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Grassroots Media for Social Change Webinar
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Grassroots Media for Social Change Webinar

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On April 10th, CARE hosted a special webinar on how to use media to raise awareness about global poverty and mobilize your network and members of Congress to take action.

On April 10th, CARE hosted a special webinar on how to use media to raise awareness about global poverty and mobilize your network and members of Congress to take action.

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    Grassroots Media for Social Change Webinar Grassroots Media for Social Change Webinar Presentation Transcript

    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 1 State of the Media Industry • Newspapers continue to face shrinking resources • There is less coverage on global news and events • LTEs that once ran in print may now be online • Opportunity: As more publications expand their online, there is more room for LTEs, commentary and blogs
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 2 LTE: Why it matters? Your Story in a LTE Congressional Staffer or Member sees it Influence their policy agenda; better understanding of constituent needs • Members and staffers will track local media coverage and this includes LTEs • Some older Members of Congress actually prefer LTEs in print because they still get a newspaper subscription • LTEs allow you to tell your story in a very public way
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 3 How to Find a LTE opportunity Create a Google Alert Make sure to include the topic you are looking for and the name of the publication You can customize to create daily or weekly alerts Subscribe and read your daily newspaper Visit your local publication’s website routinely Get to know the reporter bylines
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 4 What goes inside a LTE? Componen ts of a LTE Description Length Most LTE’s are between 150 and 300 words. Check the individual news outlets for exact length. State the news article Be sure to state the news article that you are responding to. Give a position on the article – Did you agree or disagree with it? State your opinion What is the problem that concerns you? What is your position? Explain How this problem affects you or others, and explain what will happen if something is/isn’t done? Evidence Provide at least 1 piece of evidence for your assertion. Cite CARE Be sure to cite CARE in the body of your letter. You can mention a CARE example or that you’re a CARE advocate. Signature Sign the letter. Provide your full name, mailing address, email address and phone number
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 5 Tips and Tricks Be timely. Hook your letter to something that’s happening in the news. Stick to the facts. Personal attacks on policymakers are not effective. Go local. You can go local in your analysis even when the issue you’re tackling is national in Scope. Provide evidence and context. Don’t assume your audience is familiar with the issue. Tailor each letter to the outlet’s audience. Do your research. Read letters in your target publications on a regular basis to get a sense of each outlet’s style and approach. Follow up with the editorial board page. If you submit a letter and it isn’t accepted, follow up once with the editorial board page.
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 6 Op-eds vs. LTEs Op-Eds • More difficult to write; about 650 to 1,000 words • More difficult to place because there is less room for op-eds than LTEs • Requires editing by the publication editor • Requires a very compelling personal story or local hook for successful placement • Requires more follow up with editors LTEs • Shorter pieces • Easier to place because there tends to be more room, especially if it runs online • Easier to write • Usually doesn’t require editing from the publication
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 7 When a LTE doesn’t place… Try again! Hang onto that letter and wait for another article to run that relates to the letter. Since LTEs are pretty short, it’s not a huge lift to revise it. Look for community forums online. Sometimes community forums allow readers to resister and post their opinions. Try to find alternative outlets to place the LTE. Sometimes publications get very picky about which LTEs to accept. Make sure you’re exploring a variety of different publications in your community and trying out different editors.
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 8 My LTE placed! What’s next? Tell CARE and we can share with our networks Share on Social Media Share with your Member of Congress
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 9 Success Stories
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 10 How Can Social Media Build a Movement?
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 11 • 64% of Congressional senior managers think Facebook is an important tool for understanding constituents’ views and opinions. • 42% said the same about Twitter • Facebook deemed more important for understanding constituents’ views and opinions than form communications, online surveys and polls and online town hall meetings *Data from http://www.congressfoundation.org/news/press-releases/922-social-media-used- extensively-by-congress What’s the importance of social media in a congressional office?
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 12*Data from http://www.congressfoundation.org/news/press-releases/922-social-media-used-extensively-by- congress What’s the importance of social media in a congressional office?
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 13 Find your Member of Congress on Social Media • Look for the icons on their official website • Look for the blue check on Twitter • Use your best judgment on Facebook
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 14 How Can You Start a Movement? Let’s focus here• Social media is the #1 activity on the web • 68% of people will learn more about a charity if they see a friend posting about it on social media 23% of Facebook users check their account five or more times every day • 25% of smart phone owners ages 18-44 can’t recall the last time their phone wasn’t at their side
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 15 Connect Educate Call to Action Follow up How Can You Start a Movement?
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 16 Connect • Ask questions • Comment on other users’ content • Share other users’ content • Engage in meaningful conversation • Prove you want to build a relationship, not a sounding board
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 17 • Petitions http://www.care.org/get- involved/advocacy/petitions • Advocacy http://www.care.org/work/advocacy • CARE Action Network http://www.care.org/get- involved/advocacy/care-action-network • Our work http://www.care.org/work Educate – care.org
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 18 Educate – other tools • Read your emails from CARE and follow us on social media • Watch for important hashtags from CARE and others • Watch keywords with Google Alerts and Hootsuite
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 19 Encourage Action – tell them EXACTLY what you want them to do 41 Retweets 104 Signatures
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 20 Encourage Action – use current news and events to frame your issue
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 21 Encourage Action – make it urgent… even when it’s not
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 22 Encourage Action – Make it about THEM
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 23 Follow up with your supporters…
    • © 2005, CARE USA. All rights reserved. Page 24 …and Members of Congress @MOC Thx for co- sponsoring/signing/supporting/listeni ng/meeting on behalf of @CARE • Thank them when they co- sponsor legislation • Thank them for taking the time to listen or meet with you • Tag @CARE in your tweet, so it will reach even more people! Image courtesy of Stuart Miles/FreeDigitalPhotos.net