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Visual Thinking Course at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design

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Spring Semester 2010, J. Kevin Byrne, Instructor

Spring Semester 2010, J. Kevin Byrne, Instructor

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  • 1. B R A AP Z ABR A ALA NI E P RE E K VN B R E R NG X E INC : E I Y NE VS A T I I 241 IU L HNKNG ..0
  • 2. A growing number of chemists are now developing biodegradable plastics in replace of those that are made by oil. Right now, bio plastics are being made from corn and other plants, more recently than others, additions of cotton. Besides reducing greenhouse gas emissions during production, biodegradable plastics leave no waste, and can “maximize economic development by using local crops”, according to Susan Moran of The New York Times. In the past few years, plastic forks and other disposable utensils have been made out of bio plastic, but companies are beginning to use bio plastic in non disposable products like cell phones, including the Japanese companies NEC Corporation, Unitika and NTT DoCoMo. As of right now, the largest producer of bio plastic is NatureWorks, based in Nebraska. It uses corn sugar to make “polylactide”. Polylactide comes in the a The white pellet form, which NatureWorks sends to other companies, who then mold the bio plastic into Advancement products or packaging. Metabolix, based in Massachusetts, is another of company that produces a bio plastic. Metabolix specializes in films, specifically used in creating Bio Plastics garbage and shopping bags. According to Metabolix, their bio plastic composts in fewer than 90 days, in a wide variety of temperatures and places, including a nicholas kriegler consumer’s back yard, or “even the ocean itself”. By creating a bio plastic that is compostable under a larger variety of circumstances, littered bio plastic, specifically the type that Metabolix produces, has a higher chance of composting even when un-intended by a consumer. Metabolix, like NatureWorks, produces bio plastic, and then sells it in a standard form which is then molded by the purchasing company. According to the Metabolix website, their product is “Biobased, Sustainable, and Biodegradable”, meaning the “mirel”, a specific form of bio plastic is formed from all natural materials, leaves no carbon footprint, and decomposes within a relatively short amount of time. While bio plastics are still relatively new, chemists are coming up with more efficient forms. One of the main problems with bio plastics is that when used to package food products, the food product’s shelf life becomes much shorter. Chemists are trying to find a balance between bio plastics that decompose under a large variety of situations (intended or unintended) and last long enough to keep food fresh when packaged, one of the leading uses of regular plastics. Though not perfect, new forms of bio plastic are emerging from a large amount of chemists, hopefully meaning that we will soon have a more perfected form of bio plastic, eliminating waste and carbon emissions.
  • 3. All
  • 4. Full-Hue
  • 5. 80 °N 70 ARCTIC OCEAN °N 60° N 50 °N 40° N NORTH PACIFIC OCEAN NORTH ATLANTIC 30°N OCEAN Gulf of Mexico 20°N Caribbean Sea 10°N 0° Equator 10°S SOUTH PACIFIC 20°S OCEAN 30°S N LEGEND National boundary W E SOUTH km 0 500 1000 ATLANTIC S OCEAN mi 0 500 1000 S 40° 50°S 170°W 160°W 150°W 140°W 130°W 120°W 110°W 100°W 90°W 80°W 70°W 60°W 50°W 40°W 30°W 20°W 10°W 60°S
  • 6. this is visual counterpoint!
  • 7. natural movement was started in the center where most of the focus was but then followed the principle of glance curve with we had learned about early in the semester. I now closed my eyes for a few seconds to give my eyes a rest and a fresh view of the image. When opening them they zeroed in on the face and it drew all my attention in and even if I wanted to moved to look at over parts of the photograph my eyes didn’t want me to. All I wanted to see was the dragon like face. Once I had noticed that it seemed to have features of a dragon the entire piece came together. I closed my eyes for a final time and when I opened them all I could see was the eye of the dragon-esque image. I feel that by using the method I have learned to view images and artworks in a different manor. When I completed this task I felt like I had a stronger connection with the image then if I would have just walked by and peered at the photography any other time. In this process I seemed to start with the very simplicity objects and moved to the most detailed. I think that I’ll be able to use this method when doing drawings, it helped my understand of the composition increase and the many levels the build up to detail. This is a very valuable experience that I’ll be able to use in the future when I am studying images and making my own work.
  • 8. Multiple Intelligence Theory VThink09 Week 2 criteria
  • 9. Visual inking Trash receptacle installment proposal for Cesar Chavez Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. Based o a visual analysis of environmental urban color. Mike Borell
  • 10. Word Image Scale -Light & Pale -Pure & Genuine -Neat -Bracing -Enjoyable -Vivid -Natural -Friendly -Chic -Fashionable -Urbane -Cultivated Key Words
  • 11. New Receptacles Color palette extracted from environment
  • 12. Application 2
  • 13. Conclusion By thoroughly examining the Cesar Chavez niehgborhood surrounding El Burrito Mer- cado and applying Shigenobu Kobayashi’s color theory I was able to take on a whole new understanding of the areas atmosphere. e multiple businesses all tend to draw on certain color schemes that create similar feelings. Pure, genuine, vivid, natural, friendly, chic, urbane, cultivated. A er extracting and organizing the colors found within the neighborhood I was able to come up with these words by applying Kobayashi’s word image theory. In order to further accentuate these feelings I wanted to further integrate the colors that create these feelings within the environment. By replacing the existing trash receptacles (that contained only one color) with new receptacles, designed with a color palette that encompasses all of these feelings, I feel I have accomplished my goal. rough the application of Kobayashi’s theory and using his techniques I was able to further examine and understand the atmosphere created by the colors in the Cesar Chavez neighborhood. I now nd myself applying Kobayashi’s theory and technique to many di erent neighborhoods, especially my own. is is a valuable tool that I will be able to use for all kinds of environments in the future. ank you.