Fun with Words for Families
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Fun with Words for Families

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New Orleans Public Library customized slide deck for Every Child Ready to Read programs, from a template prepared by ALA in 2011 for ECRR.

New Orleans Public Library customized slide deck for Every Child Ready to Read programs, from a template prepared by ALA in 2011 for ECRR.

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  • [Instructions for presenters are in brackets and red type. Additional background information for this workshop is included in the Every Child Ready to Read ® (ECRR) 2 nd Edition Manual and CD. For this workshop, have an assortment of age-appropriate materials (ages two to five) nearby to use during the presentation: wordless picture books, predictable books, a variety of information books, books with nursery rhymes and poetry, riddle and joke books, and books by Dr. Seuss. Also have words to “Everything Has a Shape” by Hap Palmer or another song of your choice photocopied. If you want, have the tune available to play as you sing.] Information to present and points to make to the audience are in black type. Consider your community and audience as you present the workshop. The workshop is intended to be flexible, so that you can modify the presentation. For example, you can substitute books and activities that may have special meaning for the parents and children you expect to attend. Feel free to present information in your own words. [Presenter: Welcome parents and caregivers and introduce the workshop.] Points to make We are happy you are here. We are going to have fun together while we talk about how to start getting your child ready to read. You will leave with ideas you can begin to use today.
  • Presenter: You could ask the parents why they have come to the session before clicking on this slide or cover up part of the screen or slide. Explain that we are not teaching them how to teach their children to read, but to help their children become ready to learn when they start school—which can be lots of fun! Every Child Ready to Read is based on new knowledge about brain development, reading skills acquisition, and parenting. The practices that we are suggesting have been done by millions of parents for almost a hundred years and nowadays we have to encourage parents to do the same old hands-on work because no computer, no software, no smart toys will do nearly as much. The five practices are fun—and can be done by any parents and cost very very little money. They are habits that will bring a family closer and develop skills that the children need to develop early in life.
  • Points to make From the time they are infants, children learn language and other important skills that will help them learn to read. [Presenter: Ask audience members the ages of their children.] Whether your child is four days old or four years old, it’s not too early or too late to help him or her develop important literacy and pre-reading skills. Developing early literacy skills now will make it easier for your child to learn to read when he or she starts school. You can help your child learn language and other early literacy skills with simple activities. These are easy to make part of your everyday routine and fun for both you and your child.
  • Points to make Children’s reading success in kindergarten and beyond begins with positive language and literacy experiences from the time they are infants. If children develop pre-reading skills before they start kindergarten, they can focus on learning to read once they begin school. Children who start kindergarten ready to learn to read have greater success throughout their school years. They are more likely to read at or above grade level by the end of 2nd grade. Children who read at or above grade level by the end of 4th grade are much more likely to graduate from high school and be successful readers and learners throughout their lives.
  • Points to make You have been your child’s teacher from the day he or she was born. You know more about your child than anyone else. You are in the best position to help your child get ready to read because: Young children have short attention spans. You can do activities for short bits of time throughout the day. You can help your children learn in ways and at times that are best for them. Parents are tremendous role models—if your children see that you think reading is important and enjoy it, they will follow your lead. Children learn best by doing—and they love doing things with YOU.
  • Points to make We are going to talk about five of the best ways to help children learn pre-reading skills and get ready to read. These five practices are easy to do with children of all ages. They can be done at home, at the doctor’s office, in the car, or anywhere you and your child spend time together. When you leave the library, you will have ideas for how to use these practices today with your child. The five best ways to help your child get ready to read are: Talking Singing Reading Writing Playing
  • Points to make Getting ready to read involves many skills. Some children learn these skills earlier and more quickly than other children, just like children learn to walk and talk at different ages. When you use the five practices, you can help your children learn important reading skills, like letter names and sounds, in ways that are appropriate for their ages and interests. There are simple activities you can do each day to help children learn about letters. Don’t push your child. If he or she isn’t interested in an activity, stop. Do have fun with these activities every day so your child wants to do them again and again!
