campbell
  19. 22. How good was my thinking? <ul><ul><li>Examining the validity of their thinking: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Default inferences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask the students to consider other possible premises: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;Do you think there are stories about children lost in the woods where something bad does not happen?&quot; </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;What are some other things that might happen?&quot;  </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasoned inferences   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Examine both the truth of the premise and the validity of the thinking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask the student to explain his/her thinking </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Point out misconceptions and missing elements in the explanation </li></ul></ul></ul>Picture by AJC1
  20. 23. Do I need to change my thinking? <ul><ul><li>Ask the kids to consider possible changes in their thinking </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps to develop the habit of continually updating their thinking as they gather new information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Default inference   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Be alert for different patterns in the story plots in the future  </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reasoned inference   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The science student might become more aware of the need to consider additional facts before coming to a conclusion about physical phenomena   </li></ul></ul></ul>
  21. 24. Representing Knowledge Nonlinguistically
  22. 26.   <ul><li>Creating nonlinguistic representations requires students to think about the content in new ways. </li></ul>
  23. 27. Five Points to Keep in Mind <ul><ul><li>  Nonlinguistic representations come in many forms. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  Nonlinguistic representations must identify crucial information. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students should explain their nonlinguistic representations.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Representations can take a lot of time. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students should revise their representations when necessary. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Photo Courtesy of CRASH: candy </li></ul>
  24. 28. How Flat Is Your Classroom? Image by  darklorddisco
  25. 30. Big Idea <ul><li>Flat classroom projects have the power to produce world-class students with a world view based on understanding, not misinformed bias from the media. </li></ul>It is Easy Free web based tools and an internet connection is where to start.
  26. 31. Teach Connect Project <ul><li>http://teachconnect.ning.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Pairs teachers who have collaborative project ideas </li></ul>Image by David Blackwell
  27. 32. Wikis <ul><li>pbworks.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>wikispaces.com </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative online workspaces </li></ul>ePals www.epals.com   - Great for students in elementary and middle schools - safely connect with other students around the world

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