Fun with Math & Science for Families

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Math & Science activities for families presented in a workshop from Every Child Ready to Read--customized by New Orleans Public Library, based on ECRR 2011.

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  • [Instructions for presenters are in brackets and red type. Additional background information for this workshop is included in the Every Child Ready to Read ® (ECRR) 2 nd Edition Manual and CD. For this workshop, have an assortment of age-appropriate materials (ages two to five) nearby to use during the presentation: picture books and information books related to science and math, activity books parents can use to find science and math activities for their children, and other types of materials that parents can use to talk, sing, read, write, and play with their children. Also, select a math activity from a title in your library that parents and children can do together. Use this as an example of how the library supports early literacy and learning.] Information to present and points to make to the audience are in black type. Consider your community and audience as you present the workshop. The workshop is intended to be flexible, so that you can modify the presentation. For example, you can substitute books and activities that may have special meaning for parents and children you expect to attend. Feel free to present information in your own words. [Presenter: Welcome parents and caregivers and introduce the workshop.] Points to make We are happy you are here. We are going to have fun together while we talk about how to start getting your child ready to read. You will leave with ideas you can begin to use today.
  • Why have the parents come? Do any of them make their living in science? Did they like science in school? Have they been to other Every Child Ready to Read workshops?
  • KG: This is optional, but I think that a lot of parents believe that spending lots of money on educational toys and computers will solve the problem. When they prove that a roomful of gizmos works better than bedtime stories, I’ll take the slide out. Teach your baby to read was sold via a particularly nauseating infomercial claiming that tiny tots could learn to read at a third grade level or better with their DVD set. It didn’t make any sense that a child who could barely walk could read a book and understand it. Baby Einstein (from Disney) advertised that they would educate a child and they finally had to give the money back to parents because it was proven NOT to work. Hooked on Phonics doesn’t work very well, but doesn’t seem to have died out yet.
  • Points to make From the time they are infants, children learn language and other important skills that will help them learn to read. [Presenter: Ask audience members the ages of their children.] Whether your child is four days old or four years old, it is not too early or too late to help him or her develop important literacy and pre-reading skills. Developing early literacy skills now will make it easier for your child to learn to read when he or she starts school. You can help your child learn language and other early literacy skills with simple activities. These are easy to make part of your everyday routine and are fun for both you and your child.
  • Points to make You have been your child’s teacher from the day he or she was born. You know more about your child than anyone else. This includes the best ways and times for your child to learn. Let’s try something. [Presenter: Ask parents to introduce their child to someone sitting next to them. Have the children shake hands.] If your child is old enough, show him or her how to introduce himself or herself to another child or an adult and shake hands. Have your child model what you do. If your child isn’t speaking yet, make the introductions for him or her. If your child is shy, introduce him or her to the person next to you and ask if they want to shake hands. Parents are tremendous role models, and children learn a lot just from watching you. If your children see that you think reading is important and enjoy it, they will follow your lead. Children learn best by doing—and they love doing things with YOU.
  • Points to make Children’s reading success in kindergarten and beyond begins with positive language and literacy experiences from the time they are infants. If children develop pre-reading skills before they start kindergarten, they can focus on learning to read once they begin school. Children who start kindergarten ready to learn to read have greater success throughout their school years. They are more likely to read at or above grade level by the end of 2nd grade. Children who read at or above grade level by the end of 4th grade are much more likely to graduate from high school and be successful readers and learners throughout their lives.
  • Points to make You can help your children learn important skills they need to become good readers. The more your child knows about the world and the more words they have to describe what they have seen and experienced, the better prepared they are for reading success. We are going to talk about how to use children’s natural curiosity to learn new words and increase their knowledge about the world around them. Let’s explore some ways to do this with fun science and math activities.
  • Points to make Children are natural scientists and mathematicians. They have a tremendous curiosity about what goes on around them. They love to explore, ask questions, predict, sort, classify, compare, and contrast. You can find opportunities every day to involve children in science and math activities. You do not have to be an expert to do this. Just give your children the chance to ask questions, look for answers, and talk about the experience. Let’s try a science activity together to see how this works. [Presenter: Choose a science inquiry activity to try. The next slide has one suggestion, or you can pick another based on the interests of your group.]