  • Points to make If English is not your first language, speak to your child in the language you know best. This allows you to explain things to your child more fluently. Your child will be able to translate what he or she knows later, rather than having to learn both the concept and the English word at the same time.
  • Points to make Talking is one of the best ways for children to learn new words. Labeling games are just right for young children and a wonderful way to learn words. Babies love playing, “Where is your nose? Where are your toes?” Older children love to label things, too. As you go through your day, label objects and events in your child’s world. For example, “Look, Nina is on the wavy slide. What do we have at home that’s wavy?” Label feelings as well as things. “How did you feel when you went down the slide?” [Presenter: Try the activity below or another favorite labeling activity. Say to parents and caregivers: Visiting the library is a good time to learn new words and have conversations. Let’s label some of the things we see in this room. Pick one thing and talk about it with your child. Presenter: Model this.]
  • Points to make Children’s language and vocabulary grow through day-to-day interactions and experiences. Talking with the important people in their lives is one of the best ways for children to learn new words. Talk about what you’re doing as you go through your day. Ask your child questions, listen to the answers, and then ask another question based on what your child said. Use new words and use different words to express the same idea. “Remember when we went to the park yesterday? We’re going to make the identical trip today. We’ll do all the same things and repeat all the fun we had.” [Presenter: Model this question-answer strategy with a parent at the program. Ask parents/caregivers to do the same with their child.]
  • Points to make One way children learn vocabulary is from listening to stories. They listen to understand what is being said, which helps them learn new words and their meaning. Stories aren’t found just in books. You can tell stories about your day, your memories from growing up, or something about your child’s life. You also can use wordless picture books and make up a story together with your child. One of the wonderful things about telling stories with a wordless book is that the story is never told in exactly the same way. With wordless books, you can develop imagination along with language and vocabulary skills. [Presenter: Demonstrate how to read a wordless picture book. After reading, talk about the ways it supports vocabulary development: Helps to build children’s listening and oral language skills. Allows children to use their words in constructing a story. Allows the parent or caregiver to introduce new words and their meanings. Encourages critical thinking and creativity. If you have English Language Learners in the audience, stress how wordless picture books can be used no matter what language is spoken. You can also watch the video clip to demonstrate how to read a wordless picture book.]
  • Points to make Speak to your child often during the day and try to use many different words to express your ideas. Children love to imitate, and they will try to imitate your speech. [Presenter: Ask parents to think of “10 chances to chat” during the day. This will make them aware of how to fit in conversation. Chances to chat include while you are getting dressed in the morning, eating breakfast, riding in the car, walking from the car to a store, playing together, doing chores, taking a bath, going to bed, and saying goodnight. Have a parent pick an event, like a birthday party. Ask them to talk to their child about the event. If a child does not yet talk or is an early talker, model how the parent can ask and answer questions to have a “conversation” with the child. Parent: “Do you remember what kind of cake we had at your birthday party?” Pause. “Yes, we had two kinds of cake, chocolate and lemon. Your favorite was chocolate.” You also can watch the video clip to demonstrate how to use everyday conversation to learn new words.]
  • [Presenter: Pass out the words to “Everything Has a Shape” from Hap Palmer’s Sally the Swinging Snake . Play the tune and sing along together. You can exchange this song for any favorite that has rich vocabulary in the lyrics. Pass out the words to whatever song you choose.] Points to make Singing introduces children to new vocabulary. As your child hears new words, make sure you explain what they mean. Use the new words later to help your children remember their meaning. [Presenter: You also can watch one or both of the video clips to demonstrate singing.]
  • Points to make Books are a wonderful way to spend time talking and learning new words. As you read a story, stop and consider interesting words—have a conversation about them. Let your child have the opportunity to ask questions and make comments. It is the interaction with you that makes reading so special and important. Children learn many more new words from books than they do from everyday conversation. Hearing these “rarer” or less common words is very important to developing a large vocabulary. Remember, knowing many words means a child will be better prepared to learn to read. As you talk and explain what a new word means, you help your child increase vocabulary and general background knowledge. This will help your child understand more when he or she begins to read.
