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  • 1. _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Report Information from ProQuest April 03 2014 20:28 _______________________________________________________________ 03 April 2014 ProQuest
  • 2. Table of contents 1. Art Schools: SCULPTURE........................................................................................................................... 1 03 April 2014 ii ProQuest
  • 3. Document 1 of 1 Art Schools: SCULPTURE Author: Anonymous ProQuest document link Abstract (Abstract): "I think everyone should study design and add beautiful sculptural elements to the world. For me, design is not sculpture or art-furniture or one-liners. Design is contemporary, innovative, smart, intelligent, beautiful, and experiential, and something that moves us forward. It is the machine of the material world and the agent of change. That's why my best designs function both as sculpture and as functional objects. They are sculpture to be used." "I started out studying photography at Ryerson University, but because the school also offers film and new- media streams, I began to play around with other media early on. For me, the movement between different forms and materials is an important part of solving conceptual problems. Some questions can only be addressed through sculpture or largescale installation, while others can be dealt with in a single photograph. A good studio-arts program exposes you to a range of ideas, but also allows you to socialize with other artists. It's often the first time you'll find yourself surrounded by people who have the same concerns and interests as you, which is amazing. But the most important part of those four years is that they allow you to figure out what your working process will look like as an artist. Each project helps you to hone your skills and shape your own personal process and, by the end of that time, you'll have all the tools you need to make work independently." "When I teach sculpture and installation, I like to think about it as a practice that addresses the way objects and human bodies coexist in the world. When you consider it this way, the medium becomes endlessly broad, as well as highly relevant to contemporary life. After studying sculpture, everyday actions like getting dressed in the morning, arranging furniture in a room, shopping or making anything with your hands become sculptural concerns, potentially loaded with social, political and historical meaning. My goal is to get students thinking about objects of interest to them in their own lives: how they are made, with what materials, who makes them, under what conditions and where those objects will end up in the environment. Experimenting by making things is the best way to develop critical analysis. In a sculpture program, thinking and making go hand-in-hand." Full text: Headnote Studying sculpture can prepare you for a role in shaping real-world transformations. Whether your interest lies in ceramics, textiles, installation, industrial design, architecture, or film and theatre production, an art or design degree can hone your skills and help you set your goals. Why Sculpture? Pioneers Sculpture has long been a cornerstone of artistic production, but growing interest in the practice is now helping to redefine what sculpture can be. From the landmark "Unmonumental" exhibition at the New Museum in New York to the publicart programs that are transforming the Canadian urban landscape, assemblage and installation works are at the forefront of contemporary art and art-making. As practices that centre on making and circulating objects, sculpture and design are literally all around us. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: 1. Students in York University's sculpture program pour bronze in the school's Odette Centre for Sculpture 2. A student in UBCs visual art program at work in the welding studio 3. Sculpture and fabrication studios at OCAD University 4. Mould-making in ACAD's sculpture studio 5. Two students from the Vancouver Film School compete in the 201 1 International Make-Up Artist Trade Show in Los Angeles 03 April 2014 Page 1 of 6 ProQuest
  • 4. "I think everyone should study design and add beautiful sculptural elements to the world. For me, design is not sculpture or art-furniture or one-liners. Design is contemporary, innovative, smart, intelligent, beautiful, and experiential, and something that moves us forward. It is the machine of the material world and the agent of change. That's why my best designs function both as sculpture and as functional objects. They are sculpture to be used." THE AWARD-WINNING DESIGNER KARIM RASHID COMPLETED HIS BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AT CARLETON UNIVERSITY. HE HAS DESIGNED MORE THAN 3,000 OBJECTS AND HIS WORK IS INCLUDED IN THE PERMANENT COLLECTIONS OF 14 MUSEUMS, INCLUDING MOMA AND THE CENTRE POMPIDOU. HE LIVES IN NEW YORK, WHERE HE RUNS HIS OWN DESIGN FIRM. What is sculpture? Star instructors from coast to coast define their practices "Sculpture is traditionally defined as a three-dimensional object, but that definition is widening and expanding all the time." - ADRIANA KUIPER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AT MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY "Sculpture is the silent key to the world we encounter every second of every day. You might say that sculpture is what is not painting or printmaking or performance or video, what is not photography or film or cyberspace. You might be right. But you may just as easily be wrong." - IAN CARR-HARRIS, PROFESSOR AT OCAD UNIVERSITY "I consider sculpture to be any proposition that doesn't have a fixed