Kingsley Cv Illustrated
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Kingsley Cv Illustrated

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a detailed review of my career

a detailed review of my career

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Kingsley Cv Illustrated Kingsley Cv Illustrated Document Transcript

  • KENNETH J. KINGSLEY 7739 East Broadway No. 119 Tucson, AZ 85710 (520) 870-8766 ken.kingsley7@gmail.com Objective: short-term, seasonal opportunities in field biology, natural history interpretation, or natural history collections curation, paid or volunteer Education I am a conservation biologist with over 40 years of Ph.D., Entomology and Ecology, experience in ecological research and management, University of Arizona, Tucson retired after 14 years as a senior scientist with SWCA M.S., Biological Sciences, Environmental Consultants (swca.com). My work has University of Nevada, Las Vegas included invertebrate, mammal, bird, amphibian, reptile, and plant surveys of many areas in the B.A., Biology, Prescott College Southwestern U.S. and Hawaii. I have worked in a Expertise variety of natural and human-influenced habitats Ecology of birds, mammals, and including wilderness, subterranean, montane, wetland, invertebrates desert, riparian, aquatic, agricultural, and urban Field studies and surveys for rare environments. My background combines field skills, and endangered species experience exploring challenging environments, Conservation biology and habitat natural history interpretation, technical writing skills, conservation planning and critical analysis abilities. Integrated Pest Management I have conducted field surveys for wildlife and plants Riparian and aquatic ecosystems in Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico, Selected Experience Utah, and Texas. I have published papers in the peer- reviewed scientific literature on insects, mammals, Spring Mountains National endangered birds, and integrated pest management, Recreation Area and presented papers at many professional meetings. I o Butterfly Habitat Assessment have also published articles and photographs in other o Backcountry Ranger magazines and wrote a weekly natural history column Sonoita Creek State Natural for a newspaper for four years. I designed and Area, Arizona State Parks managed a private 4,500-acre wildlife preserve and a o Visitor Center Operation natural history museum for a guest ranch in Arizona. I o Pontoon Boat Tours have mentored other scientists, taught high school, o Bird Walks college, and graduate students, and provided o Trail Ambassador interpretive programs in a variety of settings. I have o Wildlife and plant surveys served as an adjunct professor for The Audubon Saguaro National Park Expedition Institute and Prescott College, and continue o Nature by Night Walks to engage in a variety of volunteer projects involving o Wildflower Walks natural history interpretation, wildlife surveys, and o Special Events ecological studies. Avian Inventory of the Lower I am an avid hiker, backpacker, canoeist, kayaker, and Santa Cruz River, Arizona mountain biker. I have had continuing education Organ Pipe Cactus National training as a Certified Interpretive Host, Wilderness Monument First Responder, Pet First Aid, Animal Rescue in o Ecology of Invertebrates Disasters, the U.S. Coast Guard Boating Skills and Death Valley National Park Safety course. I have acted as a supernumerary with o Mammals of the Grapevine the Arizona Opera Company and an actor with the Mountains Saint Francis Players.
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 2 EDUCATION Ph.D. 1985 Major: Entomology. Minor: Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. University of Arizona, Tucson. Dissertation: Bionomics and Management of Pest Mosquitoes at the Agro-urban Interface, Santa Cruz Valley, Arizona. M.S. 1981 Biology. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Thesis: Mammals of the Grapevine Mountains, Death Valley National Monument. B.A. 1972 Biology. Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona. Thesis: Natural History of the Prescott College Campus. CONTINUING EDUCATION Rapid Assessment of the Functional Condition of Stream-Riparian Ecosystems in the American Southwest, June 2008. Wilderness First Responder. Wilderness Medical Associates. Nov. 2007. Backcountry Ranger Volunteer Training, Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, July 18, 2007. Certified Interpretive Host Training. Arizona State Parks. December 7-8, 2006. CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated Electronic Defibrillator (AED). Arizona State Parks. November30, 2006. Rare Plant Monitoring Workshop, Flagstaff Arboretum, April 17, 2006. Wilderness First Aid, Basic. American Red Cross. June 2005. Yellow-billed Cuckoo Survey Training. Southern Sierra Research Station and Northern Arizona University. June 2-3, 2005. Chiricahua Leopard Frog Survey Training. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Arizona Game and Fish Department. April 17-18, 2004. Aquatic Bioassessment Survey Techniques. Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. April 11, 2004. Boating Skills and Seamanship. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. January-March 2004. Restoring Streams, Riparian Areas, and Floodplains: Tailoring Restoration to Community Needs and Scientific Contexts, Inventory and Monitoring. 2nd Southwest Training Workshop and Symposium. The Association of State Wetland Managers, Inc. Socorro, New Mexico. November 16-19, 2003. Boating Safety. Arizona Game and Fish Department, August 23, 2003. Animal Rescue in Disasters. Noah’s Wish Foundation. April 24-25 2003. The Endangered Species Act and Habitat Conservation Planning, Continuing Legal Education (CLE) International Seminar; Tucson, Arizona, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1997, 1994. 2
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 3 Yellowstone’s Charismatic Microbiota. The Yellowstone Association Institute, Yellowstone National Park. Two-day workshop on extremophile microbiology. Dr. David Ward, University of Montana. July 7-8, 2002. Flood Control and Urban Stream Channel Restoration-- A Practical Classroom Course. Presented by Dr. Ann Riley, Waterways Restoration Institute. Sponsored by Pima County Transportation and Flood Control District. Tucson, Arizona. November 1, 2001. Bat and Bat Cave Management Workshop. Bat Conservation International in association with the 15th National Cave and Karst Management Symposium. Tucson, Arizona. October 19, 2001. Reducing the Exotic Aquatics Species Threat in Pima County. Symposium sponsored by Pima Association of Governments. February 27th, 2001. Keynote speaker. Biological Assessment Workshop with Tools for Expediting Section 7 Consultations. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and The Wildlife Society. Sacramento, California. February 21, 2001. Creating a Multi-species Conservation Plan. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service National Conservation Training Center. Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan Education Session #7. November 6, 1999. Tucson. Conservation Biology. Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan Education Session #6. September 18, 1999. Techniques for the Effective Use of ANABAT in Identifying Free-flying Bat Species, Portal, Arizona, 24-28 May 1999. Bat Conservation International. Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl Survey Training. Arizona Game and Fish Department, Tucson, Arizona. November 20, 1998. Arizona Partners in Flight Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Training. May 1996. U.S. Forest Service Training for Inventory and Monitoring of Mexican Spotted Owl, Flagstaff, Arizona. May 17-18, 1991. Graduate course work in administration, management, policy, and counseling (51 credits). Arizona State University School of Social Work. 1987-1989. Vertebrate Pest Management Seminar. Cooperative Extension Service, University of Arizona. 1986. TEACHING AND INTERPRETIVE EXPERIENCE ZION NATIONAL PARK. April-October 2009. Approximately 16 hours per week. I served as a volunteer front country interpretive ranger. I staffed the Visitor Center, roved the trails, and collaborated with the Interpretive Supervisor in preparing a digital database of photographs to be used by the Interpretive Rangers for their programs. I reviewed some 4,000 photos and annotated each in the Microsoft Access database. I also assisted in various ways at special occasions during the Park’s Centennial Celebration events. 3
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 4 SONOITA CREEK STATE NATURAL AREA/PATAGONIA LAKE STATE PARK. Approximately 20 hours per week for four months. I conducted interpretive programs, primarily pontoon boat tours and bird walks, and staffed the visitor center. SWCA, INC. ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANTS. As Senior Scientist, responsible for mentoring junior scientists, providing information and support on a wide variety of issues and species of concern, reviewing manuscripts, and conducting specific training experiences. SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK. Volunteer leader of monthly nocturnal nature hikes. SHACKLETON SCHOOL. Guest educator, leading students from a private alternative high school in Massachusetts on backpacking trips in the Superstition and Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. CLE INTERNATIONAL. Invited lecturer in Continuing Legal Education conferences on the Endangered Species Act. 2000, 1999, 1997, 1994. Presented lectures for audiences of lawyers, agency personnel, consultants and the regulated community on aspects of the Endangered Species Act. AUDUBON EXPEDITION INSTITUTE. Adjunct Faculty. For three years, taught field courses in Systematic Investigation of Local Flora and Fauna for graduate students in environmental education. PRESCOTT COLLEGE. Adjunct Faculty. Mentored individual students studying biological science subjects, photography and illustration, and computer skills. Taught field courses on ecology and natural history. UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, LAS VEGAS. Graduate Teaching Assistant. Taught laboratory sessions in Human Anatomy and Physiology, introductory biology, vertebrate zoology, and ecology classes for majors and non-majors. THE WICKENBURG INN. Naturalist. Full-time resident naturalist at guest ranch in Arizona. Created program of natural history interpretation for guests, including a museum, nature walks, slide shows, and tours of historical sites and National Parks. Developed programs for children and adults, and international clientele. Wrote weekly natural history column for local newspaper. Led horseback, vehicular, and pedestrian tours. PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2009 Museum Technician, Zion National Park Volunteer Interpretive Ranger, Zion National Park Volunteer Resource Inventory and Monitoring Scientist, Arizona State Parks 2008 Volunteer Museum Curatorial Assistant and Interpretive Program Collaborator, Zion National Park, Springdale, Utah. 2007 Volunteer Natural Resources Scientist and Backcountry Ranger, Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Nevada. U.S. Forest Service. 2005-2007 Volunteer Resource Inventory and Monitoring Scientist and Interpretive Guide, Arizona State Parks. 1991 - 2005 Senior Scientist. SWCA, Inc., Environmental Consultants, Tucson. 1991 - 1994 Adjunct Faculty. Audubon Expedition Institute/Lesley College. 1990 - 1991 Project Manager/Zoologist. Southwestern Field Biologists, Tucson, Arizona. 1986 - 1990 Consulting Biologist. Owner of Biological Consulting Firm. 1987 - 1988 Adult Degree Program Advisor. Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona. 4
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 5 1985 - 1986 Post-Doctoral Research Associate. Dept. of Entomology, University of Arizona. 1982 - 1985 Graduate Research Associate. Department of Entomology, University of Arizona. 1981 - 1982 Biological Technician. National Park Service Coop. Unit, University of Arizona. 1978 - 1981 Biological Technician. National Park Service Coop. Unit, University of Nevada. 1974 - 1978 Adjunct Professor. Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona. 1972 - 1978 Naturalist and Wildlife Preserve Director. Wickenburg Inn, Wickenburg, Arizona. 1970 - 1972 Teaching and Research Assistant. Prescott College, Arizona. PERMITS AND CERTIFICATIONS Current: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service permit for surveys for threatened and endangered species in the Southwestern Region. Wilderness Medical Associates certified Wilderness First Responder. Inactive or expired: Arizona Game and Fish Department permit to conduct surveys for nongame birds, capture bats, handle desert tortoises and other reptiles and amphibians, and capture fish. Utah River Guide III; US Forest Service certified for surveys and monitoring of Mexican spotted owl; Arizona Department of Agriculture and Horticulture agricultural pest control advisor (insects); Arizona Department of Public Safety Emergency Medical Technician. AWARDS AND HONORS Volunteer of the Year Award. 2007. Get Outdoors Nevada (Interagency Volunteer Program). 1,000-Hour Volunteer Service Award. Arizona State Parks. 2007. 2001 Professional Design Award. Analysis and Planning Category. Arizona Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Team award, to The Acacia Group and members of the analysis and planning team for the Irvington Road Landfill End-Use Masterplan. Forgotten Pollinators Award. Awarded for outstanding contribution to pollinator science and conservation, by the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Sonoran Arthropod Studies Institute, and Xerces Society. 1997. 2,000-Hour Volunteer Service Award. U.S. National Park Service. 1989. Gamma Sigma Delta. Honor Society of Agricultural Scientists, elected member. 1985. American Ornithologists Union. Honorary undergraduate student membership award. 1972 MEMBERSHIPS AND AFFILIATIONS Arizona Native Plant Society Nevada Native Plant Society Utah Native Plant Society Society for Conservation Biology Desert Fishes Council Pima Invasive Species Council The Wildlife Society 5
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 6 HONORARY APPOINTMENTS, COMMITTEES, AND PANELS Natural Areas Program Advisory Committee, Arizona State Parks Gila Box Riparian National Conservation Area Advisory Committee, U.S. Bureau of Land Management Adaptive Management Science Team, Clark County Multiple Species Conservation Plan Water Resources Research Center, University of Arizona, Technical Advisory Committee Center For Insect Science, University of Arizona, Professional Affiliate Tucson Regional Water Council (Advisory Committee) PUBLICATIONS AND REPORTS In the following sections, reports and publications for which I have electronic reprints available are indicated in blue type. I will be happy to email selected copies on request. 6