  • Points to make The scientific method is the way scientists, and really all people, learn about the world around them. The scientific method can be used to study anything from a leaf, to an animal, to the entire universe. The basis of the scientific method is asking questions and then trying to come up with the answers. [Presenter: Demonstrate this experiment or substitute an experiment of your choosing.]
  • Points to make Children are full of questions about what goes on around them. Use their natural curiosity to help your children learn how to find answers for themselves. The experience of asking a question and looking for an answer helps children learn new information and vocabulary. It helps them become more independent, and it motivates them to want to learn more. The process of asking and answering questions also gives you and your child chances to talk together. Conversation and interaction with you provide many chances for your child to learn. The next time your child asks a question about how something works, you might say, “I’m not sure—let’s find it out.” In this way, you are helping your child use the scientific method and discover something for him or herself.
  • Points to make Children love to observe things up close. In the course of doing so, they are learning to use words to describe things of interest. They may even begin to record some of their observations through drawings and simple writing. [Presenter: Ask the group what they observe about the butterfly pictured in the slide. Have a book about butterflies that includes information on the monarch butterfly. Discuss the wings, antennae, etc. Have adult and child pairs choose an information book and: Look. Talk. Read. Draw and write.]
  • Points to make Read information (nonfiction) books with your children so they can learn more about what especially interests them. The library has many information books about science, math, interesting people, other countries, cooking, and much more. Before you leave today, let your child pick out a few information books to take home. Read them together and talk about new words and ideas. [Presenter: Demonstrate how to read an information book. Show parents and caregivers how to ask questions, make a guess or prediction, observe, and summarize what they have learned together from the reading.]
  • Points to make Like science, math has concepts that explain how our world works. Help your child learn math concepts such as more and less, large and small, long and short. Talk about ways to sort things, for example foods that are white, foods that come in bags, foods that you keep in the refrigerator. Notice shapes: find circles, squares, and triangles in everyday objects. Find repeating patterns. Patterns are found in all kinds of math. Look for patterns in clothing, on toys, in leaves and flowers, on cups and plates—everywhere. Math gives children a way to talk about objects and ideas, which develops vocabulary and general knowledge about the world. This is important as children learn to read. The more words and ideas they understand, the better children can comprehend what they read.
  • Points to make Children love to count, measure, sort, and compare. Use their natural interest in math to help them learn new words and concepts. Recognizing patterns, classifying, and solving problems are also important pre-reading skills.
  • [Presenter: Have parents and caregivers use adding machine tape to measure the height of their child(ren). Leave it to the parent and child to figure out how to measure. Have each pair write the child’s name and age on the tape. Tape the strips along the wall from shortest to longest. Ask the following. Who is the tallest person in the room? Are any people the same height? Is the oldest person the tallest? Is the youngest person the shortest? How does a child’s height compare to his or her parent or caregiver?]
  • Sorting activity: Pasta in bags to sort by shape, size and colors. Muffin tins to put sorted into. Hand out muffin tin and gallon baggie of mixed pastas to each family. Let’s look at seeds. Bring seed packets and show different seeds that come out. Possibly find some seeds from trees (acorns) or local plants to show. Cut up an apple and an orange (or other vegetables and fruit) to show seeds inside: tomatoes, green peppers, cherries, peaches or avacados. Garlic. Indian corn. Show pictures of seeds we eat: nuts, beans, sesame seeds, coriander seeds, poppy seeds, peas, rice. We drink stuff made from seeds: coffee is made from coffee beans. Seed packets: watermelon seeds, corn, flowers, peas, peppers, tomatoes, [Presenter: Engage parents and children in the math activity you selected from a title your library owns. Show the book, and other related titles, to parents. Encourage them to check out books at the end of the workshop.]
