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West Village // Ina Kovacevic
 

West Village // Ina Kovacevic

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Created as a design proposal that featured urban-surfaces and street-furniture derived from vernacular color studies of the West Village District of NYC. Done in Kevin Byrne’s Visual Thinking course ...

Created as a design proposal that featured urban-surfaces and street-furniture derived from vernacular color studies of the West Village District of NYC. Done in Kevin Byrne’s Visual Thinking course at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, 2008-2010

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    West Village // Ina Kovacevic West Village // Ina Kovacevic Document Transcript

    • WESTVILLAGE NEW YORK CITY INES KOVACEVIC
    • 4TH + PERRY ST.
    • PERRY ST.
    • PERRY ST.
    • 9TH AVE. + 13TH ST.
    • 4TH + BLEECKER
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • BLEECKER ST.
    • BLEECKER ST.
    • BLEECKER +MACDOUGAL ST.
    • PERRY ST.
    • BLEECKER ST.
    • BLEECKER ST.
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • GREENWICH VILLAGE
    • BLEECKER ST.
    • GROVE + BLEECKER
    • 416 BLEECKER ST.
    • 314 BLEECKER ST.
    • BLEECKER + ACADEMY
    • BLEECKER + HILL
    • MAIN + HILL
    • GREENWICH AVE. + 7TH AVE.
    • CONCLUSIONExploring through my stock of photographs taken a few years back from a three-month stay in New York brought back an array of exquisite, endearing, and deca-dent memories from one of New York’s most underground yet highly culturalneighborhoods.Although much of the fabled Beatnik-era ambiance is gone, youll find coffee-houses like Caffe Reggio and Cafe Figaro, which inspired writers such as JackKerouac and William Burroughs. These coffeehouses are one of West Village’sstaples in establishing its delightful and intriguing color palette.A primarily residential area, every few blocks or so you will find a basement coffee-house rivaled with a luxurious boutique, door-to-door. This blend of rich and purewarm-heartedness matched with a savory luxury defines the multitude of wonderwithin a sacred West Village.Never having paid so much attention to the color palette before this assignmenthas taught me to look to the detail to get the big picture. The extraordinary bright-ness on the Gorgeous and Dynamic side of Kobayashi’s Word Image Chartmatched with the muted Elegance and Chic Dandyism essentially define WestVillage at the core. The classic history behind such a marvelous neighborhood haskept itself timeless virtually because of its perfect blend of cool and warm colors,each keeping the other in check while maintaining an aura of calm.The Colorist design application that I chose to use in furthering this assignment wasthe signage and billboard chart. Looking at the range of billboards, restaurant andshop signs are even greater details in describing West Village as a marvelouswhole. Through the placement of the specific sign-focused photographs onKobayashi’s Word Image Chart, we can see that the same tonality is kept within thesignage as it is with the general color scheme. The lower left hand corner stilloccupies the majority of the visual cues that define West Village as a whole. Theexcessive marking of Gorgeous, Dynamic, Dandy, Classic, Formal, Modern, CoolCasual, and Clear add a range, but a specific range nonetheless as to the culturethat defines itself through these visual cues.The tradition is kept alive through modern décor within a historic paradise, deliver-ing a profusion of excitement, culture, ambience, and decadent luxury all withinManhattan’s tucked-away gem.I have learned more than anything to take in my surroundings on a much morekeen basis, wherever I am. I have already put this exercise into a real life settingwithout even realizing it and it has helped me open the door to what each particu-lar neighborhood, anywhere in the world, has to offer. I am becoming more fullyawake to the color cues my environment has to offer while steering away from mynatural urge to become oblivious. Far too often, I will get too focused on specificdetails without relating that noted detail to the whole of a grand masterpiece.Observing what is a cultural landmark and what is culturally fleeting can speakwonders about a space’s identity and I have learned to not only observe andperceive, but to translate my observations and perceptions into what kind ofdwellers reside in a timeless and cultural neighborhood.