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Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
Research 6 job profile creative media
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Research 6 job profile creative media

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  • 1. Job profile: advertising media planner<br />Overview<br />It is the advertising media planner's responsibility to decide which kinds of media will convey the advertiser's message most effectively.<br />Work activities<br />working with the advertising agency's account executive and the client<br />understanding target audiences and their habits<br />researching the readership of magazines and newspapers, viewing figures for television programmes and other information<br />deciding which media to use for specific advertising campaigns<br />deciding on the most appropriate time to run adverts<br />liaising with the creative teams that produce advertising material<br />presenting proposals and cost schedules to clients for their approval<br />working with a media buyer to negotiate the cost and booking of advertising space with media owners - much of this work is done by telephone<br />building good working relationships with clients and media owners<br />meeting deadlines and working within a budget.<br />Knowledge<br />an understanding of the role the media plays in advertising<br />knowledge of different media and their audiences<br />understanding of consumer media consumption behaviors<br />Skills<br />research<br />flair for business and commerce<br />teamwork<br />interpersonal skills<br />good written and spoken communication skills<br />active listening<br />comfortable working with numbers and statistics<br />analytical skills<br />evaluation skills<br />computer literate <br />negotiating skills <br />able to work under pressure and meet deadlines <br />Curiosity, ability to use figures to paint a picture, strategic thinking and the ability to communicate.<br />Behaviours and personal qualities <br />be well organized and pay attention to detail <br />Have a confident telephone manner. <br />have creative appreciation <br />interested in why consumers behave in certain ways<br />Job profile: animator<br />Overview<br />Animators produce images that appear to come to life on screen.<br />Full Description<br />Their work is found in feature films, commercials, pop videos, computer games, websites and other media. They may work with drawings, specialist software or models and puppets, capturing separate images of each stage of a movement. When the images are viewed at speed the character appears to move. <br />Skills associated with this job<br />Animators usually work normal office hours, although they may work additional hours to meet deadlines. Many animators work freelance, and part-time and temporary contracts are common. Animators usually work in well-lit offices or studios. Working on stop frame animation may involve standing for long periods under hot studio lights. Other types of animation demand long hours sitting at a drawing board or computer.<br />Salaries may range from around £19,440 to upwards of £26,120 a year. Freelance animators may not always be in full-time employment so their income may vary.<br />An animator should:<br />be creative and artistic <br />have drawing skills (and sculpting skills for stop frame animation using clay) <br />have excellent IT skills <br />be patient and able to concentrate for long periods <br />be interested in art and design.<br />Around 3,000 people work in animation in the UK and about 300 companies employ animators. The main centres for this work are London, Bristol, Manchester and Dundee. Although there are some permanent jobs, many animators work on a freelance basis. Competition for jobs is keen and they are not always advertised, so networking is an important way of finding work.<br />Most animators have a degree or an HNC/HND. Animation courses are offered at universities and colleges throughout the UK. Admissions tutors usually expect to see a strong portfolio of work and, if possible, examples of animation projects. A show-reel of previous work is essential to show to potential clients and employers.<br />Animators normally train on the job, working with more experienced colleagues to learn and develop new techniques and skills. It is essential for animators to keep up to date with new developments in the industry, and there are many relevant short courses.<br />As many animators are self-employed, career progression depends on their skills, versatility and ability to promote themselves. With experience, animators may become lead animators or animation directors. They may also move into specialist areas such as animation special effects. There may be opportunities to work overseas or to teach animation.<br />What is the work like?<br />Animation is the art of making images that appear to come to life on screen. It features in all kinds of media, from feature films to commercials, pop videos, computer games and websites. Animators use a range of techniques to make images appear to move, and most specialise in one of the following:<br />2D drawn animation <br />2D computer animation <br />stop frame or stop motion animation <br />3D computer generated (CG) animation.