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 7 References Mr. Tom Furgason, Director, Arizona Natural Resources Program SWCA Environmental Consultants 343 West Franklin Street Tucson, Arizona 85701 (520) 325-9194 tfurgason@swca.com Mr. Furgason was my immediate supervisor when I retired from SWCA. He began his career with SWCA as one of my protégés, and worked with me on many projects. Ms. Julia Fonseca, Environmental Planning Manager Pima County Regional Flood Control District 97 E. Congress, 2nd floor Tucson, AZ 85701-1797 (520) 243-1800 Julia.Fonseca@rfcd.pima.gov Ms. Fonseca was the Pima County project manager on the Pima County Habitat Conservation Plan, and has also worked with me on several other projects. Heidi Blasius U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Safford Office, 711 14TH Ave. Safford, Arizona 85546 Heidi_Blasius@blm.gov (520) 221-0354 Ms. Blasius was the client’s project manager for a project I conducted for the BLM, and has participated with me on several projects I worked on as a volunteer. Mr. Douglas Duncan, Fisheries Biologist U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Ecological Services 201 North Bonita, Suite 141 Tucson, Arizona 85745 520-670-6144 x236. Doug_Duncan@fws.gov Mr. Duncan served on the Scientific and Technical Advisory Team of the Pima County Habitat Conservation Plan, and also participated with me on the Pima County Invasive Species Council and fish surveys. Mr. Steven Haas, Manager Catalina State Park 11570 N. Oracle Rd Tucson, AZ 85737 (520) 628-5798 shaas@azstateparks.gov Mr. Haas is the manager of a State Park area at which I served as a volunteer both conducting natural resources surveys and providing interpretive services. 7
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 8 Joanne Roberts, Natural Resources Ecologist PO BOX 817 Hereford, Arizona 85615 520-378-4859 jmroberts@powerc.net Ms. Roberts was the Natural Resources Ecologist for Arizona State Parks and was the supervisor for my volunteer work conducting natural resources surveys in parks Leslie Liberti, Director Office of Conservation and Sustainable Development City of Tucson P.O. Box 27210 Tucson, Arizona 85726-7210 (520) 791-4675 Leslie.Liberti@tucsonaz.gov Ms. Liberti was an associate and project manager at SWCA Environmental Consultants with whom I collaborated on several projects. Sue Wainscott, Adaptive Management Coordinator Clark County, Nevada Desert Conservation Program Department of Air Quality and Environmental Management 500 South Grand Central Parkway PO Box 558270 Las Vegas, Nevada 89155-8270 (702) 455-3859 swainsco@co.clark.nv.us Ms. Wainscott was the coordinator of the Adaptive Management Team for the Clark County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan. I served on her team and collaborated with her on several reports. Amy Nichols, Natural Resource Officer and Volunteer Coordinator Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive Las Vegas, NV 89130 (702) 515-5421 anichols@fs.fed.us Ms. Nichols was my supervisor for work I conducted as a volunteer Natural Resource Scientist and Backcountry Ranger. Leslie Courtright, Museum Curator Zion National Park State Route 9 Springdale, UT 84767 435-772-0166 leslie_courtright@nps.gov Ms. Courtright is the curator of the museum of Zion National Park. I worked as a volunteer under her direction in the process of moving the museum collections to a new location. 8
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 9 Marc Neidig, Supervisory Park Ranger, Division of Interpretation Zion National Park State Route 9 Springdale, UT 84767 435-772-0164 marc_neidig@nps.gov Mr. Neidig was the supervisor of the Division of Interpretation of Zion National Park during the time I served as a volunteer. 9
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 10 SELECTED PROJECTS ENTOMOLOGICAL ADVENTURES Ph.D. Entomology and Ecology, University of Arizona, Tucson My career in entomology was been multifaceted. I was trained in a Ph.D. program that emphasized Integrated Pest Management (IPM), and my dissertation was an IPM-based study of mosquitoes. But while trained in how to kill bugs, I never lost my appreciation for the diversity and beauty of the insect world. The range of projects I have pursued during my career has included IPM for mosquitoes and pecan aphids, entomological inventories of diverse habitats, and conservation biology of endangered invertebrates. Below are some examples of the types of work I have done. Invertebrate Surveys and Studies This work falls into several categories: Interpretive Materials Common, Conspicuous, and Curious Arthropods of Zion National Park. 2008. As a volunteer, I reviewed the catalog of specimens and existing literature, conducted field surveys, compiled photographs from the field and internet, and wrote a book and intranet resource on the insects and other arthropods of the park for the interpretive staff. 10
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 11 Aquatic Surveys In search of the Zion Net-winged Midge. As a volunteer in Zion National Park. An endemic midge fly, Blepharicera zionensis is known only from The Narrows of the Virgin River in Zion National Park. The immature stages are aquatic, and the adults are riparian. Amanda Jacobson, a researcher at the University of Tennessee, is working on an analysis of this small, obscure family of Diptera for her dissertation. She needed specimens of this fly for DNA and morphological analysis, but did not have a budget to support a collecting trip. I assisted her with the process of obtaining a collecting permit, and then made several trips to find the flies and collect some for her. This required wading several miles in the river, watching for flies, and surreptitiously collecting specimens. I wrote an article about the species and my observations for Nature Notes, a publication of Zion National Park. Springsnail Status Monitoring. As a volunteer for Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, U.S. Forest Service. 2007. Springsnails of the genus Pyrgulopsis include many highly endemic species, often limited in distribution to only one or a handful of springs. They are minute, cryptic, often difficult to access, and poorly known. Two species of springsnails (P. deaconi and P. turbatrix) have been documented as occurring at several springs that are under management jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service in the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area. The Forest Service was committed to periodic monitoring of these populations at five springs, but had not been able to do so since 1998 because of a lack of trained personnel. I visited each of the springs and documented the presence of snails and current conditions in a detailed report that will serve as a basis for further periodic monitoring. Bioassessment of Aquatic Macroinvertebrates. For ASARCO, Inc. 1998-2006. I developed a protocol and conducted annual surveys and analysis of aquatic macroinvertebrates in Mineral Creek, above and below a mining operation to assist ASARCO, Inc. in compliance with its NPDES permit. I collected samples of invertebrates using a timed kick net method, and analyzed the results statistically using standard EPA analysis methods. I prepared annual reports on this work. I documented appreciable improvements in the macroinvertebrate community as a result of the pollution control effort. I was invited as an expert participant in the EPA sponsored workshop: Arid Southwestern Streams Biological Condition Gradient and Tiered Aquatic Life Uses held in Tempe, Arizona, February 7-10, 2005. Aquatic Fauna of Minor Tributaries of the Colorado River. For U.S. National Park Service, Grand Canyon National Park. 1982-1986. I conducted an investigation of ecology of invertebrates and vertebrates in rock pools and small streams along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. This study required participating in multi-disciplinary research river trips for 21 days each year, and investigating biota of aquatic ecosystems of side canyons that included springs, interrupted streams, and rock basins. The study was conducted over a range of rainfall years, from extreme drought to severe flooding, and contrasted the effects on fauna of the different aquatic systems and rainfall amounts. I prepared a report which was submitted to the National Park Service, and presented a talk at a professional society meeting. Aquatic Fauna of Minor Tributaries of the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon. Southwestern Association of Naturalists, Glendale, AZ. 1985. 11
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 12 Arthropod Fauna of Quitobaquito Springs Management Area. For U.S. National Park Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. 1983-1984. I led a team that conducted a two- year survey of arthropod fauna of a desert oasis using a variety of techniques for terrestrial and aquatic species. Published Technical Report: K.J. Kingsley, R.A. Bailowitz and R.L. Smith. 1987. A Preliminary Investigation of the Arthropod Fauna of Quitobaquito Springs Area, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. National Park Service/University of Arizona Tech. Rep. No. 23 CPSU Contrib. 057/01. Tucson, Arizona 26 pp. Ecology of Temporary Waters in the Sonoran Desert. As an informal study while I worked for The Wickenburg Inn, I had the opportunity to observe a temporary pond from the day it filled with water until the hour it dried. I took samples of the biota almost every day, and presented the data in several forms: A talk at a professional society meeting: Ecology of a Temporary Desert Pond. Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science. Tempe, AZ. 1979. An article in a popular magazine: K.J. Kingsley and M.A. Kurzius. 1978. After desert storm hidden life erupts. Defenders of Wildlife Magazine 53: 318-324. And a paper in a peer-reviewed scientific journal: K.J. Kingsley. 1985. Eretes sticticus (L) (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae): Life History Observations and an Account of a Remarkable Event of Synchronous Emigration from a Temporary Desert Pond. Coleopterists Bulletin 39: 7-10. Surveys and Conservation Biology of Terrestrial Invertebrates Spring Mountains Acastus Survey. For Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, U.S. Forest Service. I conducted a monitoring survey for a rare butterfly (Spring Mountains Acastus Checkerspot (Chlosyne acastus robusta)) in an area planned for fuels reduction management under the Wildlands-Urban Interface program of the Forest. In the report, I reviewed all existing information about this butterfly and relevant literature. The report will serve as a baseline reference for surveys to be conducted after the fuels reduction project. Contact: Amy Nichols, Natural Resource Officer and Volunteer Coordinator, Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89130. (702) 515-5421. anichols@fs.fed.us Butterfly Habitat Assessment. As a volunteer for Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, U.S. Forest Service. 2007. The Spring Mountains National Recreation Area is located in southern Nevada, close to the rapidly developing city of Las Vegas. Eight taxa of butterflies are endemic to the Spring Mountains, and are subjects of a conservation agreement between the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Four species have been identified as priorities for conservation: The Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly (Icaricia shasta charlestonensis), Morand’s checkerspot (Euphydryas anicia morandi), Spring Mountains Acastus Checkerspot (Chlosyne acastus robusta), and Spring Mountains Dark Blue Butterfly (Euphilotes enoptes purpura). I conducted habitat assessments for portions of a planned new 12
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 13 multi-use trail, identifying, mapping, and counting known food plants of the butterflies. The purpose of this study was to mitigate potential impacts to butterfly habitat. This assessment was conducted during a severe drought year, and few of the butterfly host plants, and none of the butterflies were found. One species of known host plant (Astragalus calycosus, a host of the Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly) was determined to be very widespread in its distribution, and thriving in sites that had been disturbed by human and wild burro activity, but that were outside the known distribution range of the butterfly. I submitted a written report (Butterfly Habitat Assessment for the Blue Tree Trail, Catch Pen And Rocky Gorge Segments Realignments) and PowerPoint presentation. Contact: Amy Nichols, Natural Resource Officer and Volunteer Coordinator, Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89130. (702) 515-5421. anichols@fs.fed.us Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly Surveys. As a volunteer for Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, U.S. Forest Service. 2007. I conducted surveys for the Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly (Icaricia shasta charlestonensis), a taxon that has been petitioned for listing as an endangered species, for the purpose of developing a better understanding of the distribution and ecology of this species. This butterfly is endemic to the Spring Mountains of southern Nevada, is subject to a Conservation Agreement between the U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, as well as the Clark County Multiple Species Conservation Plan, and has been petitioned for listing as an endangered species. Previous records of this butterfly were predominantly from a ski run, which was alleged to be an important key habitat for the butterfly, and it was alleged that the butterfly had only one species of host plant which was considered to be of very limited distribution and highly sensitive to disturbance by human activities. However, one report from 1995 described this butterfly and its host plant as widespread, but generally found at high elevation areas that are difficult for people to access. The butterfly is a named subspecies of a widespread species that is primarily found at high elevations in mountain meadows, where it is known to feed on at least 14 species of plants. By hiking repeatedly to the highest elevations in the Spring Mountains and searching for butterflies and host plants, I documented distribution of Mount Charleston Blue butterflies and potential habitat for them that greatly exceeded the previously known range. I documented presence and general distribution of six species of plants in the Spring Mountains that are known to be food plants for the butterfly species elsewhere in its range. At areas where butterflies had previously been located most frequently, conditions for the growth of the food plant appear to be dependent upon disturbance by human activities. I examined the literature on butterfly and host plant ecology and prepared a report that included findings and suggestions for future efforts (Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly (Icaricia shasta charlestonensis): Observations and Speculations – 2007). I made suggestions for further investigation and hypotheses to be tested, and recommended that a minimum of a detailed two-year study of the autecology of the butterfly be conducted before a decision on whether or not it should be listed as endangered could be supported. In addition, I prepared a teaching collection of butterflies for training Forest Service personnel. For this and other volunteer work, I received the Volunteer of the Year award by Get Outdoors Nevada, an interagency volunteer network. Contact: Amy Nichols, Natural Resource Officer and Volunteer Coordinator, Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, 4701 North Torrey Pines Drive. Las Vegas, NV 89130. (702) 515-5421. anichols@fs.fed.us Invertebrates of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. For U.S. National Park Service. 1987-1990. I led a team that conducted a 3-year study on ecology of invertebrates as part of a multidisciplinary 14-project Sensitive Ecosystems Program. We observed and collected invertebrates at 16 ecologically distinct sites. We collected and curated more than 4,200 13
