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  • 2011: Focus education outcomes more on labour market needs, including by improving access to higher education and by strengthening the effectiveness of the vocational training system. Take further measures to reduce early school-leaving by identifying, analysing and measuring its causes by 2012 and by setting up a monitoring &reporting mechanism on the success rate of the measures 2012: Take steps to reduce the high rate of ESL. Pursue policy efforts in the education system to match the skills required by the labour market. Enhance the provision and affordability of more childcare and out-of-school centres, with the aim of reducing the gender employment gap.
  • 1. Smart growth : developing an economy based on knowledge and innovation 2. Sustainable growth : promoting a more efficient, greener and more competitive economy 3. Inclusive growth : fostering a high-employment economy delivering social and territorial cohesion
  • Employment rate of those (age 20-34) having left education and training no more than 3 years before reference year
  • 2011: Focus education outcomes more on labour market needs, including by improving access to higher education and by strengthening the effectiveness of the vocational training system. Take further measures to reduce early school-leaving by identifying, analysing and measuring its causes by 2012 and by setting up a monitoring &reporting mechanism on the success rate of the measures 2012: Take steps to reduce the high rate of ESL. Pursue policy efforts in the education system to match the skills required by the labour market. Enhance the provision and affordability of more childcare and out-of-school centres, with the aim of reducing the gender employment gap.
  • One Communication and seven Commission Staff Working Documents Education and Training Monitor Country analysis Assessment of Key Competences Partnerships and flexible pathways for LL skills development Supporting the teaching professions Language competences for employability, mobility and growth Vocational Education and Training for better skills, growth and jobs
  • European commission

    1. 1. Date: in 12 ptsEuropean Agenda forAdult LearningMartina Ní CheallaighEuropean CommissionMalta, 1 FebruaryMartina.NI-CHEALLAIGH@ec.europa.eu
    2. 2. Rationale and drivers• Gulf between adults skills profiles in Europe andmarket demand• Change (including technological change) andmanaging its effects on jobs & daily life• Demographic trend towards an ageing society• Bigger EU policy framework• EAC more recent policy & its significance for adultlearning
    3. 3. Skills mismatch: supply and demandEducationalattainmentSkills supply in 2011 Forecasted skills demand2020High 26.8% 35%Medium 46.6% 50%Low 26.6% 15%HighercompetencelevelsSkills + keycompetencesCompetences forall - equity
    4. 4. Demographics in the EU
    5. 5. A European strategy for smart,sustainable and inclusive growthMaking LLL and mobility a realityE&T quality and efficiencyEquity, social cohesion, active citizenshipEntrepreneurship, creativity and innovationEurope 2020 ET 2020Policy context
    6. 6. Seven flagship initiatives
    7. 7. Benchmarks for 2020• At least 95% of children between the age of 4 & theage for starting primary education in early childhoodeducation• Share of 15-years olds with insufficient abilities inreading, mathematics & science less than 15%• Share of early leavers from education and trainingless than 10%• Share of 30-34 year olds with tertiary educationalattainment at least 40%• Average of at least 15 % of adults (age group 25-64)participating in lifelong Learning
    8. 8. Progress towards EU benchamarksPRIORITY BENCHMARKEU AVERAGE2006EU AVERAGE2011Early school leaving 10% 15,5% 13,5%Tertiary Attainment 30-34 40% 28,9% 34,6%Early Childhood education 95% 89,3% 92,3%Employment rate (age 20-34) - Employability82% 79,0% 77,2%Adult participation inlearning15% 9,5% 8,9%Basic skills 15% R 23,1%M 24%S 20,3R 19,6%M 22,2%S 17,7%
    9. 9. Participation by ageParticipation in education and training in 2010 by age EU27 - %Source: Eurostat Labour Force Survey (Last update: 2011)15,27,44,59,10,02,04,06,08,010,012,014,016,0From 25 to 34 years From 35 to 44 years From 45 to 54 years From 55 to 64 years
    10. 10. European Agenda for Adult Learning
    11. 11. Agenda for Adult Learning – priority areas• Making lifelong learning and mobility a reality• Improving the quality and efficiency ofeducation and training• Promoting equity, social cohesion and activecitizenship through adult learning• Enhancing the creativity and innovation ofadult and their learning environments• Improving the knowledge base on adultlearning and monitoring the adult learningsector