<br />2D drawn animation consists of a series of images which the animator draws on special paper. Each image represents one stage of a movement, for example, of a character walking or smiling. Traditionally the images are traced onto film and coloured. Scenery is then added by layering sheets of film. Increasingly, however, the images are scanned into a computer and coloured using specialist software. When viewed at speed and in sequence the images appear to move.<br />In 2D computer animation, the animator works with a specialist software package which is used to create and animate characters, and add scenery and a soundtrack.<br />Stop frame or stop motion animation uses models, puppets or other 3D objects. The model is photographed, then moved a fraction by the animator and photographed again. When the photographs (or frames) are played at normal speed, the images appear to move.<br />3D CG animation uses specialist software to create animations. This technique is often used in feature films and computer games.<br />The work can be extremely painstaking and time consuming, but animators are expected to meet deadlines and production schedules.<br />Although some animators create their own characters and stories, others follow a brief from a director, animation director or key animator. Often they work with established characters and layouts.<br />The starting salary for a newly-qualified animator may be from around £19,440 a year.<br />Hours and environment<br />Animators usually work normal office hours for 35 to 40 hours a week, although they may work additional hours to meet deadlines. Many animators work freelance, and part-time and temporary contracts are common.<br />Animators usually work in well-lit offices or studios. Working on stop frame animation may involve standing for long periods under hot studio lights. Other types of animation demand long hours sitting at a drawing board or computer. Freelance animators are likely to spend some time travelling to meet clients and promote their work.<br />Skills and personal qualities<br />An animator should:<br />be creative and artistic <br />have drawing skills (and sculpting skills for stop frame animation using clay) <br />have excellent IT skills <br />be patient and able to concentrate for long periods <br />pay attention to detail <br />be observant and understand how people move and express emotions <br />have good communication and negotiation skills <br />have good organisational skills <br />be original and inventive <br />work well as part of a team and be able to take direction from senior animators, directors and clients <br />be able to follow a brief and work on their own initiative <br />take criticism well <br />work well under pressure and to strict deadlines.<br />Interests<br />It is important to:<br />be interested in art and design <br />be interested in film and television <br />enjoy using computer technology<br />Getting in<br />Around 3,000 people work in animation in the UK. About 300 companies are involved in animation, including small production companies, larger studios, CG post-production facility houses, computer games developers and interactive media designers. The main centres are London, Bristol, Manchester and Dundee. Although there are some permanent jobs in animation, many animators work on a freelance or contract basis. The computer games industry is a particular growth area in the sector. Competition is keen.<br />Many vacancies and opportunities are not advertised by conventional methods. Networking is an important way of making contacts and finding work. Some vacancies may be advertised in The Guardian and in specialist magazines such as Creative Review and Design Week.<br />Entry for young people<br />Most animators have a degree or an HNC/HND.<br />Many universities and colleges throughout the UK offer courses in animation and other relevant art and design courses. Skillset, in consultation with the industry and education providers, has endorsed the following courses:<br />HND in Art & Design (Computer Animation) and Degree in Animation at the Glamorgan Centre for Art & Design <br />Degree in Animation Production at the Arts Institute at Bournemouth <br />Degree in Computer Visualisation and Animation at Bournemouth University <br />Degree in Animation at the University of Wales, Newport <br />Degree in Animation at University College for the Creative Arts at Farnham <br />Degree in Computer Animation at the University of Teesside.<br />Other courses are currently being evaluated. Applicants should contact Skillset for more information.<br />Entry requirements vary and candidates are advised to check with individual institutions. However, in general, in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, many people do a foundation course in art and design before starting a degree course. Typical qualifications required are five GCSEs/S grades (A-C/1-3), and sometimes an A level/H grade.<br />In Scotland, many degree courses last four years, with an introductory year rather than an art foundation year.<br />For degree courses, applicants usually need a minimum of two A levels/three H grades and five GCSEs/S grades (A-C/1-3), or equivalent qualifications.<br />For HND courses, typical entry requirements are one A level/two H grades in art and design subjects, or a BTEC national certificate/diploma in a relevant subject, or equivalent.<br />Admissions tutors usually expect to see a strong portfolio of work and, if possible, examples of animation projects.<br />There are also postgraduate degrees and diplomas for candidates with a good first degree in a relevant subject.