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 14 specimens of arthropods and snails. I developed a computer database on over 5,000 observations, and published a Technical Report: K.J. Kingsley. 1998. Invertebrates of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. Technical Report No. 60. U.S. Geological Survey. Cooperative Park Studies Unit. University of Arizona. 187 pp. And wrote a protocol for continued monitoring: K.J. Kingsley. 1995. Invertebrate Monitoring Protocol for the Ecological Monitoring Program in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. In: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Ecological Monitoring Protocol Manual. Special Report No. 11. National Biological Service Cooperative Park Studies Unit. School of Renewable Natural Resources. The University of Arizona. Grasshoppers and Butterflies as Indicator Species Evaluation. 1985-1987. I collected and observed grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae and Tettigoniidae) and butterflies (Lepidoptera: Hesperidae, Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, Libytheidae, and Nymphalidae) at the Quitobaquito Management Area in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. I took nine field trips to the area over a period of two years. I prepared a technical report (K.J. Kingsley and R.A. Bailowitz. 1987. Grasshoppers and Butterflies of the Quitobaquito Management Area, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. National Park Service/University of Arizona Tech. Rep. No. 21 CPSU Contrib. 055/01. Tucson, Arizona 24 pp.). Seventeen species of Orthoptera and 52 species of Lepidoptera were found. Species accounts, including food plants, microhabitat selection, relative abundance and constancy, and information on the role in the ecosystem and relationship to human activity, where appropriate, were reported for each species. The area is recovering from intensive human use for many years, including small scale agriculture and grazing by cattle. It includes a high degree of diversity of plants and microhabitats, and the diversity of grasshoppers and butterflies reflects this history and diversity. The area supports a diverse resident community of grasshoppers and butterflies and is also an important stop-over area for transient butterflies. No apparent threats to the insect community were discovered. The insect community itself creates little or no problem for management consideration, with the possible exception of grasshopper feeding causing slight retardation of recovery from overgrazing. Conservation Agreement for the San Xavier Talus Snail. For Arizona Electric Power Cooperative. 1998. I evaluated a draft of a conservation agreement for the protection of this snail, which is known only from a small area adjacent to a microwave tower and access road. Visited the site and assessed effects of the agreement on the snail and the maintenance needs for the road and tower, and advised the client on terms of the agreement. 14
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 15 Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly Studies (perhaps the most unpopular endangered species) In a small remnant patch of sand dunes near Colton, California, along Interstate 10 between Riverside and Ontario, one of the most endangered species known barely survives. Much maligned for holding up development and costing developers potential millions of dollars, this rare creature has been used as a symbol of ―What’s Wrong with the Endangered Species Act‖ by some people, and ―What’s Happened to our Environment‖ by others. I began studying the Fly in 1994, when flies were found to be present in what was planned to be the parking lot of a new regional hospital. I developed a habitat avoidance and management plan that created an 8-acre preserve for the Fly and enabled the hospital to be built. I produced a 10-minute video for educational purposes, showing details of the life of the Fly and detailing why it was endangered. Portions of this video have been shown on NBC and CBS national news. Continuing over the next several years at the behest of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, I directed a team of researchers in a detailed study of the behavioral ecology and conservation biology of the Fly. My team compiled over 11,000 observations of fly behavior and resource use. Studying the Fly is not easy. Flies are active as above-ground adults for only a few weeks each year during the hottest part of the summer. The Fly’s environment is open sand dunes beside a major interstate highway. Activity normally begins once the ambient temperature exceeds 100 degrees F. and continues through the hottest part of the day. Although large, for a fly, this creature blends in well with its environment, and it can move at speeds in excess of 50 miles per hour. My study determined that, based on the period of study, the Fly population appears to be stable at this site and the preserve has been successful. I analyzed the observations, and wrote two papers that were published in peer-reviewed journals. K.J. Kingsley. 2002. Population Dynamics, Resource Use, and Conservation Needs of the Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis Cazier) (Diptera: Mydidae), an Endangered Species. Journal of Insect Conservation 6: 93-101. K.J. Kingsley. 1996. Behavior of the Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly (Diptera: Mydidae), a Little-known Endangered Species. Annals of the Entomological Society of America 89: 883- 891. For this work, I was awarded the Forgotten Pollinators Award by the Xerces Society and the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum. I presented a paper at an international scientific symposium. Conservation Biology of the Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly. Invited Speaker in Symposium on Pollinator Restoration. Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Meeting. Fort Lauderdale, Florida. 1997. 15
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 16 Surveys and Conservation Plans for Subterranean Invertebrates Endangered Hawaiian Invertebrates Survey. For Ka'upulehu Developments. 1994. I investigated 36 lava tubes (caves) on the island of Hawaii for suitable habitat and presence of invertebrates of special concern on 2,000-acre site. I documented presence of non-native invertebrate species in most tubes. In this area, all lava tubes of sufficient size were used as burial sites by ancient Hawaiians, so conducting this survey required extreme care not to disturb important cultural artifacts and graves. I wrote a report that received a letter of commendation from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for exemplary work in the protection of Hawaiian Invertebrates. Cave Preserve Management and Monitoring Plans. For Bexar County (Texas) Cave Conservation Coalition. 1992-2000. Several species of cave-dwelling invertebrates are listed as endangered or threatened in the Edwards Escarpment karst region of Texas. The process of their listing was controversial, and land owners would have preferred to have had a conservation agreement to protect the species and obviate listing. Over a period of eight years, I was involved in the controversy, working for the land owners. Eventually, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service did list the species, but accepted as valid a conservation plan that I had contributed to. I designed and wrote pilot plans for preserving and monitoring caves known to contain rare invertebrates. I conducted surveys in caves and above ground to evaluate conditions and presence of species of concern. Working with a Total Station Operator and GIS expert, I delineated areas to preserve by fencing and designed plans for monitoring and fire ant control. I worked with land owners and the Fish and Wildlife Service to develop viable conservation plans. Several publications and presentations grew out of my work in Texas karst invertebrate protection: K. White and K. J. Kingsley. 2001. Principles and Practice for Design of Cave Preserve Management and Monitoring Plans for Invertebrate Species of Concern, San Antonio, Texas. Proceedings of the 14th National Cave and Karst Management Symposium, Chattanooga, Tennessee. October 19-22, 1999. pp. 203-208. K.J. Kingsley. 1999. Development of a Conservation Agreement to Protect Cave Invertebrates and Obviate Listing as Endangered Species in Bexar County, Texas. Proceedings of the 1997 Cave and Karst Management Symposium 13th National Cave Management Symposium, Bellingham, Washington. Guidelines and Criteria for Creating Karst Ecosystem Preserves. Section on Endangered Animals (moderator of two paper sessions). Society for Ecological Restoration Annual Meeting. Austin, Texas. 1998. 16
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 17 Integrated Pest Management Plans Bionomics and Management of Pest Mosquitoes at the Agro-urban Interface, Santa Cruz Valley, Arizona. (My doctoral dissertation.) The world’s largest irrigated pecan orchard is adjacent to one of the largest retirement communities: Green Valley, Arizona. Flood irrigation of the pecans produced huge numbers of mosquitoes (Aedes vexans and Psorophora columbiae) that invaded the retirement community and engendered complaints to the local health department. Threats of an injunction against irrigation and subsequent loss of the area’s primary industry that provided jobs for several hundred people loomed as a possibility. The usual sequence for the farmers was: irrigate, wait for complaints, spray with malathion or other insecticide, then irrigate again. This resulted in the farm laborers enduring up to 100 mosquito bites per minute, with more mosquitoes developing throughout the summer, and increased numbers of insecticide resistant pecan aphids, the only agricultural pest, due to the loss of natural control by predators and disease. I conducted the first large-scale agricultural tests of a new mosquito-specific insecticide, the bacterial product Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti). Today, that material is the leading mosquito control agent in the world. I developed an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program based on use of Bti and water management that could be applied inexpensively by farm laborers. That program caused a drop to less than one bite per person per day for farm workers, an end of complaints, and happy farmers and residents. Presented papers at professional society meetings: Large-scale Application of B.t.i. for Management of Floodwater Mosquitoes in Irrigated Pecan Orchards. American Mosquito Control Association, New Orleans, LA. 1986. Mosquito Problems at the Agro-urban Interface, Santa Cruz Valley, Arizona. Arizona- Nevada Academy of Science. Tucson, AZ. 1984. Integrated Pest Management Program for Pecan Orchard. For Farmers' Investment Company. 1986-1987. I developed an integrated pest management system for pecan aphids and pest mosquitoes on the world's largest irrigated pecan orchard. I developed sampling and testing protocols, evaluated pesticide applications and releases of predators, developed a bacteriological control method for mosquito larvae and enhancement techniques for predators and parasites of aphids. This program enabled growers to reduce pesticide applications by 90%. I served as liaison for growers with public and regulatory agencies. I published a paper and presented talks at several professional society and growers organization meetings: K.J. Kingsley. 1987. Arizona Aphid Population Trend, Present Situation, and Results of Insecticide Applications. Proceedings of the Western Pecan Conference. 21: 68-75. Arizona Aphid Population Trends and the Effects of Insecticides. Western Irrigated Pecan Growers Assoc. Las Cruces, NM. 1987. Practical Applications of Biological Control for Pecan Aphids. California Pecan Growers Assoc. Visalia, CA. 1987. 17
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 18 Most of my work in IPM has dealt with mosquitoes in created and managed wetlands. Examples of some of those projects are: Baseline Mosquito Survey, Santa Cruz River Habitat Restoration Areas. For Pima County, Arizona, Flood Control District. 2004-2005. I conducted a study of baseline conditions for mosquitoes in an area that is planned for a riparian restoration project. Data documented existing mosquito larval habitats and adult population size and distribution prior to construction of the project. Baseline Mosquito Survey, Agua Caliente Park. For Pima County, Arizona, Flood Control District and Parks and Recreation Department. 2003. Mosquitoes were considered as a potential problem in the design and future management of a proposed major renovation of a wetland park. I developed low-cost sampling methods for mosquitoes at the park and a nearby spring complex. I trained park employees and volunteers in mosquito trapping. I sampled for potential mosquito habitats, analyzed data, and wrote a report. This study found that mosquito diversity was very high, but total numbers were very low under existing conditions. Specific design and management methods were developed and submitted to the park planning process to reduce the potential for mosquito problems. Mosquito Monitoring and Abatement Program, Sweetwater Wetlands. For City of Tucson Water Department. 2000-2001. I evaluated control methods and advised site personnel on management of mosquitoes at a created effluent treatment wetlands. Developed and conducted a program of surveillance and monitoring that includes evaluation and fine tuning of control methods, with the goal of increasing effectiveness and decreasing costs. Analyzed data and wrote annual reports. I presented findings orally at meetings with client, agencies, and public. Integrated Pest Management Program for Central Avra Valley Storage and Recovery Project. For City of Tucson Water Department. 1997-2001. I developed a mosquito IPM program for a major water recharge development project. Collaborated with engineering firm in planning facility to reduce potential for mosquito larval sites and ease of application of control measures. Developed program of sampling and least toxic methodology for control, collected baseline data, and met with project oversight committee. Maintained adult sampling program for three years. Mosquito Control Plan. For The Nature Conservancy. 1993. I conducted an investigation of mosquito habitats on Scott Matheson Wetlands Preserve, Moab, Utah. I advised The Nature Conservancy and Moab Mosquito Abatement District on techniques for management of sensitive wetlands and sampling protocols for pest mosquitoes in a natural wetland complex adjacent to a rapidly developing resort community. Mosquito Control Plan. For Arizona Electric Power Cooperative. 1993. I developed an IPM program for pest mosquitoes in created wetlands at Apache Power Station, Cochise, Arizona. Trained personnel in evaluation and application techniques. As a by-product of these projects, I co-authored a peer-reviewed paper: 18