    12. 12. Date: in 12 ptsVision of adult learning by 2020 Access to high quality learning any time in life forpersonal, social and economic ends Awareness of each adult /each employer Fairly shared responsibility, adequate resourcing Learner / learning outcomes at centre supportedby guidance, validation, flexible provisions Learning locally with a significant role for socialpartners, civil society and local authorities Active learning for seniors and mutual learning &solidarity between generationsEducation andCulture
    13. 13. Date: in 12 ptsContinuity• Building on the achievements of the ActionPlan, 2008-10 & its focus on low-skilled anddisadvantaged groups & their basic skills• Developing the adult learning sector –currently the weakest link in the LLL chain• Renewed focus on increasing participation,especially of those furthest from learning• Working as part of the OMC to exchangegood practice and experience amongcountries Education andCulture
    14. 14. Date: in 12 ptsComplementarity• Copenhagen process / Bruges Communiqué• Bologna process & modernisation of highereducation• Modernisation of schools: influences from non-formal sector• Offering compensatory route/second chance toearly school leavers• Assisting early childhood education throughimproved parental education• Intergenerational learning & exchangeEducation andCulture
    15. 15. Date: in 12 ptsConsolidation• Emphasis on low skilled/low qualified groups &taking their basic skills „one step up“• Stronger emphasis on implementation withinMember States (national, regional and local level)as well as through EU-level activities• Effective liaison with all stakeholders: ministries,social partners, business, NGOs, civil society• Nomination of a national coordinator to steerimplementation, launch cooperation with othercountries and liaise with the CommissionEducation andCulture
    16. 16. Commission contribution to the priorities ofthe Agenda• Awareness-raising• Literacy and other basic skills• Quality of the provision• Financing adult learning• Validation of non-formal and informal learning• Older people – learning for active ageing• Access to higher education• Data on adult learning
    17. 17. The case of MaltaChallengesLow LLL participation ratesHigh early school leavingHigh numbers of low skilled adults, & PISA 16 year oldsNeed to develop partnership, monitoring and evaluationPositivesNQF, LO approach & validation arrangements in placeMinistry responsible for education and employmentQualifications body in placeSmall country, contacts with stakeholders easier
    18. 18. Annual Growth SurveyRecommendations to Malta2011- 2012• Focus education outcomes more on labour marketneeds• improving access to higher education• strengthening the effectiveness of the VET system•Take further measures to reduce early school-leaving•Enhance the provision and affordability of morechildcare and out-of-school centres
    19. 19. What is Rethinking Education?• An evidence based outline for reform of E&T,implementing the Agenda for new skills andjobs• Focusing on the supply of skills• Reinforcing and complementing theEmployment and Youth Employment packages• Supported by policy guidance documentsdeveloped through the Open Method ofCoordination• Product of a broad consultation
    20. 20. The highlights of the Communication1. Building skills for the 21st century Transversal skills, especiallyentrepreneurship Technology driven skills (STEM) Basic skills Vocational Education and Training Systems
    21. 21. The highlights of the Communication2. Stimulating open and flexible learningImproving the learning outcomes approach,assessment and recognitionExploiting the potential of ICT and OpenEducational ResourcesSupporting the teaching professions
    22. 22. The highlights of the Communication3. Promoting a collaborative effort Funding education through efficientinvestment Partnerships between public and privateinstitutions
    23. 23. New Commission initiatives asfollow up• Closer alignment of European skills/qualifications tools• Funding Education for Growth• Opening up Education – ICT and OER• Action plan to address skills shortages in growth sectors• A new language benchmark• Partnerships between Education, enterprises & research,promoted through new programme• Guidance framework for entrepreneurial education institutions• Enhanced support to Member States – Monitoring of progress,OMC, OECD collaboration…
    24. 24. Recommendation on ValidationHave in place arrangements for validation of non-formal andinformal learning, no later than 2018, thus :•facilitating a better match between skills and labour demand,addressing skills shortages in growing sectors•promoting better transferability of skills between companies andsectors•helping citizens move around the EU to study and work•Increasing motivation for lifelong learning, particularly amongeconomically disadvantaged or low-qualified
    25. 25. Date: in 12 ptsLifelong learningprogrammeThanks for your attention!GRAZZI!Contact: martina.ni-cheallaigh@ec.europa.euDG EAC: http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-policy/adult_en.htm

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