<br />Prospective employers and clients generally expect to see a show-reel of previous work as well as still shots, and a portfolio of life drawings and movement studies.<br />Entry for adults<br />Universities and colleges may accept mature entrants if they can demonstrate a genuine interest in the subject and a strong portfolio of work. The normal requirements may not be enforced for mature applicants. Adults may prepare for a degree by taking an Access course.<br />Older entrants may succeed if they have a strong and relevant portfolio of work.<br />Training<br />Animators normally receive training on the job, working with more experienced colleagues to learn and develop new techniques and skills.<br />It is essential for animators to keep up to date with new developments in the industry, particularly with regard to software relevant to their field of animation. The Skillset website has a directory of short courses available in the UK. Freelance animators usually fund their own training.<br />Getting on<br />As many animators are self-employed, career progression depends on their skills, versatility and ability to promote themselves.<br />New animators may start as 'inbetweeners' (producing the drawings that are used in between key poses) or junior animators. With experience, they may progress to assistant animator, animator, lead animator and animation director. There may also be opportunities to work in specialist roles such as animation special effects.<br />There may be opportunities to work overseas or, with an appropriate teaching qualification, to teach animation.<br />Job profile: art editor<br />Overview<br />Art editors are responsible for the way a magazine looks. They present the words and images in a way that is easy for the reader to digest, with high visual impact<br />Full Description<br />The job covers all aspects of layout, design and photography and may include:<br />laying out pages for the magazine, often to tight deadlines <br />discussing design and layout ideas with the editor and other colleagues <br />commissioning photographers and illustrators <br />sketching out and designing the cover - which must always look distinctive to attract buyers <br />anticipating trends and setting the magazine's overall visual style <br />controlling the art budget.<br />Skills associated with this job<br />Specialised computer software is used to design magazines. The art editor may do some of this personally, and may also oversee a team of designers and art workers.<br />Art editors generally work normal office hours, but may need to work extra hours at times. They work in offices or design studios.<br />Salaries may start at around £22,000 for a trainee art editor, and rise as high as £70,000 for a top art director.<br />Art editors have to be:<br />creative, with a highly-developed visual sense <br />adept with page design software and the internet <br />a strong communicator, able to brief others clearly on what is needed <br />confident in presenting ideas <br />interested in magazine trends and graphic design.<br />Art editors are employed on consumer and business magazines throughout the UK. There are many opportunities, but competition for art editor posts can be fierce. An impressive portfolio of creative work is at least as important as qualifications.<br />Most art editors start out as graphic designers or art workers. There are no set qualifications, but most entrants have a degree or an HNC/HND in graphic design, illustration or a similar subject. A foundation course in art and design can provide a good start. Mature entry is possible for those with experience in publishing or graphic design and knowledge of software programs.<br />Most training is done on the job. Art editors must keep up to date with developments in graphic design, including new software. Several professional organisations offer regular courses and conferences.<br />Art editors working for larger publishers may be promoted to art director or move to work on a higher profile magazine. Some may become self-employed, or move into related areas such as advertising or interactive media design.<br />What is the work like?<br />Art editors are responsible for the way a magazine looks. They present the words and images in a way that is easy for the reader to digest, with high visual impact.<br />In the highly competitive consumer magazine market, the art editor's role is essential to the success of a publication. The magazine's cover, in particular, must always look distinctive, to attract potential buyers.<br />The job covers all aspects of layout, design and photography.<br />Day-to-day tasks may include:<br />laying out pages for the magazine, often to tight deadlines <br />discussing design and layout ideas with the editor and other colleagues <br />commissioning and briefing photographers on the style and format of shots required <br />commissioning illustrators to produce any graphics needed <br />choosing the best images to use, either from commissioned pictures or stock library photography <br />drafting rough sketches of the cover design for discussion, then producing the final layout <br />ensuring that the art elements of the magazine are delivered on time and within budget. <br />On a broader level, the art editor is responsible for: <br />setting the magazine's overall visual style <br />establishing design templates - so that the magazine always has a recognisable look, no matter who lays out the pages <br />anticipating trends, and presenting proposals to make sure the magazine's design does not become stale <br />redesigning the magazine for relaunch.