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 19 Karpiscak, M. M., K. J. Kingsley, R. D. Wass, F. A. Amalfi, J. Friel, A. M. Stewart, J. Tabor, and J. Zauderer. 2004. Constructed wetland technology and mosquito populations in Arizona. Journal of Arid Environments 56: 681-707. And presented a talk at a meeting of resource managers and planners: K. J. Kingsley and Martin M. Karspiscak. 2002. A Plea for Gathering Data on Mosquito Populations for Areas with Proposed Aquatic and Wetland Projects. Meeting Resource Management Information Needs: Fourth Conference on Research and Resource Management in the Southwestern Deserts, Extended Abstracts. Edited by W.L. Halvorson and B.S. Gebow. 2002. USGS Sonoran Desert Field Station, The University of Arizona, Tucson. BIRD STUDIES My career as a scientist began when I arrived at Prescott College as a transfer student in 1970. I met my advisor, Dr. R. Roy Johnson, and he invited me to go bird watching with him. On my first birding trip with him, I was introduced to his friend Steven W. Carothers. Johnson and Carothers had a project studying the birds of the cottonwood-willow riparian community along the Verde River in central Arizona. They hired me as an assistant and taught me the basics of conducting bird surveys. I worked for them for three years, and collected some of the data that went into a landmark paper that marked the start of quantitative riparian ecology: Carothers, S.W. R. R. Johnson, and S.W. Aitchison. 1974. Population Structure and Social Organization of Southwestern Riparian Birds. American Zoologist 14: 97-108. Money I earned as a bird surveyor paid my way through college. My working relationship and friendship Photo by Amy Gaiennie with Johnson and Carothers continues to this day, and avian studies have been an important part of my career. While working on a study of insects in the world’s largest irrigated pecan orchard, I kept notes on the birds that I observed. I found a striking similarity to the birds of the native riparian communities I had studied earlier, and presented this information at several meetings of scientists: The Pecan Orchard as a Riparian Ecosystem. Interagency North American Conference on Riparian Ecosystems and their Management. Tucson, AZ. 1985. Pecan Farming: Repercussions of the Creation of a "Georgia Swamp" in the Sonoran Desert. Invited paper. Symposium on Interactions Among Plants and Animals in the Western Deserts. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Tucson, AZ. 1985. These presented papers were subsequently the basis for publications: K.J. Kingsley. 1985. The Pecan Orchard as a Riparian Ecosystem. Pp. 245-249. In: R.R. Johnson, C.D. Ziebell, D.R. Patton, P.F. Folliott, and R.H. Hamre (Tech. Coords.). Riparian 19
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 20 Ecosystems and their Management: Reconciling Conflicting Uses (First North American Riparian Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-120). Ft. Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 523 pp. K.J. Kingsley. 1989. Biological and Social Repercussions of Irrigated Pecan Agriculture in Southern Arizona. pp. 131-150. In J.O. Schmidt (Ed.) Special Biotic Relationships in the Arid Southwest. University of New Mexico Press. 152 pp. As a volunteer, I assisted Bryan T. Brown in conducting surveys of the birds of the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon National Park. This was four annual breeding season river trips, floating in small oar-powered rafts, identifying and counting birds along the river transect, and conducting intensive surveys and nest searches in patches of riparian vegetation. Results of this work became the basis for Brown’s doctoral dissertation and a book by Brown, Johnson, and Carothers: Birds of Grand Canyon. My first project with SWCA Environmental Consultants (by the way, the SWC of SWCA is Steven W. Carothers, who I worked with in the 1970s) was to conduct daytime follow-up surveys for Mexican Spotted Owls in the Gila National Forest. This was followed by additional surveys for Spotted Owls, plus surveys for Black-capped Vireo and Golden-cheeked Warblers in the Texas hill country. Throughout the 15 years I worked for SWCA, I continued to do bird surveys, including general surveys of birds in particular habitats, and surveys for threatened and endangered species. I took special training in conducting surveys for Mexican Spotted Owl, Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl, and Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and had permits to conduct calling surveys for those species. I have conducted species-specific surveys for the following species: cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl, Mexican spotted owl, Yuma clapper rail, southwestern willow flycatcher, golden-cheeked warbler, black-capped vireo, yellow-billed cuckoo, bald eagle, American peregrine falcon, northern goshawk, common black hawk, northern gray hawk, zone-tailed hawk, native Hawaiian birds and general surveys for all birds. Some of the projects I have conducted are: Important Bird Area Monitoring Surveys. As a volunteer for Arizona State Parks. 2005-2006. I conducted transect and point count surveys following IBA protocols of birds in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Surveys. As a volunteer for Arizona State Parks. 2005-2006. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocol for this endangered species in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo Surveys. As a volunteer for Arizona State Parks. 2005-2006. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved protocol Photo by Amy Gaiennie for this species in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural 20
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 21 Area. I delivered a presentation at a regional meeting of The Wildlife Society. National Marsh Bird Surveys. As a volunteer for Arizona State Parks. 2006. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved protocol for marsh birds in the Verde River Greenway State Natural Area, including Tavasci Marsh. Avian Inventory - Santa Cruz River. For U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. 1999-2000. I was the Principal Investigator on a project to determine the species richness and relative species abundance for bird species along an effluent-dominated stretch of the Santa Cruz River from the Roger Road Wastewater Treatment Plant to the Pima/Pinal County line. I conducted transect surveys along five one-half mile long study reaches three times in each of four seasons. A total of 133 bird species was found to use the area. I prepared a report that detailed findings and related them to vegetation and water conditions. I presented a poster at a planning conference, and an oral presentation to the annual meeting of the Arizona Riparian Council. I have presented papers at various scientific meetings dealing with birds: Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo at Sonoita Creek State Natural Area. Paper presented at 39th Joint Annual Meeting of the Arizona and New Mexico Chapters of The Wildlife Society and Arizona/New Mexico Chapter of the American Fisheries Society. Flagstaff, Arizona, February 2-4, 2006. With Amy J. Gaiennie and Jennifer Parks. Birds of the Effluent-dominated Lower Santa Cruz River. Arizona Riparian Council. Tucson, Arizona. May 14, 2001. With Thomas E. Furgason. Avian Surveys of the Lower Santa Cruz River. Poster Presentation. Symposium for Planning for the Santa Cruz River. Tucson, Arizona. March 30, 2001. With Thomas Furgason, Mike List, Lara Mitchell, and Elizabeth Vinson. Pygmy-owl Survey Protocol. Invited speaker. CLE International Conference on Endangered Species Act. Phoenix, Arizona. Nov. 16, 2000. With Daniel Godec. Pygmy-owl and Other Fine Feathered Friends. Preservation, Development, Economics, and Other Concerns. Panel presentation, CLE International Conference on Arizona Land Use Law. Phoenix, AZ. December 7, 1999. Urban Environments and the Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum): a Profile of Endangerment of a Species. Proceedings of the Fourth International Urban Wildlife Symposium, Tucson, Arizona. 1999. With R. Roy Johnson, Richard L. Glinski, and Steven W. Carothers. I also served as moderator of a session on Endangered Animals and guided a birding field trip. I have been the co-author of the following published papers on birds: R. R. Johnson, R. L. Glinski, S. W. Carothers, and K. J. Kingsley. 2004. Urban Environments and the Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum): a Profile of Endangerment of a Species. Pp. 135-145 In: W.W. Shaw, L.K. Harris, and L. VanDruff. Proceedings of the Fourth International Symposium on Urban Wildlife Conservation. May 1-5, 1999. Tucson, Arizona. 368 pp. R. R. Johnson, J.-L. E. Cartron, L.T. Haight, R.B. Duncan, and K.J. Kingsley. 2003. Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owl in Arizona, 1872-1971. Southwestern Naturalist 48(3):389-401. R.R. Johnson, J.-L. E. Cartron, L. T. Haight, R. B. Duncan, and K. J. Kingsley. 2000. A historical perspective on the population decline of the cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl in Arizona. Chapter 2 (pp. 17-26) In: J.-L. E. Cartron and D. M. Finch, eds. Ecology and 21
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 22 Conservation of the Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-owl in Arizona. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMS- GTR-43. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, ForestService, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 68 pp. In the course of my consulting career, I prepared dozens of reports that dealt with birds. Most of these became parts of Biological Evaluations or other reports. As a volunteer, I conducted a year-long survey of birds of Cienega Creek County Preserve, based on monthly transect surveys. This led to the preserve being nominated as an Important Bird Area under the National Audubon Society’s program. I wrote a report on my findings and submitted it to Pima County Flood Control District, managers of the Preserve. Other Photo by Amy Gaiennie volunteer work I have done that involves birds includes: Winter Sparrow Banding in Southeastern Arizona Grasslands, with Dr. Janet Ruth, U.S. Geological Survey Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas – two blocks surveyed Tucson Bird Count – three successive years for same route Christmas Bird Count – Atascosa Highlands, six successive years I continue to enjoy recreational birding, and serve as a birding guide for bird walks and pontoon boat tours. I especially delight in guiding enthusiastic beginning birders. MAMMAL SURVEYS AND STUDIES Master of Science degree. 1981. Biology. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. My Master’s thesis: Mammals of the Grapevine Mountains, Death Valley National Monument, was a classic style survey of the mammals of a mountain range. The Grapevine Mountains is a largely wilderness area of approximately 500 square miles that forms the northeast corner of Death Valley National Park. Elevations range from -120 to +8,700 feet above sea level, and the range has six major biotic communities, riparian and spring communities and Photo by Julia Fonseca many old mines. I conducted a survey of the mammals using live and snap trapping, tracking, bat netting, aerial survey, exploring inactive mines for their use and suitability as habitats for bats and other wildlife species, and time-lapse 22
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 23 movie photography at springs. A total of 42 species were recorded. Trapping included 4,937 trap-nights for rodents, using both live and snap traps. A total of 854 individuals of 16 species were caught, and 413 specimens were prepared and deposited in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley. My thesis was published as part of the National Park Service Technical Reports Series. K.J. Kingsley. 1981. Mammals of the Grapevine Mountains, Death Valley National Monument. National Park Service/University of Nevada at Las Vegas Contrib. No. CPSU/UNLV No. 018/05 Tech. Rep. Series. Las Vegas. 190 pp. K.J. Kingsley and C.L. Douglas. 1981. Bighorn Habitat Evaluation and Management Guidelines for the Grapevine Mountains, Death Valley National Monument. National Park Service/University of Nevada at Las Vegas Contrib No. CPSU/UNLV No. 023/01 Tech. Report Series. Las Vegas: 16 pp. Some of the other projects involving a component of mammals that I have worked on include: Preliminary Inventory of Wildlife Species for Posey Well, San Simon, Arizona. For U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). 2006. A wildlife habitat improvement project is planned to be conducted by the BLM at a 60-acre site known as Posey Well near San Simon, Cochise County, Arizona. A pre- and post- project inventory of wildlife species is needed to document the potential impacts of the proposed project. I conducted a pre-project inventory of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and plants present and detectable under conditions at the time of the inventory, 5-7 April, 2006, and prepared a report documenting findings. The site has four distinct biological communities. Plants were identified to species, when possible under existing conditions, and notes on relative abundance, condition of population, and utilization by wildlife were compiled. The relevé method by ocular estimate, using the scale of Braun-Blanquet, was used to record stratum and abundance (as related to cover) of plants that could be identified readily in the field. Live trapping for rodents was done along transect lines through each community. Pitfall trap arrays for reptiles were placed in each community. Mist netting, ultrasonic bat detectors, and night vision scope observations were used for bats. Transect counts and point counts were used for birds. Standing water was visually examined for aquatic organisms. I wrote a report detailing findings. Status Review of Merriam’s Mouse (Peromyscus merriami) in Pima County. For Pima County Flood Control District. 2004-2005. Merriam’s Mouse was being considered for potential listing as an endangered species because of alleged habitat destruction by human activities. I collaborated with the County to prepare and submit a successful grant application to the Arizona Natural Heritage Program, administered by the Arizona Game and Fish Department. The study involved examination of specimens and field notes of collectors, review of data on specimens in museums, evaluation of existing habitat potential at the sites where the species has been historically found, selection of potential locations for further study, and live-trapping at 19 selected sites to determine whether the species is still present. Samples were collected for DNA analysis, which was conducted by the laboratory of Dr. Brett Riddle, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. I found that Photo by Julia Fonseca 23