  • Points to make As children ask questions and search for answers, they learn new information that leads to more questions and answers. Science and math activities provide many chances for conversation and interaction, which lead to learning new words and information. Remember, the more words your child knows and the more knowledge he or she has, the easier it is to learn to read. You can learn along with your child. Check out books about science and math and read them together. Ask for help finding information you need.
  • Points to make You are your child’s first teacher, and your home is where your child begins to learn. You can make your home a great place to learn and help your child get ready to read. It does not take money to create special spaces where you and your child can talk, sing, read, write, and play. Here are a few ideas. [Presenter: Distribute the handout, “Getting Ready to Read at Home.” Referring to the handout, ask the group to describe places at home where their children read, keep books, write, and play. Make this interactive and emphasize that parents and caregivers do not need expensive toys or games to develop their children’s early literacy skills.]
  • [Presenter: You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. Presenter: Use the following slides to reinforce the five practices of talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing by briefly highlighting how your library supports each one. Have different materials, program calendars, brochures about services, etc. available. Customize what you say, depending on your audience and collections. ] Points to make The library has many materials and ideas you can use to talk, sing, read, write, and play with your child. It does not matter if your child is four days old or four years old, we have books, music, programs, and services to help your child learn language and pre-reading skills. Here are just a few examples.
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, suggestions for books that parents and children can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add any of the following to the right side of the slide: a photo of your library, a list of the types of CDs, book/CD combinations, and other materials children and parents can check out, or related information of your choice. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and collections. Show examples of materials to children, parents, and caregivers.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to places at the library where children can write. Alternatively, use a photo of the library or a list of library materials that support children as they learn to write. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to places at the library where children can play and learn. Alternatively, use a photo of the library or a list of library materials that relate to play. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to programs the library offers, show the cover of a brochure or calendar, or add a list of upcoming programs. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources. Have program brochures or calendars available.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to programs the library offers, show the cover of a brochure or calendar, or add a list of upcoming programs. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.) Customize what you say about this slide, depending on your audience and resources. Have program brochures or calendars available.]
  • [Presenter: This is an optional slide. You can customize this slide by adding the name of your library or your library’s logo to the purple sidebar on the left. You also can replace the generic “library” photo in the sidebar with a photo of your library. Add a photo to the right side of the slide that relates to an early literacy program for parents and caregivers. The ECRR Manual includes examples of slides that have been customized to indicate where to place logos, photos, and information. (See Section II pages 3 and 4.)] [Presenter: Mention the Parent Workshop that is just for parents and caregivers and helps them learn more about how to use the five early literacy practices to help their children get ready to read. If you have a Parent Workshop scheduled, give parents and caregivers the details and encourage them to attend.]
  • [Presenter: Customize this slide with the name of your library, a graphic of your library card, your URL, or other library information.]
  • [Presenter: Customize this slide with the name of your library, a graphic of your library card, your URL, or other library information.]
  • Fun with Math & Science for Families

    1. 1. Fun with Science andMathfor Parents andChildren
    2. 2. Whyare wehere?Because you love your kidBecause helping them be ready to read whenthey go to school is importantBecause math and science are ways to teach your child about the worldBecause math and science are important
    3. 3. Don’t get conned or Children become “ready to read”waste your hard- between 4 and 7 years old.earned money “Teach your Baby to Read”™ was No DVD, flashcards, talking toy, or sued by unhappy computer can do customers and quit selling educational what YOU can do DVDs. to get them ready to read. You’ve already started! Cost of it: free
    4. 4. Reading is essential to school success. Start now to help your child get ready to read. Learning to read begins beforechildren start school.
    5. 5. You are your child’s first teacher. You know your child best. Children learn best by doing, and they love doing things with you. Why are parents so important in helping their children getready to read?
    6. 6. Children who start kindergarten with good pre-reading skills have an advantage. Why is it They are ready to learn to read.important for children to get ready to read before they start school?
    7. 7. Help your child get ready to read by learning about science and math.The language of science andmath can expand your child’s vocabulary.
    8. 8. Learning about the world helps children get ready to read. Children can learn importantknowledge about how the world works through simple science and math experiences.