<br />Almost all page design is done on computer. Specialised design software is used. Art editors now use the latest technology to send pages directly to press.<br />In some companies the art editor may do most of the layout personally. On larger publications, he or she leads and trains a team of designers and art workers.<br />Art editors must liaise closely with colleagues and freelance contributors, including writers, sub-editors and photographers.<br />Salaries for trainee art editors may start at around £22,000 a year.<br />Hours and environment<br />An art editor generally works typical office hours, Monday to Friday. Extra hours are sometimes required, especially when the magazine is due to go to press.<br />The work is based in an office or design studio. Most work is done on a computer screen.<br />Art editors may travel to oversee photography sessions or attend meetings.<br />Skills and personal qualities<br />An art editor needs to be:<br />creative, with a highly-developed visual sense <br />adept with page design software and the internet <br />a strong communicator, able to brief others clearly on what is needed <br />confident in presenting ideas <br />attentive to detail <br />good at working in a team <br />well organised <br />unfazed by criticism <br />cool and effective under pressure <br />able to manage budgets.<br />Interests<br />It is important to have an interest in:<br />changing trends in magazine publishing <br />graphic design and typography.<br />Getting in<br />Around 3,330 art editors work on UK consumer publications. Business magazines employ a further 2,500 art editors, some of whom work on more than one title.<br />Magazine publishers are based in major towns and cities across the UK. By far the biggest concentration is in London and the South East.<br />The magazine business is booming. New titles launch and others fold all the time. The growth of online publications has also boosted opportunities. However, competition for posts can still be fierce.<br />An impressive portfolio of creative work is at least as important as qualifications. It is a good idea to get some work experience with a relevant employer or experience on a student magazine before looking for a job.<br />Vacancies are found in the trade press, such as Design Week and Media Week, or national newspapers such as The Guardian (Mondays). Some jobs in design and publishing are filled through specialist recruitment agencies that match people with vacancies.<br />Entry for young people<br />Most art editors start out in a more junior role, eg as a magazine designer or art worker.<br />There are no specific qualifications for entry to this field. In practice, however, most art editors have a degree, a Foundation degree or an HNC/HND. The most relevant subjects are graphic design, illustration or similar subjects.<br />There are many of these courses at universities and art colleges across the UK:<br />for a degree, the requirements are usually two A levels/three H grades and five GCSEs/S grades (A-C/1-3), or equivalent qualifications<br />for HNCs/HNDs, students need one A level/two H grades in art and design subjects, a BTEC national certificate/diploma in a relevant subject, or equivalent qualifications<br />for BTEC national diplomas or certificates, students need four GCSEs/S grades (A-C/1-3)<br />it is possible to take a year-long foundation course in art and design, which will build up a portfolio of work that helps gain a place on a degree or diploma course.<br />It is possible to study to postgraduate level in specialised areas of graphic design and related subjects. Students normally need a first degree in an appropriate subject.<br />Entry for adults<br />It is important to have a track record and portfolio in a relevant area, such as publishing or graphic design, as well as up-to-date knowledge of computer software programs.<br />Training<br />Most training is done on the job. It is essential for art editors to keep up to date with new trends in the field, and with innovations in software. Employers may sponsor training courses in these areas.<br />Professional organisations, such as D&AD and the Periodicals Training Council, offer regular courses, workshops and networking events for members.<br />Art editors may apply for membership of the Chartered Society of Designers (CSD). Membership is awarded on the basis of an assessment of work completed. CSD offers a programme of Continuing Professional Development for members.<br />Getting on<br />Art editors working for larger publishers may be promoted to art director. They may advance by moving to a managerial role, or a higher-profile publication within the company's suite of magazines.<br />In smaller companies, promotion opportunities can be limited and advancement may mean finding a job with a different company.<br />With further training, it may be possible to move into a related field, such as advertising or interactive media design.<br />Experienced art editors with good industry contacts may become self-employed or set up their own design agency.<br />Job profile: event and exhibition organiser<br />Overview<br />Event and exhibition organisers are responsible for planning events and ensuring that they run as smoothly as possible. They work on public events, trade and industry exhibitions, product launches, company events and private events such as weddings.