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 24 this species is widespread and not rare, is found in a variety of mesquite-dominated habitats, and is still present at or near locations where it was historically found throughout its geographic range. However, it is extremely difficult to identify, and very few people have the expertise to identify it positively. Bat Surveys. For various mining companies and other clients. Continuing since 1978, I conducted surveys of inactive mine sites for bats that use them as roosts. I surveyed several hundred inactive mines for use by bats in Arizona, Nevada, and California. This included complete surveys of all adits that were safe enough to enter, and twilight watches at unsafe sites using night vision apparatus and ultrasonic bat detectors, including the ANABAT system. It also included a structural evaluation of an inactive mine known to be used by bats, and advising engineers on approaches to ensure the long-term stability of the site without adversely impacting bats. Many reports on these surveys were prepared, but they were only included in the context of consulting reports and Biological Evaluations. In collaboration with a few other students of caves and mines, I presented a poster presentation and published a short abstract summarizing the results of these studies: K.J. Kingsley, T.R. Strong, E. L. Smith, and T. K. Snow. 2002. Caves and Mine Adits as Wildlife Resources in the Sonoran Desert Region. Proceedings of the 15th National Cave and Karst Management Symposium. Tucson, Arizona. October 16-19. pp. 138-140. Black Mesa Wildlife Monitoring. For Peabody Coal Company. 1997. In collaboration with a junior colleague, Bryce Marshall, I conducted surveys for small mammals and bats on reclaimed coal mining land on the Navajo Reservation. We developed an experimental design to test the hypothesis that mammal use of surface depressions that occurred incidental to backfilling mine pits was not different from mammal use of other reclaimed areas, particularly for the Mexican vole and several bat species of concern. We sampled using live trapping, mark-recapture, and ANABAT surveys. We found that the surface depressions appeared to be used more by the mammals, perhaps because they concentrated and held moisture that resulted in increased vegetation growth compared to areas without depressions. I participated in fieldwork and data analysis and reviewed the report written by my colleague. Panel of Experts on the Effects of Grazing on Mammals and Upland Birds. For U.S. Forest Service. 1999. I participated in two panels of experts, one for mammals, the other for birds, evaluating the current state of knowledge of the effects of Forest Service grazing programs on species native to Arizona and New Mexico. The teams evaluated known and suspected potential effects of grazing on every species known to occur on Forest Service land in the Southwestern Region. 24
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 25 FISH AND AMPHIBIAN SURVEYS AND STUDIES Aravaipa Creek Fish Survey. 2002-2005. As a perennial volunteer over four years, I participated in twice-yearly three-day seining and electrofishing surveys of seven species of native fish in Aravaipa Creek. I collaborated as a team member with personnel of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Game and Fish Department, University of Arizona, Arizona State University and The Nature Conservancy. In the final year, I also provided catering service for the team of 20, cooking Dutch oven campfire dinners. Chiricahua Leopard Frog Baseline Survey. For Chilton Ranch, Arivaca, Arizona. 2004. I conducted a baseline survey for frogs on a ranch, examining stockponds, natural stream channels, and water troughs for use by the threatened Chiricahua leopard frog. The purpose of this study was to determine a baseline, prefatory to developing a Safe Harbor Agreement for introduction of threatened frogs to waters of the ranch. No Chiricahua leopard frogs were found, and conditions were not suitable for establishing them unless habitat modifications were made. O’Donnell Creek Fish Restoration. For The Nature Conservancy and Arizona Game and Fish Department. 2003. As a volunteer, I participated in renovation of a creek to remove non-native fish and restore native fish. I led a team of volunteers, operated a backpack fish shocker and directed the capture and processing of fish. Cave Creek Fish Survey. For Spur Cross Ranch. 1996. I collaborated in an electrofishing survey with biologists from the US Fish and Wildlife Service and Arizona Game and Fish Department surveying a reach of stream for fish species. Only non-native species were found. Salamander Surveys. For various private landowners in central Texas. 1992-1994. I conducted surveys, above and below ground, for salamanders of various species. I found several species of salamanders, including some rare and special status species. I also compiled, reviewed, and interpreted the literature on subterranean salamanders to inform clients of potential conservation approaches. 25
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 26 PLANT SURVEYS AND STUDIES Distribution of Vascular Plant Species and Current Conditions of the Vegetation Community – 2006, Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. For Arizona State Parks. As a volunteer, I examined 199 points within a state park area that included natural riparian and upland areas as well as developed recreational facilities. At each point, I recorded GPS coordinates (UTM), identified all identifiable plant species within a 10-meter radius circle, and took photographs in each cardinal direction. I compiled the data into a spreadsheet, used it to document occurrence and associations for 150 taxa of vascular plants. I wrote a report documenting findings and produced maps of the distributions of species of special concern. Vegetation Surveys of Sonoita Creek State Natural Area (SCSNA). For Arizona State Parks. 2005. SCSNA is an area of approximately 8,000 acres managed by the Arizona State Parks Department for the protection of natural resource values. As a volunteer, I conducted a study to evaluate riparian vegetation along Sonoita Creek with regard to habitat suitability for special status birds (Southwestern Willow Flycatcher and Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo) and to assess the current conditions and health of the riparian vegetation with regard to reproduction, survival, and growth of trees. At each of 11 points along the creek, I sampled three transects that crossed the creek and extended to the end of the riparian community. I measured canopy and ground cover, identified trees to species and measured their heights and diameters for at least 50 trees per site, identified all identifiable plants to species and ranked each as to cover and/or abundance, and took photographs in each cardinal direction. The general picture of riparian vegetation within SCSNA is one of large trees, mostly Fremont Cottonwood and Goodding’s Willow, bordered by mesquite bosques in some reaches. Vegetation is heavily grazed by cattle, and most of the trees have browse lines. Very few seedlings of cottonwoods or willows were found. Data from vegetation sampling suggests that trees are not reproducing sufficiently to sustain the vegetation communities indefinitely. Riparian vegetation along most of the length of Sonoita Creek in SCSNA is consistent with the currently understood concept of suitability for Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo but not for Southwestern Willow Flycatcher. This conclusion is supported by results of species-specific surveys for these two birds which were reported separately. No Southwestern Willow Flycatchers were found, but 26
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 27 Western Yellow-billed Cuckoos were found to be present through the study area. Despite the obvious impacts of heavy grazing on the area, there may be other factors that influence the condition of vegetation along Sonoita Creek. Hydrologic changes resulting from impacts to the watershed, floodplain, and stream by many factors, including the railroad berm and the Patagonia Lake dam undoubtedly have some effects. Several exotic species, including Bermuda grass, compete with the native understories and may also reduce suitable sites for establishment of young cottonwoods and willows. Bermuda grass was found at every site studied, and was an especially important component of ground cover within the cottonwood-willow community, where it covered up to 18 percent of the ground. It is evident that the mesquite bosque community in SCSNA consists of mostly large, probably even- aged, trees and there is little or no recruitment of young trees. Conditions suitable for bosque establishment appear to be no longer present. Y WILLOW HACKBERRY DEAD G WILLOW ASH JUNIPER WALNUT SYCAMORE B WILLOW MESQUITE COTTONWOOD N= 594 Species composition of trees in the riparian area of Sonoita Creek State Natural Area 27
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 28 Range Condition Survey of the Navajo Nation Forest. For E.T.D. Environmental Consulting (contractors to the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Navajo Nation Forestry Department). 1997. As part of a Forest Management Plan Environmental Impact Statement, I developed an efficient sampling program and conducted vegetation surveys and analyzed data to evaluate range conditions on the 680,000-acre forest. I selected representative sites within the various vegetation communities and conducted line-intersect surveys. I found a clear trend of increasing health of the range, as documented by the density and species composition of the vegetation and presence of microphytic crusts. I wrote a technical memorandum report on findings. Surveys for plant species of special concern. For many clients. As part of my consulting work, I conducted surveys for rare and endangered plant species in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Utah, California, and Hawai’i. These include the species listed below: Abutilon parishii Echinomastus intertextus Acacia koaia Eriophyllum mohavense Agave arizonica Errazurizia rotundata Agave parviflora Exocarpos guadichaudii Allium gooddingii Gnaphalium sandwicensium molokaiense Amsonia peeblesii Hedeoma diffusum Arctomecon californica Hedyotis elatior Arctomecon humilis Helianthemum dumosum Aster concolor Helianthus niveus tephrodes Astragalus geyeri triquetrus Joinvillea ascendens ascendens Astragalus jaegerianus Kokia cookei Astragalus xiphoides Lilaeopsis schaffneriana recurva Cassia armata Lobelia dunbarii paniculata Canavalia molokaiensis Lobelia dunbarii dunbarii Cereus greggii Mammilaria wrightii Chamaesyce platysperma Marsilea villosa Chamaesyce skottsbergii skottsbergii Melicope reflexa Chamaesyce skottsbergii vaccinioides Mimulus mohavensis Chorizanthe spinosa Neraudia sericea Chrysothamnus teretifolius Notholaena lemmonii Chrysothamnus molesta Opuntia wigginsii Clematis hirsutissima arizonica Palafoxia arida gigantea Clermontia oblongifolia brevipes Pediocactus papyracanthus Coryphantha alvesonii Pediocactus peeblesianus peeblesianus Coryphantha recurvata Pediocactus peeblesianus fickeiseniae Coryphantha scheeri robustispina Pediocactus sileri Cyanea manni Pediocactus simpsonii Cyanea procera Penstemon albomarginatus Cymopterus deserticola Penstemon bicolor Cyrtandra lydgatei Penstemon clutei Cyrtandra macrocalyx Penstemon discolor Dalea tentaculoides Phacelia anelsonii Diellia erecta Phacelia parishii Echinocactus horizonthalonius nicholii Philadephus ernestii Echinocereus triglochidiatus arizonicus Pholisma arenarium Echinomastus erectocentra acunensis Pholisma sonorae Echinomastus erectocentrus erectocentrus Plantago principes laxiflora 28
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 29 Platanthera holochila Portulaca villosa Prenanthes serpentaria Puccinellia parishii Purshia subintegra Ranunculus mauiensis Salix arizonica Schiedea lydgatei Schiedea menziesii Sclerocactus polyancistrus Senecio franciscanus Sesbania tomentosa Sicyos cucumerinus Sisymbrium fuscatum Spharalcea rusbyi eremicola Spiranthes delitescens Stenogyne bifida Streptanthus bracteatus Talinum validulum Tetramolopium rockii calcisabulorum Tetramologium rockii rockii Tumamoca macdougalii Vigna o-wahuensis 29
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 30 MULTIPLE TAXA SURVEYS AND STUDIES Preliminary Inventory of Wildlife Species for Posey Well, San Simon, Arizona. For U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). 2006. A wildlife habitat improvement project is planned to be conducted by the BLM at a 60-acre site known as Posey Well near San Simon, Cochise County, Arizona. A pre- and post- project inventory of wildlife species is needed to document the potential impacts of the proposed project. I conducted a pre-project inventory of birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and plants present and detectable under conditions at the time of the inventory, 5-7 April, 2006, and prepared a report documenting findings. The site has four distinct biological communities. Plants were identified to species, when possible under existing conditions, and notes on relative abundance, condition of population, and utilization by wildlife were compiled. The relevé method by ocular estimate, using the scale of Braun-Blanquet, was used to record stratum and abundance (as related to cover) of plants that could be identified readily in the field. Live trapping for rodents was done along transect lines through each community. Pitfall trap arrays for reptiles were placed in each community. Mist netting, ultrasonic bat detectors, and night vision scope observations were used for bats. Transect counts and point counts were used for birds. Standing water was visually examined for aquatic organisms. Biological Considerations and Opportunities for the A7 Ranch Property near Redington in Pima and Cochise Counties, Arizona. For City of Tucson. 2002. The City of Tucson became the owner of an approximately 41,094 acre ranch. I prepared a report that summarizes observations and available information on the A7 Ranch with regard to wildlife and plant species that are considered special status species. Species considered (11 plants, 16 invertebrates, 9 fish, 2 amphibians, 9 reptiles, 20 birds, and 13 mammals) were those that are currently listed, proposed, or candidates for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA); species considered as Wildlife Species of Special Concern In Arizona (WSCA) by the Arizona Game and Fish Department that are known to occur in the general area of the A7 Ranch; species included as Priority Vulnerable Species in Pima County’s Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan; and species considered Sensitive by the U.S. Forest Service. The report was prepared at the request of the City of Tucson to support decisions that might be made in evaluating the future ownership and management of the A7 Ranch property. It includes a review of potential opportunities for mitigation and habitat enhancement for the species considered as potentially occurring on the property. Ecological Constraints and Opportunities for Molokai Ranch, Molokai, Hawaii. For Molokai Ranch, Ltd. 1995. I conducted a general survey of 50,000-acre ranch, with focus on water lines and intakes, for threatened and endangered species. I compiled data on 65 special status species of plants and animals and potential impacts to them. I hiked along the entire route of a 10-mile water line from the top (3,000+ feet elevation) of the island to the west coast, and evaluated occurrence of native plants and animals. I wrote a report that evaluated potential constraints to development, environmental laws and concerns that must be a factor, and potential opportunities for beneficial actions for developing ranch land and activities. Biological Evaluation of the Apache-Hayden Transmission Line. For Arizona Electric Power Cooperative. 1996. Conducted survey and review for 67 special status species of plants and animals, prepared vegetation map, and wrote report that reviewed potential environmental issues for 90-mile power transmission line. 30