  • [Presenter: Introduce parents to the delights of reading a predictable book by reading a favorite from the booklist, “Talking: Books That Invite Verbal Participation,” (included in the ECRR Manual) or your favorite predictable book.] Points to make Predictable books increase children’s vocabulary by using repetitive language patterns and phrases, which engage children in “reading” before they actually learn to read. Predictable books encourage reading together as children will repeat the easily learned patterns with you as you read. When you come to a predictable line, use your voice and hand motions to encourage your child to read along with you. Information (nonfiction) books also are a great way to learn new words, as well as new information. Information books often have more complex vocabulary than other books. This helps children become more word conscious and interested in learning even more words. [Presenter: Have parents choose an information book and look at it with their child. Encourage parents to find something in the book of particular interest to their child, talk about words that are new to their child, and then read about them.]
  • [Presenter: Choose one of the two activities below. To make a word jar, have baby food jars, lids, and slips of paper for children and parents. They can take their word jars home, and add more words. Alternatively, describe the activity, and suggest parents try it at home. Give each parent/child pair a sheet of paper on which you’ve glued a magazine photo. Have parents and children think of a caption for the photo. Parents can write the caption or help their child do this.] Points to make Writing words helps increase vocabulary. Here are a few ideas for learning new words through writing activities. Make a book of your child’s favorite words. Or make a word jar. Write new words on slips of paper and collect them in a jar. Ask your child if some of the words “belong together” and group them. For example, group the names of animals, people, places, feelings, etc. Write captions for pictures or drawings. Ask your child what he or she wants the caption to say. Talk about how the caption relates to the drawing.
  • Points to make Play and have fun with words. Read a book with lots of made-up words like How Do You Wokka-Wokka? by Elizabeth Bluemle. Many books by Dr. Seuss also are excellent for this purpose. Try making up more words to go with the story. Silly poems are fun and can teach new vocabulary. Kids love riddles and jokes, which often use a “play on words.” Laugh along as you talk about the answer to the riddle or joke. Having fun with words helps your child become more conscious of words and eager to learn more.
  • Points to make You are your child’s first teacher, and your home is where your child begins to learn. You can make your home a great place to learn and help your child get ready to read. It does not take money to create special spaces where you and your child can talk, sing, read, write, and play. Here are a few ideas. [Presenter: Distribute the handout, “Getting Ready to Read at Home.” Referring to the handout, ask the group to describe places at home where their children read, keep books, write, and play. Make this interactive and emphasize that parents and caregivers do not need expensive toys or games to develop their children’s early literacy skills.]
  • [Presenter: You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. Presenter: Use the following slides to reinforce the five practices of talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing by briefly highlighting how your library supports each one. Have different materials, program calendars, brochures about services, etc. available. Customize what you say, depending on your audience and collections. ] Points to make The library has many materials and ideas you can use to talk, sing, read, write, and play with your child. It does not matter if your child is four days old or four years old, we have books, music, programs, and services to help your child learn language and pre-reading skills. Here are just a few examples.
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, suggestions for books that parents and children can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, a list of the types of CDs, book/CD combinations, and other materials children and parents can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to places at the library where children can write. Alternatively, use a photo of the library or a list of library materials that support children as they learn to write. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to places at the library where children can play and learn. Alternatively, use a photo of the library or a list of library materials that relate to play. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to programs the library offers, show the cover of a brochure or calendar, or add a list of upcoming programs. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources. Have program brochures or calendars available.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to an early literacy program for parents and caregivers. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)] [Presenter: Mention the Parent Workshop that is just for parents and caregivers and helps them learn more about how to use the five early literacy practices to help their children get ready to read. If you have a Parent Workshop scheduled, give parents and caregivers the details and encourage them to attend.]
  • [Presenter: Customize this slide with the name of your library, a graphic of your library card, your URL, or other library information.]
  • [Presenter: Customize this slide with the name of your library, a graphic of your library card, your URL, or other library information.]

Transcript

  • 1. Fun with WORDSfor Parents and Children
  • 2. Why we are hereState-of-the-art ideasProven practicesFun things to do at home
  • 3. Reading is essential to school success. Start now to help your child be ready to learn toLearning to read read begins before children start school.