    9. 9. What is the scientific method?The scientific method is a way to ask andanswer questions by making observations anddoing experiments.What are the steps?1.Ask a question.2. Make a guess about the answer.3. Do an experiment.4. Make observations.5. Draw conclusions.
    10. 10. Let’s learn how to learn by exploring ice cubes! 1. Question: Does warm water affect ice? 2. Predict: Make a guess. Will the ice cubes in warm water melt differently than the ice cubes inAn example of the cold water?scientific method. 3. Experiment: Put some ice cubes in warm water and some ice cubes in cold water. 4. Observe: Watch the ice cubes closely. 5. Conclusion: What happens???
    11. 11. Start with questions.Help your childlearn how to learn. How do trees Why can I see my get a drink of breath when it is• Encourage your water? cold? child to ask questions.• Talk about possible answers. How much is one-• Look for answers half of something? together: talk,read, and write! What is your question?
    12. 12. Let’s learn about…butterflies.Let‘s learn.1. Look.2. Talk.3. Read.4. Draw and write.
    13. 13. Read information, or nonfiction, books.Read about topicsthat your children find especially interesting.
    14. 14. Learning about the world continues with math. Math helpschildren talk and learn about objects and ideas.
    15. 15. Math concepts are easy to include in everyday conversation. How many are there? Which one is the largest? Which one looks like a cone? Can you put them in order from smallest to largest?Help your child:• Count• Measure• Sort• Compare• Order
    16. 16. Play around with math.Use math to describe, compare, and drawconclusions.
    17. 17. More math adventures. Let’s havemore fun with math!
    18. 18. Learn together by: • Exploring new ideas. • Digging deeper. • Asking questions. • Experimenting. • Drawing conclusions!Explore the world with your children every day.
    19. 19. Make your home a learning zone!Your home iswhere you canhelp your child get ready to read.
    20. 20. The best toys are often the ones wherethe kids do the thinking, talking, deciding,and making.
    21. 21. Your library helps children get ready to read.We haveweekly storyhours at mostbranches.Bring a friend tostory hour.
    22. 22. Talking and reading: We have books for you to take home and read together.Board Books arewonderful for babiesand toddlers. Theywon’t last forever, butthey are lots of fun.
    23. 23. Singing: We have music to borrow.Learn new songsand the words to oldsongs! Dancing with your kid is fun and tires them out!We have rap, pop,children’s, Cajun,country, classical,folk, and worldmusic! Free toborrow.
    24. 24. Writing We have places where you can write. We offer coloring pagesThe Library has the and have crayons that yourtiniest pencils with child can use at the library.no erasers! Include “coloring time” inBecause you can your library visits.make mistakes atthe Library.
    25. 25. Playing:We have many exciting freeperformances, especially in the Summer.
    26. 26. Partying at the Library is Fun!It’s NOT alwaysscary!
    27. 27. Find free programs for all ages @ neworleanspubliclibrary.orgTeen Programs:Game Nights,Workshops,Movies.Adults:Artist talks,author visits,book clubs, andmore.
    28. 28. Find free programs for all ages @ the Library Irvin Mayfield and the NOJO at theWalter Isaacson signing Libraryhis book on Steve Jobs
    29. 29. Come to future Every Child Ready to Read classes for parents and children.• Funwith Stories• Fun with Letters• Fun with Words We also offer PrimeTime Family Reading Time, a program for families with children ages 6 to 12. It is a 6-week program of free workshops with meals, transportation, and rewards.
    30. 30. How do I get a Library card??Bring a photo ID with your currentaddress to the Library to get a freelibrary card.
    31. 31. The New OrleansPublic Library hasbeen dedicated topromoting readingsince 1896. ONLINE @ neworleanspubliclibrary.org Hours (vary by location) Monday through Thursday: 10 am to 7 pm Saturday 10 am to 5 pm Friday: 10 am to 5 pm Main Library, Central City Friday: 9 am to 5 pm King Branch
    32. 32. Thanks for Coming.Keep Coming Back!

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