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 31 NATURAL RESOURCE CONSERVATION PLANNING Rockin’ River Ranch, Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. For Arizona State Parks. 2009. We investigated a 209-acre property that was added to the Greenway in 2008. We wrote a Biological Evaluation, a Draft Management Plan, and a report on photopoints that we established for subsequent monitoring. We prepared and presented a PowerPoint program on our findings, and developed a working draft template for conducting a biological inventory. Adaptive Management Science Team Member, Clark County Multiple Species HCP, Clark County, Nevada. For Clark County Planning Department. 2004-2006. As a consultant to Clark County, I served on a team of scientists that includes representatives of the Biological Resources Research Center, University of Nevada, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Department of Agriculture. Functions of the team include monitoring science in the management of the HCP, review of proposals for funding (totaling $44 million in 2006), and evaluating scientific needs of the program. Multi-species Habitat Conservation Plan, City of Tucson, Arizona. For City of Tucson Planning Department. 2004-2005. As Senior Scientist of the consulting firm contracted to prepare the HCP for the City, I served the information needs of the Technical Advisory Team and Stakeholders’ Team, and advised the City Planning Department on the scientific information available concerning the species being considered for inclusion in the plan. I contributed to the preparation of documents and GIS coverages, conservation and mitigation strategies, and led field trips to sites of particular interest. Multi-species Habitat Conservation Plan, Pima County, Arizona. For Pima County (as a subcontractor to RECON Consultants and ESI, Inc.). 2000-2003. I collaborated with teams of scientists, planners, landscape architects, economists, and GIS experts in developing a multi- species HCP for Pima County, Arizona. I personally wrote or supervised writing of evaluations of status and available information for 78 species of concern, and detailed species accounts for 55 species. I participated in threats assessment, establishing vulnerable species goals, habitat data analysis, preserve design and management plan, habitat suitability modeling, a summary of information available on potentially problematic species, and an adaptive management plan. I assisted economists in developing an economic analysis of the plan and wrote sections of the economic analysis dealing with program costs. Multi-species Habitat Conservation Plan, Clark County, Nevada. For Budd-Falen Law Offices. 1997-2001. I served as scientific advisor for an attorney representing rural town boards in development of an interdisciplinary conservation planning process for 79 Covered Species, 103 Evaluation Species, and 51 Watch List Species in a county area of more than 5,000,000 acres. I represented the rural communities’ interests in meetings with representatives of 31
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 32 academia, government agencies, and advocacy groups. I participated in Biological Advisory Committee subgroups on GIS, mammals, reptiles and amphibians, and invertebrates. I participated as a contributor and reviewer in preparation of species accounts and threats assessments, and reviewed and commented on drafts of planning documents. I participated in development of the Adaptive Management Plan in meetings and workshops for scientists and land managers and reviewed the draft plan. The entire process contributed to development of an HCP that will conserve wildlife and plant species of concern and allow development and use of private and multiple use lands within one of the fastest growing counties in the nation. Lower Colorado River Multi-species Conservation Program. For Metropolitan Water District of Los Angeles. 1999. I wrote species accounts and species conservation goals for bats and invertebrates included as Covered and Evaluation Species in this HCP. I compiled existing scientific literature on species of concern, including threats assessment and conservation strategies, and I wrote accounts for bats and invertebrates. Habitat Management Plan for the Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly. For San Bernardino County. 1994. I developed a habitat management plan for the Delhi Sands Flower-loving Fly at a new County hospital site in Colton, California. This initiated study of the ecology of the fly and a plan for habitat restoration. I directed a 5-year study of the fly population that determined that the population was apparently not impacted by the construction of the hospital and the preserve design was effective. I produced a 10-minute videotape, which has been shown on CBS and NBC television. Habitat Conservation Plan. For Washington County, Utah. 1993. I participated in the preparation of a habitat conservation plan for desert tortoise and other special status species. I was involved in meetings of the Steering Committee and Technical Advisory Committee, manuscript review and preparation, and negotiations with agencies and individuals. Ecological Constraints and Opportunities Study. For City of Tucson. 2002. I evaluated lands owned or regulated by the City of Tucson for potential to have threatened and endangered species or to serve as mitigation for City actions that may affect such species. I wrote several reports and presented findings at meetings. This work laid the foundation for the development of a multiple species HCP for the City, and informed managers and public of specific concerns for wildlife on City owned and regulated lands. Paseo de las Iglesias Project. For U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Pima County (as a subcontractor to Tetra Tech, Inc and DMA, Inc.) 2001-2004. I participated in a major riparian restoration planning project. Beginning with conducting a survey of a 7-mile reach of the Santa Cruz River for wildlife habitat and species of concern, I mapped habitat conditions and locations of wildlife observations to form the foundation of a GIS database. I compiled lists of all plants and animals observed to be using the area, and wrote a Habitat Evaluation Process (HEP) analysis for alternative plans. I participated in a four-day workshop of planners and scientists developing a hydrogeomorphic (HGM) approach to wetland planning and an objective statistical foundation for evaluating conditions along Arizona rivers. I led field teams to measure variables at reference sites. Subsequently, I participated in development and analysis of plan alternatives and reference standards, using both HGM and HEP approaches, and wrote sections of the project EIS. Irvington Landfill End Use Master Plan. For The Acacia Group (contractors to the City of Tucson). 1999. I participated in the planning team designing a city park for the end use of a closed landfill. I conducted surveys for threatened and endangered species, compiled a list of all plant species occurring on the site, with special consideration for conditions unique to a closed 32
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 33 landfill and irrigation limitations and potential for use in landscaping. I developed a plant palette for landscape architects. I also advised the Interpretive Specialist who was planning interpretive materials, and contributed to writing a master plan booklet for the park. This project received a Professional Design Award in the Analysis and Planning Category from the Arizona Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Natural Resources Management Plan for Barry M. Goldwater Range. For U.S. Air Force. 1996. I wrote sections of a draft management plan for 1,842,423-acre aerial training range involving multiple issues and agencies. I compiled and reviewed all available relevant documents and wrote an information synthesis report. Environmental Assessment for Water Exchange Agreement. For ASARCO and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. 1998. I compiled and reviewed historical literature and drafted sections of Environmental Assessment on area history and Biological Evaluation of water exchange agreement between mining company and Native American community. Great Salt Lake Shorebird Preserve. For Kennecott Utah Copper Company. 1993. I evaluated a proposed 2,800-acre shorebird and wildlife preserve adjacent to the Great Salt Lake. I advised on potential management and design options as part of mitigation program component of Section 404 (Clean Water Act) compliance. Wildlife Preserve and Management Plan. For The Wickenburg Inn Tennis and Guest Ranch. 1972-1973. I conducted a survey of plants and animals on a 4,700-acre parcel surrounding a proposed resort development. Using data from the survey, I designed a wildlife preserve on that land, including horseback and foot interpretive trails, wildlife waters, and viewing opportunities, and a management plan to enhance wildlife populations. I participated in the design team for the ranch, and served as an environmental monitor during construction. 33
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 34 Santa Cruz River, Arizona: Ecological Conditions and Potential Restoration Opportunities The Santa Cruz River is a major drainage in southern Arizona, beginning in a high-desert grassland, dipping south into Mexico, then arching back northward through the urban areas of Nogales and the Tucson region to meet the Gila River south of Phoenix. Over a period of more than two decades, I was involved in several projects that studied the ecological conditions and developed plans for restoration of natural resources along the Santa Cruz. The Santa Cruz River once had permanently wet reaches that were important centers for the development of Native American civilizations, European and American settlement, and some of the best wildlife habitat in Arizona. The wet river disappeared as a result of several modern human actions, and the wildlife habitat has been radically altered. Much of the prehistoric and historic resource has become orchards, housing developments, urban landscape, or landfills. Previously dry reaches are now perennially flowing with effluent from municipal sewage treatment plants, and new riparian communities are developing. I began studying the Santa Cruz during the research for my doctoral dissertation: Bionomics and Management of Pest Mosquitoes at the Agro-urban Interface, Santa Cruz Valley, Arizona. The world’s largest irrigated pecan orchard is located adjacent to one of the largest retirement communities: Green Valley, Arizona. Flood irrigation of the pecans produced huge numbers of mosquitoes (Aedes vexans and Psorophora columbiae) that invaded the retirement community and engendered complaints to the local health department. I developed an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program based on use of bacteria toxic to mosquitoes and water management that could be applied inexpensively by farm laborers. That program caused a drop to less than one bite per person per day for farm workers, an end of complaints, and happy farmers and residents. The farmers asked me to develop an IPM program for their only significant pests, pecan aphids, and I spent two years working on this problem. My approach was to cultivate a more natural environment that would nurture predators and parasites of aphids, and that approach worked. In the process of studying the pecan orchard, I discovered that most of the same species of birds that were normally found in native cottonwood-willow riparian habitats were also present in the orchard. I also studied the other biological and social repercussions of the farm. 34
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 35 I presented my findings at several national and international symposia and professional society meetings, and published papers: Mosquito Problems at the Agro-urban Interface, Santa Cruz Valley, Arizona. Arizona- Nevada Academy of Science. Tucson, AZ. 1984. Pecan Farming: Repercussions of the Creation of a "Georgia Swamp" in the Sonoran Desert. Invited paper. Symposium on Interactions Among Plants and Animals in the Western Deserts. American Association for the Advancement of Science, Tucson, AZ. 1985. The Pecan Orchard as a Riparian Ecosystem. Interagency North American Conference on Riparian Ecosystems and their Management. Tucson, AZ. 1985. Large-scale Application of B.t.i. for Management of Floodwater Mosquitoes in Irrigated Pecan Orchards. American Mosquito Control Association, New Orleans, LA. 1986. Practical Applications of Biological Control for Pecan Aphids. California Pecan Growers Assoc. Visalia, CA. 1987. K.J. Kingsley. 1985. The Pecan Orchard as a Riparian Ecosystem. Pp. 245-249. In: R.R. Johnson, C.D. Ziebell, D.R. Patton, P.F. Folliott, and R.H. Hamre (Tech. Coords.). Riparian Ecosystems and their Management: Reconciling Conflicting Uses (First North American Riparian Conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-120). Ft. Collins, CO: USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. 523 pp. K.J. Kingsley. 1987. Arizona Aphid Population Trend, Present Situation, and Results of Insecticide Applications. Proceedings of the Western Pecan Conference. 21: 68-75. K.J. Kingsley. 1989. Biological and Social Repercussions of Irrigated Pecan Agriculture in Southern Arizona. pp. 131-150. In J.O. Schmidt (Ed.) Special Biotic Relationships in the Arid Southwest. University of New Mexico Press. 152 pp. 35
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 36 The portions of the Santa Cruz River that are wet today are those that receive treated sewage effluent from Nogales and Tucson. These reaches have developed riparian habitat, primarily cottonwood-willow and salt cedar. In 1999 and 2000, I was the Principal Investigator on a project for the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation to determine the species richness and relative species abundance of bird species along an effluent-dominated stretch of the Santa Cruz River downstream from Tucson. I conducted transect surveys along five one-half mile long study reaches three times in each of four seasons. A total of 133 bird species was found to use the area. I prepared a report that detailed findings and related them to vegetation and water conditions. I presented a poster at a planning conference, and an oral presentation to the annual meeting of the Arizona Riparian Council. Birds of the Effluent-dominated Lower Santa Cruz River. Arizona Riparian Council. Tucson, Arizona. May 14, 2001. With Thomas E. Furgason. Avian Surveys of the Lower Santa Cruz River. Poster Presentation. Symposium for Planning for the Santa Cruz River. Tucson, Arizona. March 30, 2001. With Thomas Furgason, Mike List, Lara Mitchell, and Elizabeth Vinson. I continued to investigate this area as a volunteer, on a less formal basis, and presented talks at several meetings. What Happens If You Just Add Water II? Paper presented at Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean Archipelago II: Connecting Mountain Islands and Desert Seas, 5th Conference on Research and Resource Management in Southwestern Deserts. May 11-15, 2004 What Happens If You Just Add Water? Paper presented at Restoring Streams, Riparian Areas, Floodplains: Tailoring Restoration to Community Needs and Scientific Contexts, Inventory and Monitoring. 2nd Southwest Training Workshop and Symposium. The Association of State Wetland Managers, Inc. Socorro, New Mexico. November 16-19, 2003. I began involvement in restoration planning projects in 2001, and this work continued in various forms through 2006. During this phase, I served several different clients, including planning consultants and government agencies. My primary role was as the recognized local expert on the ecology of the river. I surveyed for wildlife habitat and species of concern, field mapped habitat conditions and locations of wildlife observations to form the basis of a GIS database, compiled lists of all plants and animals currently using the area, and prepared a Biological Resources Report for submission to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. I worked with planners in the development of plan alternatives and evaluation their potential effects. I participated in an extended process of developing a hydrogeomorphic (HGM) approach to wetland planning and evaluation for stream restoration in Arizona, and the application of the HGM approach to analysis of baseline data and projected future outcomes of restoration alternatives. I led field teams to measure variables at reference sites and in targeted restoration areas. Work products included components of the EIS for the project, and a Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) analysis of baseline conditions and selected alternatives. Subsequently, I served as advisor to the Pima County Flood Control District, conducting document reviews and analysis of plans, participating in public and sponsors planning meetings, preparation of exhibits, and evaluation of biological repercussions of plan alternatives. I also conducted a baseline survey for mosquitoes and West Nile Virus along this segment of the river and served as advisor to the Flood Control District project managers. The construction phases of the restoration projects have not yet been initiated. 36