position for the viewer and that is only fully revealed through a process of physically moving around it." - CHRISTIAN GIROUX, PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH "Sculpture and installation art are modes of production that build relationships with the viewer and the site." - RITA MCKEOUGH, INSTRUCTOR AT THE ALBERTA COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN "In sculpture, as well as installation, everything is a possible material, and everywhere is a possible location. It's about paying close attention, conceptualizing, improvising, problem-solving." - VERONICA VERKLEY, INSTRUCTOR AT THE YUKON SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS BRENDAN LEE SATISH TANG "My introduction to art was at first very focused on twodimensional practices, such as painting and drawing, but I was always attracted to the three-dimensional because it was immersive: immersive for me, as an artist, and immersive for the viewer. I liked that the encounter with a sculptural object took place in the same space that the viewer occupies. It seemed to have a magical, transporting power. My decision to work with ceramics was kinesthetic - working with clay satiated me on a physical level in a way I hadn't experienced with other media. Art school helped to expose me to a variety of media, but, most importantly, it prepared me to think about context: what it means to make art now and in the future. A visual-arts degree is in many ways a critical-thinking degree. It prepares you to talk about working in a visual format. " BRENDAN LEE SATISH TANC IS A CERAMIC ARTIST WHO CURRENTLY RESIDES IN MEDICINE HAT, ALBERTA. HIS WORK HAS BEEN EXHIBITED INTERNATIONALLY AT GALLERIES INCLUDING THE POWER PLANT, THE MUSÉE D'ART CONTEMPORAIN DE MONTRÉAL AND THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY. Pick the Right School * Self-directed vs. structured: Many sculpture and design programs now encourage students to follow their impulses and to experiment with a variety of media, which can be great for those who seek independence. Structured programs, on the other hand, require you to develop a specific set of skills that might help you to transition into a trade or crafts career. * Staying home vs. moving away: By applying to a school that is close to home, you can can keep costs down and make appointments to speak with faculty and current students about the program before you enroll. While it 03 April 2014 Page 2 of 6 ProQuest
  • 5. may be more expensive, going to school in a different city can expose you to new ideas and experiences that will inform the kind of projects you make. * Big city vs. small town: Big cities offer a wider variety of art-viewing opportunities and give you the chance to connect with lots of people who are already working in your field. Smaller towns, on the other hand, often supply easier access to volunteer and work placements, and can allow for quieter and more focused studio time. * Facilities and space: Learning about sculpture and installation practices requires access to the right equipment and materials, as well as space in which to experiment. Be sure to consider the type of facilities each school offers - from foundries and woodworking equipment to kilns and rapid prototyping - as these resources will determine the kinds of projects you can make. Yukon School of Visual Arts sculpture student David Fraser improvises with found materials at the Dawson City Landfill Prepare a Winning Portfolio * Show your work in the best possible light: Unlike other practices, such as painting or drawing, sculpture and installation works need to be well documented to capture the experience of seeing them in person. Consider renting or borrowing high-quality camera equipment in order to document your work, and be sure to highlight the interactive or multi-sensory aspects of your practice. * Get advanced feedback: Many schools and colleges host portfolio feedback days once or twice a year that provide helpful advice on what admissions committees are looking for. Others take part in National Portfolio Day events, bringing together dozens of schools in one location. Check portfolioday.net or call your regional art college to find an event near you. * Go for breadth and depth: Admissions committees see hundreds of portfolios each year, so it's important that yours reflects the range and diversity of your practice. When compiling a survey of your best work, try to highlight your process and growth as an artist by including a variety of projects and approaches. Works that are inprogress and sketchbooks that chart your ideas are other great ways to showcase your process. * Take pride in your work: Artists are often their own harshest critics, but when you're applying for an art program, it's important to be confident about the strengths of your work and the contributions you can make to your field. Emphasize what makes your approach unique and prepare a portfolio of works that you're proud of. L'Université du Québec àMontreal's visual arts program provides students with a fully equipped wood workshop WILL GILL "I studied sculpture at Mount Allison University because I had grown up in Ottawa and needed to be in a new environment. I had no idea what to expect from a BFA program, but I knew that being creative excited me. I ended up majoring in sculpture and print-making because they were both mediums that relied heavily on materials and processes: often it was not about what you ended up with, but how you got there that mattered most. I liked troubleshooting and figuring out how things could be put together. The qualities of materials fascinated me. I found that perseverance was the most important thing after graduating. Finding