  • 4. Children who start kindergarten with good pre-reading skills have an advantage. They are ready to learn to read. Why is it important for children to get ready to readbefore they start school?
  • 5. You are your child’s first teacher. You know your child best. Children learn best by doing, and they love doing things with you.Why are parentsso important in helping their children get ready to read?
  • 6. Five simple practices help children get ready to read. Help your childget ready to read with simple activities every day.
  • 7. The five practices provide fun learning experiences for children of different ages and interests.Every child is unique.
  • 8. Use the language you knowbest to help your childget ready to read.
  • 9. Talking to learn new words. Children learnnew words by labelingobjects, events, and feelings.
  • 10. Talking to learn new words. Have conversations. Ask your child questions.Talk during daily routines.
  • 11. Talking and telling stories to learn new words. “Tell me about when I was little,Children learnwords when what I liked to do.”you:• Read anddiscuss wordlesspicture books.• Tell familystories.
  • 12. Many chances to talk. “Remember your last birthday party? Let’s talk about it. Who was there? What was your favorite food? What games did we play?” Children learn words through everydayinteractions with you.
  • 13. Singing to learn words.Let’s sing “Everything Has a Shape.” Think about the words that might be new to your child. “Everything has a shape, Pencils, pretzels and plates. Sneakers and skates and Superman’s cape, Rivers and lakes and tiny snow flakes,Everything has a shape, everything has a shape.”
  • 14. Reading to learn new words.Rule of three times: Read a book 3 times to learn new vocabulary. Repetition helps children remember what new words mean.
  • 15. Reading to learn new words.Read:• Predictable Books• Information Books
  • 16. Writing to learn new words. Writing is a great way to makechildren conscious of words and tohelp them increase their vocabulary.
  • 17. Playing to learn new words. Children love to “play with words” in poems, jokes, and riddles. “Why do you have to go to bed?Because the bed won’t come to you!”
  • 18. Make your home a learning zone! Every day objects and basic toys are educational—since they were invented.
  • 19. The best toys are often the oneswhere the kids do the thinking,talking, deciding, and making.
  • 20. The New Orleans Public Library helps children get ready to read.We haveweekly storyhours at mostbranches.Bring a friendto story hour.
  • 21. Talking and reading:Board Books are We have books for you to take homewonderful first and read together.books. They won’tlast forever, butthey are lots of fun.
  • 22. Singing:Learn new songs! We have music to borrow.We have rap, pop,children’s, Cajun, Dancing with your kid is funcountry, classical,folk, and world music and tires them out! for you to borrow.
  • 23. Writing The Library has free coloring sheets andThe Library has crayons. Wethe tiniest pencils encourage kidswith no erasers! to spend a littleBecause you can quiet time making We have a bookmarkmake mistakes at pictures during design contest everythe Library. their visits. year.
  • 24. PlayingWe offer some of the best free programs in the city during the Summer
  • 25. Many story hours include a craft project. You provide the child and we provide the paper and scissors. Our crafts are often based on books—and you can talk about the book as you color.Children’s parties atthe Library are freeand include a widerange of activities.
  • 26. Find free programs for all ages @ neworleanspubliclibrary.orgTeen Programs:Game Nights,Workshops,Movies.Adults:Artist talks,author visits,book clubs, andmore.
  • 27. Come to future Every Child Ready to Read classes for parents and children.• Funfor Parents and Children• Fun with Letters•Fun with Science and MathWe also offer PrimeTime Family Reading Time,a six-week literacy & discussion program forfamilies with children ages 6 to 12.
  • 28. How do I get a Library card??Bring a photo ID with your currentaddress to the Library to get a freelibrary card.
  • 29. The New OrleansPublic Library hasbeen dedicated topromoting readingsince 1896. ONLINE @ neworleanspubliclibrary.org Hours (vary by location) Monday through Thursday: 10 am to 7 pm Saturday 10 am to 5 pm Friday: 10 am to 5 pm Main Library, Central City Friday: 9 am to 5 pm King Branch
  • 30. Thanks for Coming.Keep Coming Back!