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 37 People have lived along the Santa Cruz River for thousands of years, and some of the oldest known artifacts of humans in the new world have been uncovered in what is today the City of Tucson, which is one of the oldest continuously occupied urban areas in the New World. I participated in an interdisciplinary study and planning team for the Tucson Origins Cultural Park. The team included paleontologists, archaeologists, ecologists, historians, landscape architects, agriculturalists, architects, and urban planners. We produced a baseline document and planning concept that has been widely regarded as an outstanding contribution to the field. I also conducted a status survey for a mouse, Merriam’s Mouse (Peromycus merriami) that was once found to have been abundant along the Santa Cruz River, but was thought to have become extinct or endangered because it had not been found in over 20 years. The study involved examination of specimens and field notes of collectors, review of data on specimens in museums, evaluation of existing habitat potential at the sites where the species has been historically found, selection of potential locations for further study, and live-trapping at 19 selected sites to determine whether the species is still present. Samples were collected for DNA analysis. I found that this species is widespread and not rare, is found in a variety of mesquite-dominated habitats, and is still present at or near locations where it was historically found throughout its geographic range. However, it is extremely difficult to identify, and very few people have the expertise to identify it positively. The Santa Cruz River has been an important part of my life for the past 25 years, as it was for people who lived along it for the past several thousand years. With sound science and creative planning, some of the values of the river may be restored or developed as community assets. 37
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 38 INTERPRETATION, TEACHING EXPERIENCE, and VISITOR SERVICES Zion National Park, Springdale, Utah. I served as a volunteer front country interpretive ranger in the summer of 2009. I staffed the Visitor Center, greeting and providing information and directions for several hundred visitors each day. I roved the trails in uniform, answering visitor questions and picking up litter. I also collaborated with the Interpretive Supervisor in preparing a digital database of photographs to be used by the Interpretive Rangers for their programs. I reviewed some 4,000 photos and annotated each in the database. I also taught three workshops for the Zion Canyon Field Institute, led monthly all-day birding adventures, and contributed photographs that were used in promotional materials. Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. In 2008 and 2009, I served as a guide for the annual Wildflower Festival. I participated in training, then subsequently led hikes for visitors and roved trails to answer questions about the wildflowers. Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, Las Vegas, Nevada. I served as a volunteer backcountry ranger in the summer of 2007. I hiked trails, talked with visitors, provided information and first aid, performed minor trail maintenance and litter control, and reported areas that needed additional maintenance. I counted visitors, horses, dogs, and bikes, and serviced electronic trail monitoring devices. I was awarded the Volunteer of the Year award by Get Outdoors Nevada, an interagency volunteer program. Sonoita Creek State Natural Area/Patagonia Lake State Park, Arizona. With my wife, Amy Gaiennie, I served as a volunteer natural history interpreter at this park for six months over two years, 20 or more hours per week. We gave evening programs of PowerPoint presentations (A Walk on the Wild Side and Sonoita Creek State Natural Area – What Lives Here and Why?) based on our own photographs and story lines, staffed the visitor center, drove and interpreted pontoon boat tours of the lake, served as backcountry rangers, conducted the Junior Ranger program, and led bird walks for visitors. This park is famous as a place for birders to visit to find some of the Southeastern Arizona specialty birds, such as the Elegant Trogon and Black-capped Gnatcatcher. It includes a 260-acre lake, seven miles of stream and riparian corridor, and approximately 9,000 acres of upland with over 20 miles of hiking trails. The visitor center generally has between 100 and 200 visitors per day, most of them seeking assistance with hike planning, rare bird locations, or park orientation. During this period of service, I received training in the Certified Interpretive Host program of the National Association for Interpretation, as well as power boat operation, first aid and CPR, visitor center operation, and trail safety. I was awarded a 1,000 hour Volunteer Service Award by Arizona State Parks. We prepared and delivered a talk at the annual conference of the Natural Areas Association, in collaboration with the Arizona State Parks Natural Resources Ecologist (Research, Inventory, and Monitoring Volunteers in Arizona State Parks). 38
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 39 SWCA, Inc. Environmental Consultants. During the 15 years I worked as Senior Scientist, I was responsible for mentoring junior scientists, providing information and support on a wide variety of issues and species of concern, reviewing manuscripts, and conducting specific training experiences. For the most part, this was one-on-one training of highly motivated professionals, or working with small groups to facilitate team efforts, usually in the field. Saguaro National Park. For three years, I served as a volunteer leader of monthly nocturnal nature hikes. For many of the participants, this was the first experience of the desert at night. I also led a spring wildflower hike, and participated in special events, including set-up and take- down and guiding visitors. Shackleton School. For five years, I served as a guest educator, leading students from a private alternative high school in Massachusetts on backpacking trips in the Superstition and Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. CLE International. I served as an invited lecturer in Continuing Legal Education conferences on the Endangered Species Act in 2000, 1999, 1997, 1994. I presented lectures for audiences of lawyers, agency personnel, consultants and the regulated community on aspects of the Endangered Species Act. Audubon Expedition Institute. For three years, I served as an Adjunct Faculty member. I taught field courses in Systematic Investigation of Local Flora and Fauna for graduate students in environmental education. Students and I camped on a study area, and explored the plants and animals present there. I presented lectures, discussions, and field experiences on identification methods, mapping techniques, statistical analysis of data, measurement of environmental variables, and presentation of findings. Prescott College. As an Adjunct Faculty member, I mentored individual students studying biological science subjects, photography and illustration, and computer skills. I taught field courses on ecology and natural history, including identification skills and field sampling and measurement methods. . University Of Nevada, Las Vegas. While working on my M.S. degree, I worked for two years as a Graduate Teaching Assistant. I taught laboratory sessions in Human Anatomy and Physiology, Introductory Biology, Vertebrate Zoology, and Ecology classes for majors and non- majors. The Wickenburg Inn. I served as full-time resident naturalist at guest ranch in Arizona for six years. I created a program of natural history interpretation for guests, including a museum with living and preserved exhibits with multilingual labels. I presented nature walks, slide shows, and tours of historical sites and National Parks. I developed and presented programs for children and adults representing an international clientele. I wrote a weekly natural history column for the local newspaper, which was sent to all ranch guests for a year following their visits. I also led horseback, vehicular, and pedestrian tours. In addition, I served the ranch as an Emergency Medical Technician and safety advisor, and drove the hay ride wagon to cookouts. I published a peer-reviewed article on this program: Dude Ranch Naturalists. The Interpreter (Association of Interpretive Naturalists Journal). 1982. 39
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 40 Additional Training related to Visitor Services Wilderness First Responder training. Wilderness Medical Associates. Nov. 2007. Backcountry Ranger Training. Spring Mountains National Recreation Area. July 18, 2007. Certified Interpretive Host Training. Arizona State Parks. December 7-8, 2006. CardioPulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Automated Electronic Defibrillator (AED). Arizona State Parks. November30, 2006. Wilderness First Aid, Basic. American Red Cross. June 2005. Boating Skills and Seamanship. U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. January-March 2004. Boating Safety. Arizona Game and Fish Department, August 23, 2003. Yellowstone’s Charismatic Microbiota. The Yellowstone Association Institute, Yellowstone National Park. Two-day workshop on extremophile microbiology. Dr. David Ward, University of Montana. Graduate course work in administration, management, policy, and counseling (51 credits). Arizona State University School of Social Work. 1987-1989. Emergency Medical Technician Training, Phoenix College, 1976. MUSEUM AND CURATORIAL EXPERIENCE Natural History Museum, Zion National Park. 2009. I worked two days a week as a GS-7 Museum Technician for the summer of 2009. My primary task was to identify and catalog a collection of 2,479 insects that were obtained incidental to a major study of bees conducted by the USDA Bee Research Laboratory in 2006 and 2007. Insects that were not bees were separated from the bees, pinned, rough-sorted, and packed in storage boxes. I identified them to family, with many to genus or species, and cataloged them using the National Park Service database cataloging system Re:Discovery for the NPS (ANCS+). I also trained and supervised another volunteer to work with the mammal and bird collections, including examining specimens for pest infestation, treatment of infested specimens, preparation of updated labels, and updating information in the electronic catalog. Natural History Museum, Zion National Park. 2008. Natural History Museum Inventory and Move. I conducted an inventory, packed, and moved several thousand natural history specimens of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Most of the specimens were collected as vouchers more than 70 years ago to document the species present in the Park. I examined each specimen to evaluate condition, checked names and spelling in the catalog and specimens, packed for freezing to kill any museum pests and moving to the new museum, unpacked the specimens and 40
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 41 arranged them in their new home, relabeled those that had had name changes, and changed the fluid in all fluid preserved specimens. Archaeology Research Collection, SWCA Environmental Consultants. SWCA is a consulting firm specializing in cultural and natural resource investigations. The cultural resources branch incorporates a collection of thousands of archeological artifacts on temporary status while being held for analysis and final disposition. During the years I spent with SWCA, the Tucson office moved three times. As part of the moving team, I assisted by transporting and keeping track of artifacts ranging from feathers to matates. Each time, the entire office and lab was moved over a single weekend, with no need to close during regular business hours and no loss of or damage to artifacts. Invertebrates of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. For U.S. National Park Service. 1987-1990. I conducted a 3-year study on the ecology of invertebrates as part of a multidisciplinary 14-project Sensitive Ecosystems Program. I collected and curated more than 4,200 specimens, and developed a dBase-III+ database on over 5,000 specimens and observations. Mammals of the Grapevine Mountains, Death Valley National Monument. For my M.S. thesis, I conducted a classic-style mammal survey of the Grapevine Mountains. I collected and prepared 413 specimens as skins and/or skeletons and deposited them, along with a full set of notes, in the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley. Insect Museum, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. As a graduate research and teaching assistant, I curated the entomology collection. Most of this work was integrating specimens collected by students into the collection. This required remounting, identification, relabeling, recording data, and positioning in the collection. I also changed fluids on fluid-preserved specimens, and fumigated the dried collection. I updated and maintained the specimen data file and prepared a hands-on teaching collection. Natural History Museum, The Wickenburg Inn, Wickenburg, Arizona. As naturalist for this resort, I designed and built a small museum for guests. This included building furniture, such as display cases for living and preserved specimens, bookshelves, work tables, and cabinets. On display were a working and teaching herbarium of several hundred plant specimens, rotating displays of plants in bloom, live small animals including snakes, preserved specimens of insects, skulls, and curiosities, a lending library, and photographs. All exhibits were labeled in English, Spanish, German, and French because the clientele was international. Prescott College, Prescott, Arizona. As a research and teaching assistant, I worked in the ornithology lab and the herbarium. I collected and prepared specimens of birds, including skins, feathers, and skeletons. I performed the initial sort to taxonomic Class of faunal remains from a major archaeological and paleontological excavation at Stanton’s Cave in the Grand Canyon, which included over 100,000 bones. I identified bird bones from that excavation to species, and labeled and documented them. I recorded data on, packaged, and prepared chain-of-custody forms for the specimens of other taxonomic Classes. I also curated the herbarium, which involved identifying and mounting specimens and integrating student collections into the research collection. 41