ways to keep making work, and to be around other creative people, is vital as an artist." WILL GILL IS AN AWARD-WINNING VISUAL ARTIST WHO PRODUCES WORKS IN SCULPTURE, PAINTING, PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO. HE HAS PARTICIPATED IN EXHIBITIONS AT PEAK GALLERY AND EASTERN EDGE GALLERY AND IS PREMIERING A VIDEO AT THE SURREY ART GALLERY THIS WINTER. HE STUDIED SCULPTURE AT MOUNT ALLISON UNIVERSITY BEFORE MOVING TO ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND, WHERE HE LIVES. Think Laterally * Make friends: Your class- and studio-mates can be a valuable resource, both as school friends and as your future colleagues. Take the time to have studio visits with other students and faculty members and try to take classes with visiting artists who might introduce you to a new way of working or an interesting job opportunity. * Work across disciplines: Some of the most successful graduates of sculpture and design programs made a 03 April 2014 Page 3 of 6 ProQuest
  • 6. point of not only putting time into their studio work, but also spending time in disciplines outside of the visual arts - by taking courses in dance, film studies, engineering and even biology. Explorations in these other fields can introduce you to new audiences for your art and to cutting-edge technologies that can transform the way you make work. * Get involved in your field: Instructors say that students who come to school with a positive attitude and a passion for learning about their field are more likely to be successful after they graduate. Read magazines that will expose you to contemporary-art practices and the latest developments in your medium, and take advantage of the public lectures, exhibitions and sculpture biennials that are taking place in your area. * Be open to new possibilities: For many sculpture and design grads, there is no set career path when you complete your studies. Chart your own work trajectory by being open to new experiences and possibilities, including working in areas and media you are unfamiliar with. Kathleen Curwin and Melinda Poss observe Concordia (2011), an interactive installation created by the University of Waterloo engineering and sculpture students Joe Wang, Katarina Veljovlc and Michael Jeong Sculpture studio at the University of Waterloo ANNIE MACDONELL "I started out studying photography at Ryerson University, but because the school also offers film and new- media streams, I began to play around with other media early on. For me, the movement between different forms and materials is an important part of solving conceptual problems. Some questions can only be addressed through sculpture or largescale installation, while others can be dealt with in a single photograph. A good studio-arts program exposes you to a range of ideas, but also allows you to socialize with other artists. It's often the first time you'll find yourself surrounded by people who have the same concerns and interests as you, which is amazing. But the most important part of those four years is that they allow you to figure out what your working process will look like as an artist. Each project helps you to hone your skills and shape your own personal process and, by the end of that time, you'll have all the tools you need to make work independently." ANNIE MACDONELL IS A TORONTO-BASED VISUAL ARTIST WHOSE PRACTICE INCLUDES FILM, PHOTOGRAPHY, SCULPTURE, INSTALLATION AND SOUND. SHE SERVES ON THE BOARD OF GALLERY TPW AND TEACHES IN THE PHOTOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT AT RYERSON UNIVERSITY. HER WORK HAS BEEN EXHIBITED AT THE POWER PLANT AND THE ART GALLERY OF WINDSOR. KELLY JAZVAC "When I teach sculpture and installation, I like to think about it as a practice that addresses the way objects and human bodies coexist in the world. When you consider it this way, the medium becomes endlessly broad, as well as highly relevant to contemporary life. After studying sculpture, everyday actions like getting dressed in the morning, arranging furniture in a room, shopping or making anything with your hands become sculptural concerns, potentially loaded with social, political and historical meaning. My goal is to get students thinking about objects of interest to them in their own lives: how they are made, with what materials, who makes them, under what conditions and where those objects will end up in the environment. Experimenting by making things is the best way to develop critical analysis. In a sculpture program, thinking and making go hand-in-hand." KELLY JAZVAC WORKS IN SCULPTURE AND INSTALLATION. SHE HAS EXHIBITED NATIONALLY AND INTERNATIONALLY, INCLUDING RECENT PROJECTS AT LOUIS B. JAMES GALLERY, MUSEUM LONDON, NUIT BLANCHE AND DIAZ CONTEMPORARY. SHE IS BASED IN LONDON, ONTARIO, WHERE SHE IS AN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO. Build a Career * Use the tools at hand: Sculpture and installation programs will give you access to specialized equipment and expensive manufacturing tools that might be hard to find after you graduate. Graduates from across the country said that experimenting with new techniques and technologies was a key part of their art-school experience and an important way to prepare for an art practice after university. 03 April 2014 Page 4 of 6 ProQuest