<br />Full Description<br />The work may include:<br />liaising closely with clients <br />finding and booking venues <br />planning room layouts, timetables, workshops and special demonstrations <br />selling stands and exhibition space to exhibitors <br />arranging other services and facilities, eg catering and entertainment. <br />Skills associated with this job<br />Event and exhibition organisers usually work from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. However, in preparation for, and during an event, they need to be flexible and often work long, unsociable hours. They work indoors and outdoors, in all weather conditions. Most major exhibition venues are modern, light and well-ventilated. <br />Event and exhibition organisers may earn from around £16,000 to £60,000 a year. <br />They should:<br />be well-organised, efficient and pay close attention to detail <br />have excellent communication skills <br />be imaginative and creative <br />be able to cope with pressure and tight deadlines <br />be interested in the events industry and keeping up to date with changing facilities and technology.<br />This is a growing industry, with an increasing number of cities in the UK developing and upgrading venues to stage events, exhibitions and conferences. The largest venues and events agencies are in the major cities, although venues may be found throughout the country. There is a high demand for people to work in this field, but there is also strong competition, with more applicants than vacancies.<br />Although there are no set entry requirements for event and exhibition organisers, many have a degree or an HND. Knowledge of foreign languages is useful. Equally important is experience of organising events, whether this is gained through voluntary work or work experience.<br />There are a large number of training courses available, covering all aspects of the events industry. Event and exhibition organisers also gain additional skills and knowledge on the job and by working alongside more experienced colleagues.<br />There is no clear promotion route for event and exhibition organisers. Experience is vital and can lead to opportunities to manage larger events, bigger budgets and higher profile clients. It may be possible for organisers to move into a role such as team leader, or event or exhibition manager, or take on wider management responsibilities.<br />What is the work like?<br />Event and exhibition organisers are responsible for planning events and ensuring that they run as smoothly as possible. They work on:<br />public events, such as the Ideal Home Exhibition or Chelsea Flower Showtrade and industry exhibitions <br />product launches <br />special company events such as team away days or annual general meetings (AGMs) <br />private events such as parties and weddings. <br />The organiser's exact role depends on the type of event and the organisation they are working for. Dedicated event or exhibition management companies and in-house teams often offer a complete service, while smaller venues and agencies may sub-contract much of the work. <br />The work may include:<br />liaising closely with clients <br />finding and booking venues <br />planning room layouts, timetables, workshops and special demonstrations <br />selling stands and exhibition space to exhibitors arranging other facilities, eg catering, entertainment, toilets, security and insurance cover <br />publicising the event, liaising with the press and organising promotional material, eg <br />flyers, posters and programmes <br />finding accommodation for delegates and exhibitors <br />ensuring health and safety requirements are met <br />managing sub-contractors <br />dealing with queries from exhibitors and visitors <br />ensuring that the event is concluded and the venue cleared on time <br />post-event evaluation with the client.<br />The starting salary for an event and exhibition organiser may be around £16,000 a year.<br />Hours and environmentEvent and exhibition organisers usually work from 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. However, in preparation for, and during an event, they need to be flexible and often work long, unsociable hours, including evenings and weekends.<br />Depending on their exact role, organisers divide their time between working in an office, visiting venues (both to assess new facilities and attend actual events) and meeting clients. This may result in lengthy periods away from home, and foreign travel is sometimes required.<br />A driving licence is an advantage.<br />Organisers work indoors and outdoors in all weather conditions. Most major indoor exhibition venues are modern, light and well-ventilated. Smaller exhibitions are held in hotels, halls or in venues such as museums. Outdoor venues range from showgrounds and racecourses with permanent facilities, to fields, parks and seafronts.<br /> <br />Skills and personal qualities<br />An event and exhibition organiser should:<br />be well-organised and efficient <br />pay close attention to detail <br />have excellent communication skills <br />be imaginative and creative <br />be able to cope with pressure and tight deadlines <br />be customer-focused <br />work with diplomacy and tact <br />have a sense of humour <br />have good business, marketing, negotiating and selling skills <br />be able to multi-task <br />be able to lead a team, supervise and delegate tasks <br />have good project-management and problem-solving skills <br />be flexible and able to deal with last-minute changes or problems <br />have IT and numeracy skills <br />have stamina.