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 42 VOLUNTEER SERVICE In 2009, I published an article on my volunteer experience: K.J. Kingsley and A.J. Gaiennie. 2009. How to Get Good Help Cheap—Retired Professionals as Volunteers in Wildlife Programs. The Wildlife Professional Summer 2009. Pp 62-64. U.S. NATIONAL PARK SERVICE Zion National Park. April-October 2009. Approximately 16 hours per week. I served as a volunteer front country interpretive ranger. I staffed the Visitor Center, roved the trails, and collaborated with the Interpretive Supervisor in preparing a digital database of photographs to be used by the Interpretive Rangers for their programs. I reviewed some 4,000 photos and annotated each in the database. I also assisted in various ways at special occasions during the Park’s Centennial Celebration events. January-October 2008. Approximately 30 hours per week. During the nine months I was a resident of Zion National Park, I participated in a variety of volunteer projects including: o Information Technology Inventory. I conducted an inventory of all of the IT equipment owned by the Park, which included more than 300 items in seven buildings. o Peregrine Falcon Survey. I surveyed the Park daily during the winter season for returning Peregrine Falcons. o Natural History Museum Inventory and Move. I conducted an inventory, packed, and moved several thousand natural history specimens of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. Most of the specimens were collected as vouchers more than 70 years ago to document the species present in the Park. I examined each specimen to evaluate condition, checked names and spelling in the catalog and specimens, packed for freezing to kill any museum pests and moving to the new museum, unpacked the specimens and arranged them in their new home. o Common, Conspicuous, and Curious Arthropods of Zion National Park. 2008. As a volunteer, I reviewed the catalog of specimens and existing literature, conducted field surveys, compiled photographs from the field and internet, and wrote a book and intranet resource on the the insects and other arthropods of the park for the interpretive staff. o Bighorn Sheep Survey. o Roving Interpreter. Cedar Breaks National Monument. July 2008 and July 2009. Approximately 30 hours each year. I trained for and led wildflower walks for visitors during the Third Annual Wildflower Festival. Saguaro National Park. 2001-2005. I led monthly night-time nature walks for visitors, participated in a variety of special events, and led a wildflower walk. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument. 42
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 43 Arthropod Fauna of Quitobaquito Springs Management Area. 1983-1984. As a volunteer while in graduate school, I conducted a two-year survey of the arthropod fauna of a desert oasis using a variety of techniques for terrestrial and aquatic species. Published Technical Report (K.J. Kingsley, R.A. Bailowitz and R.L. Smith. 1987. A Preliminary Investigation of the Arthropod Fauna of Quitobaquito Springs Area, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona. National Park Service/University of Arizona Tech. Rep. No. 23 CPSU Contrib. 057/01. Tucson, Arizona 26 pp.) Grand Canyon National Park Aquatic Fauna of Minor Tributaries of the Colorado River. 1982-1986. I conducted an investigation of ecology of invertebrates and vertebrates in rock pools and small streams along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon National Park. This study required participating in multi- disciplinary research river trips for 21 days each year, and investigating biota of aquatic ecosystems of several dozen side canyons that included springs, interrupted streams, and rock basins. The study was conducted over a range of rainfall years, from extreme drought to severe flooding, and contrasted the effects on fauna of the different aquatic systems and rainfall amounts. U.S. FOREST SERVICE Spring Mountains National Recreation Area, Nevada. May-September 2007. Volunteer Natural Resources Scientist and Backcountry Ranger. Approximately 30 hours per week. o Springsnail Status Monitoring. Springsnails of the genus Pyrgulopsis include many highly endemic species, often limited in distribution to only one or a handful of springs. They are minute, cryptic, often difficult to access, and poorly known. Two species of springsnails (P. deaconi and P. turbatrix) have been documented as occurring at several springs that are under management jurisdiction of the U.S. Forest Service in the Spring Mountains National Recreation Area. The Forest Service was committed to periodic monitoring of these populations at five springs, but had not been able to do so since 1998 because of a lack of trained personnel. I visited each of the springs and documented the presence of snails and current conditions in a detailed report that will serve as a basis for further periodic monitoring. o Butterfly Habitat Assessment. I conducted habitat assessments for special-status butterflies along portions of a planned new multi-use trail, identifying, mapping, and counting known food plants of the butterflies. The purpose of this study was to mitigate potential impacts to butterfly habitat. This assessment was conducted during a severe drought year, and few of the butterfly host plants, and none of the butterflies were found. I submitted a written report (Butterfly Habitat Assessment for the Blue Tree Trail, Catch Pen And Rocky Gorge Segments Realignments) and PowerPoint presentation. o Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly Surveys. I conducted surveys for the Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly (Icaricia shasta charlestonensis), a taxon that has been petitioned for listing as an endangered species, for the purpose of developing a better understanding of the distribution and ecology of this species. By hiking repeatedly to the highest elevations in the Spring Mountains and searching for butterflies and host plants, I documented distribution of Mount Charleston Blue butterflies and potential habitat for them that greatly exceeded the 43
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 44 previously known range. I documented presence and general distribution of six species of plants in the Spring Mountains that are known to be food plants for the butterfly species elsewhere in its range. I prepared a report that included findings and suggestions for future efforts (Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly (Icaricia shasta charlestonensis): Observations and Speculations – 2007). In addition, I prepared a teaching collection of butterflies for training Forest Service personnel. For this and his other volunteer work, I received the Volunteer of the Year award by Get Outdoors Nevada, an interagency volunteer network. o Backcountry Ranger. I served as a volunteer backcountry ranger in the summer of 2007. I hiked trails, talked with visitors, provided information and first aid, performed minor trail maintenance and litter control, and reported areas that needed additional maintenance. I counted visitors, horses, dogs, and bikes, and serviced electronic trail monitoring devices. ARIZONA STATE PARKS Sonoita Creek State Natural Area/Patagonia Lake State Park, Arizona. 2005, 2006, and 2007 and Verde River Greenway/Dead Horse Ranch State Park. 2006 and 2009. Research, Inventory, and Monitoring. With my wife, Amy Gaiennie, I collaborated on surveys for special status species and studies of ecological conditions. These included: o Rockin’ River Ranch, Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. We investigated a 209-acre property that was added to the Greenway in 2008. We wrote a Biological Evaluation, a Draft Management Plan, and a report on photopoints that we established for subsequent monitoring. We prepared and presented a PowerPoint program on our findings. o Important Bird Area Monitoring Surveys. I conducted transect and point count surveys following IBA protocols of birds in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. I wrote reports on my findings. o Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Surveys. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocol for this endangered species in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. I wrote reports on my findings. o Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo Surveys. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved protocol for this species in Sonoita Creek State Natural Area and Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. I wrote reports on my findings and delivered a presentation at a regional meeting of The Wildlife Society. o National Marsh Bird Surveys. 2006. I conducted call playback surveys following the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service approved protocol for marsh birds in the Verde River Greenway State Natural Area, including Tavasci Marsh, and submitted a report on my findings. o Distribution of Vascular Plant Species and Current Conditions of the Vegetation Community – 2006, Verde River Greenway State Natural Area. I examined 199 points within a state park area that included natural riparian and upland areas as well as developed recreational facilities. At each point, I recorded GPS coordinates (UTM), identified all identifiable plant species within a 10-meter radius circle, and took photographs in each cardinal direction. I compiled the data into a spreadsheet, used it to document occurrence and associations for 150 taxa of vascular plants. I wrote a report 44
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 45 documenting findings and produced maps of the distributions of species of special concern. o Vegetation Surveys of Sonoita Creek State Natural Area. 2005. I conducted a study to evaluate riparian vegetation to assess the current conditions and health of the riparian vegetation with regard to reproduction, survival, and growth of trees. At each of 11 points along the creek, I sampled three transects that crossed the creek and extended to the end of the riparian community. I measured canopy and ground cover, identified trees to species and measured their heights and diameters for at least 50 trees per site, identified all identifiable plants to species and ranked each as to cover and/or abundance, and took photographs in each cardinal direction. I wrote a report on these findings. Natural History Interpreter. Sonoita Creek State Natural Area. With my wife, Amy Gaiennie, I served as a volunteer natural history interpreter at this park for six months over two years, 20 or more hours per week. We gave evening programs of PowerPoint presentations based on our own photographs and story lines, staffed the visitor center, drove and interpreted pontoon boat tours of the lake, served as backcountry rangers, conducted the Junior Ranger program, and led bird walks for visitors. I received training in the Certified Interpretive Host program of the National Association for Interpretation, as well as power boat operation, first aid and CPR, visitor center operation, and trail safety. I was awarded a 1,000 hour Volunteer Service Award by Arizona State Parks. PIMA COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION AND FLOOD CONTROL DISTRICT In 2004, I conducted a year-long survey of birds of Cienega Creek County Preserve, based on monthly transect surveys. This led to the preserve being nominated as an Important Bird Area under the National Audubon Society’s program. I wrote a report on my findings and submitted it to Pima County Flood Control District, managers of the Preserve. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES DIVISION Winter Sparrow Banding in Southeastern Arizona Grasslands, with Dr. Janet Ruth, U.S. Geological Survey. 2004-2005. I assisted with the capture and banding of birds. ARIZONA GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT o Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas. Over a period of four years, I conducted breeding bird surveys on two blocks designated as part of a statewide effort to record the breeding birds of Arizona. One block included the Empire-Cienega National Natural Resources Conservation Area, the second was in the Coronado National Forest. Both included upland and riparian areas. o Aravaipa Creek Fish Survey. 2002-2005. As a perennial volunteer over four years, I participated in twice-yearly three-day seining and electrofishing surveys of seven species of native fish in Aravaipa Creek. I collaborated as a team member with personnel of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, Arizona Game and Fish Department, University of Arizona, Arizona State University and The Nature Conservancy. In the final year, I also provided catering service for the team of 20, cooking Dutch oven campfire dinners. 45
  • Curriculum Vitae of Kenneth J. Kingsley, page 46 o O’Donnell Creek Fish Restoration. For The Nature Conservancy and Arizona Game and Fish Department. 2003. As a volunteer, I participated in renovation of a creek to remove non-native fish and restore native fish. I led a team of volunteers, operated a backpack fish shocker and directed the capture and processing of fish. NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT For six successive years, I conducted surveys of wintering birds in the Atascosa Highlands circle within the Coronado National Forest, southeastern Arizona. HUMANE SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA I worked in various volunteer capacities including: o Animal Rescue Training: I participated in a three-day training program for animal rescue in disasters. This was provided by the organization Noah’s Wish, and including animal handling techniques for species ranging from chickens and rabbits to horses and cattle, how to set up and manage an animal shelter during a natural disaster, and safety considerations. o Animal First Aid: I received training in animal first aid, including CPR, restraint of injured animals, basic life support, and transportation of injured animals. o Special Events: I assisted with set-up and take-down of several special events, staffed information booths, directed traffic, and served as a puppeteer. SAINT FRANCIS IN THE FOOTHILLS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, TUCSON I served in a variety of volunteer projects as an active member of the church, such as directing traffic and parking cars on Sundays, litter control, set up and take down for events. I also served for three years on the Staff-Parish Relations Committee (human resources committee), one as chairperson, and two years on the Board of Trustees. 46