  • 7. * Take your work public: In many programs, students are required to exhibit their final projects at university galleries or local artist-run centres. Graduates leave school with first-hand experience in mounting a show as well as an important accomplishment to include on their resumes. * Gain real-world experience: Many sculpture and design programs now offer work-study or internship placements that allow you to gain career experience while also receiving credit for your studies. These opportunities allow you to make new contacts and meet colleagues, and can help you find work after you graduate. * Be a multitasker: Use your time at art school not only to hone your sculpture and design work, but also to practice the skills that will make you employable in the future. Being able to write project proposals, to collaborate with others and to speak confidently about your work are important skills for any career path. Emily Carr student Jasmine Reimer working on her graduate project Catalyst: Soft upholstered sculpture that investigates the nature of the human body and the dynamic fullness of curves and fat (2009) Hot Jobs Sculpture and installation grads are finding exciting opportunities to work in a wide array of fields. From the art world to the realms of theatre, architecture and design, here is a list of hot jobs: Museum preparator: Since graduating with an MFA from the University of Western Ontario's visual arts program, Steven Laurie has worked as a collections assistant for the Art Gallery of York University and now assists with preparing and installing exhibitions as an associate project manager at the Royal Ontario Museum. Make-up and special-effects designer: Over the course of her studies in the Vancouver Film School's Makeup Design program, Leah Wilburn completed an internship at Masters FX Studios and worked at Breakfast Television. After graduating, she went on to take home the top prize in the Student Competition at the International Make-Up Artist Trade Show, and she has since been working as a freelance make-up designer. Artist: An alumna of OCAD University's sculpture and installation program, where she won top honours for her work in the department, Georgia Dickie has exhibited her pieces at Thrush Holmes Empire and, most recently, in the critically acclaimed group show "Chopped &Screwed" at MKG127 in Toronto. Art critic and curator: Jen Hutton received a BFA from the University of Guelph 's sculpture program before pursuing work as an art critic and curator. Having organized several successful exhibitions at Susan Hobbs Gallery, she is now pursuing an MFA in the writing program at the California Institute of the Arts. Prop master: Jennifer Rose Sciarrino studied photography at Ryerson University's School of Image Arts before beginning to explore sculpture and installation through her work as a prop maker for film and television productions. Her experimentation with three-dimensional practices at her day job prompted a new series of works that were recently exhibited at The Power Plant. Furniture designer: A graduate of Sheridan College's crafts and design program, Amy Keeler is now applying the skills she acquired during her studies to her work with Global Contract, a company that designs and manufactures custom-made office furnishings for a variety of international institutions. Prosthetic artist: Jay McClennen, who graduated from OCAD University, has built a successful career as a prosthetic artist for major films such as the X-Men series, Truman, Nixon and many others. Now a freelance anaplastologist, he creates realistic replacement body parts for cancer patients and assists with facial reconstruction projects for the Ontario Coroners Office and the Ontario Provincial Police. Design-firm owner: Shaun Moore studied furniture design in Sheridan College's crafts and design program before going on to found Toronto's MADE design firm with partner Julie Nicholson. The firm not only represents the work of 60 designers and artists, but also creates custom furniture, lighting and exhibition designs for clients from around the world. Set designer: After graduating with a BFA from York University's theatre program, Gillian Gallow launched her career as an award-winning set and costume designer, working with renowned theatre companies such as the Soulpepper, Canadian Stage and the Stratford Shakespeare Festival. 03 April 2014 Page 5 of 6 ProQuest
  • 8. "Entering a sculpture or installation program exposes you to a wide range of objectmaking techniques and multidisciplinary approaches to communicating ideas. These skills are highly valued." "It's important to use school as practice for maintaining a studio practice. During my studies at OCAD University, I was able to pay closer attention to the way that my own practice operates. " "The candid discussions that arose in class were formative to my writing, but, more importantly, making and discussing objects encouraged me to look deeply at how and why things are manufactured." "My professors showed me how valuable it is to be an open and flexible creator - a necessity in theatre, where each new production brings a unique set of collaborators and challenges." Subject: Art education; Sculpture; Guidelines; Art galleries & museums; Publication title: Canadian Art Volume: 28 Issue: 4 Pages: 47,50-52,56,58,60,64,68-69 Number of pages: 10 Publication year: 2012 Publication date: Winter 2012 Year: 2012 Section: SCULPTURE SMART GUIDE Publisher: Canadian Art Place of publication: Toronto Country of publication: Canada Publication subject: Art ISSN: 08253854 Source type: Magazines Language of publication: English Document type: Feature Document feature: Photographs ProQuest document ID: 914752678 Document URL: http://search.proquest.com.ezaccess.library.uitm.edu.my/docview/914752678?accountid=42518 Copyright: Copyright Canadian Art Winter 2012 Last updated: 2012-02-21 Database: Arts & Humanities Full Text _______________________________________________________________ Contact ProQuest Copyright © 2014 ProQuest LLC. All rights reserved. - Terms and Conditions 03 April 2014 Page 6 of 6 ProQuest