<br />Interests<br />It is important to be interested in:<br />the events industry <br />keeping up to date with changing facilities and technology.<br />Getting in<br />This is a growing industry, with an increasing number of cities in the UK developing and upgrading venues to stage events, exhibitions and conferences.<br />The key employers are:<br />venues such as purpose-built conference and exhibition centres, hotel groups, universities and historic properties <br />specialist events agencies, most of which employ less than 20 people <br />large businesses with their own in-house teams.<br />The largest venues and events agencies are in major cities such as London, Glasgow and Manchester, although venues may be found throughout the country.<br />There is a high demand for people to work in this field, but there is also strong competition, with more applicants than vacancies. There are opportunities to work on a freelance basis.<br />Event and exhibition organisers sometimes find work through word of mouth or by personal recommendation. Jobs may also be advertised in local and national newspapers, and in trade magazines such as Event and Exhibition Bulletin.<br />The Association of Event Organisers (AEO) website, www.aeo.org.uk, has a careers section including job vacancies, as does the monthly newsletter of the Association for Conferences and Events (ACE).<br />Entry for young people<br />Although there are no set entry requirements for event and exhibition organisers, many have a degree or an HND. Knowledge of foreign languages is also useful. <br />Equally important is experience of organising events, whether this is gained through voluntary work or work experience.<br />There are a number of relevant qualifications available, at a variety of levels. These include:<br />Degrees in subjects such as event management, marketing and events management, conference and exhibition management, and events and conference management - the usual entry requirements are a minimum of five GCSEs/S grades (A-C/1-3) and two A levels/three H grades or equivalent.<br />Foundation Degree in Hospitality and Events Management - the usual entry requirements are a minimum of one A level/two H grades, or a BTEC national certificate/diploma in a relevant subject. <br />HND in Event Management - minimum entry qualifications are the same as for a Foundation degree. <br />Entry requirements may vary, so candidates should check with individual colleges or universities.<br />Entry for adults<br />Mature applicants are welcomed, particularly if they have previous experience of dealing with people and organising events.<br />Some institutions may accept mature applicants onto a degree course without the usual entry requirements, especially if they have relevant work experience.<br />Training<br />There are a large number of training courses available, covering all aspects of the events industry, from sponsorship to crowd safety. Many are run by professional organisations such as ACE and AEO, while the Society of Event Organisers (SEO) runs a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programme.<br />A number of private companies run industry specific training courses - a list is available from the British Association of Conference Destinations (BACD).<br />It may be possible to study towards NVQ Level 2 and 3 in Events or Events - Temporary Structures. Event and exhibition organisers also gain additional skills and knowledge on the job and by working alongside more experienced colleagues.<br />Postgraduate qualifications in subjects such as conference management are also available.<br />Getting on<br />There is no clear promotion route for event and exhibition organisers. Experience is vital and can lead to opportunities to manage larger events, bigger budgets and higher profile clients. It is common to move between agencies to progress.<br />It may be possible for organisers to move into a role such as team leader, or event or exhibition manager, or take on wider management responsibilities.<br />Freelance organisers establish themselves by organising events or exhibitions successfully and to a consistently high standard. Some organisers, with the right experience and contacts, may set up their own agencies.<br />There may be job opportunities overseas, especially if working for international exhibition or event management companies.<br />Job profile: human resources<br />Overview<br />Human resources or personnel management is about getting the best from the people in an organisation.<br />Full Description<br />Responsibilities<br />Human resources or personnel management is about getting the best from the people in an organisation. Human resources officers ensure that their organisation has the right people, in the right jobs, with the right skills and qualifications.<br />Large organisations employing many people often have a human resources or personnel department with a number of staff, each specialising in one of the areas below. <br />recruiting staff - producing job descriptions, placing advertisements, liaising with recruitment agencies, interviewing candidates and deciding who to employ <br />working with managers of other departments to decide future personnel needs <br />assessing the training and development needs of staff <br />providing, organising and or buying in staff training and development <br />making sure that staff pay and benefits are in line with legal requirements and the organisation's resources but also motivate staff <br />overseeing employee services like health and safety <br />counselling staff about problems at work and personal problems <br />advising management on matters like pay negotiations, disciplinary and grievance procedures, redundancy programmes, equal opportunities policy and employment law.<br />In smaller companies officers may deal with all aspects of the job.<br />Skills associated with this job<br />Work activities <br />dealing with correspondence <br />liaising with staff and managers <br />working with data and statistics <br />drawing up plans, policies and reports <br />designing and placing job adverts <br />short listing <br />interviewing <br />writing policies and procedures <br />negotiating <br />attending meetings <br />talking to large and small groups of people.<br />Knowledge <br />good commercial awareness <br />understand the organisation and its aims <br />understand and keep up to date with employment law.<br />Skills <br />good spoken and written communication skills <br />stay calm under pressure <br />cope with difficult situations, such as telling people that they are being made redundant <br />gather facts and statistics and make financial calculations <br />respect for confidentiality <br />good organisational skills <br />problem-solving skills <br />work well in a team <br />accuracy and attention to detail <br />use databases, spreadsheets, word processing and accounts packages <br />problem solving skills<br />Behaviours and personal qualities <br />patient, tactful, diplomatic and approachable <br />fairness and objectivity <br />flexible<br />Job profile: information technology staff<br />Overview<br />Design, install and maintain computer information systems and networks.<br />Full Description<br />Responsibilities<br />Information Technology (IT) staff design, install and maintain computerised information systems and computer networks, and make sure people can access information from the network when they need it. They are also responsible for installing and maintaining security systems that prevent unwanted users, 'hackers', from entering the system.<br />Networks give staff in an organisation access to common information and the internet, and allow them to transfer files electronically and communicate by email.<br />Initially, a network manager may have to:<br />advise on system selection and purchasing decisions <br />design and set up a network to suit their client's needs <br />write programmes that run the network and diagnose problems <br />set up user accounts and access, including passwords <br />train staff to use the hardware and software.<br />IT staff also ensure that file and folders systems operate effectively and that all system users are aware of protocols and trained to use the IT effectively and efficiently. <br />They work with managers to understand the organisational needs for a system and them commission and or purchase hardware and software that can deliver what the organisation needs.<br />IT staff will ensure that digital images are stored properly and are available to staff, including logos, and house styles. They will also be responsible for working with designers on the organisation website and may maintain the website or manage the contract for website maintenance.<br />Skills associated with this job<br />Work activities <br />Work activities vary subject to the environment and organisation but include some of the following: <br />provide technical support to solve hardware and software problems <br />answer questions from staff <br />monitor staff workloads and plan future staffing needs <br />monitor file use to make sure only authorised people are accessing particular files <br />back up files to ensure against loss of data <br />make sure adequate security is installed and working properly <br />manage disaster recovery operations in the event of a breakdown or crash <br />plan and implement future development.<br />Larger companies often employ several IT staff or managers, each working on a different area. In smaller companies, one or two people do all the network administration and maintenance. Network managers spend some time in meetings with other managers, sometimes at senior levels, and work closely with staff using the network. <br />Knowledge <br />Knowledge of IT systems, hardware and software <br />an awareness of the organisation's business needs <br />Skills <br />excellent IT skills <br />willingness to learn constantly about newly developing systems <br />able to think quickly and logically <br />good communication skills <br />able to communicate technical issues to non technicians <br />work with complex data, analyse it and use this to solve problems <br />good written and presentation skills <br />persuasion and negotiating <br />team player <br />organisation skills <br />able to maintain accurate records <br />research and analytical skills <br />able to work as a team member, but equally work without close supervision<br />Behaviours and personal qualities <br />interest in latest developments in computer hardware and software <br />enjoy solving problems, planning and project management <br />be accurate and pay attention to detail<br />

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