Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Pelatihan Conflict & Stress Management in the Workplace (Kanaidi, SE., M.Si., cSAP)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Pelatihan Conflict & Stress Management in the Workplace (Kanaidi, SE., M.Si., cSAP)

400
views

Published on

Published in: Business, Real Estate

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
400
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Presenter Notes:

    Use this slide to introduce the learning activity and cue participants to open their Taking Care of Ourselves booklet to Page 1.

    Activity 1: Knowing Your Stressors and the Signs of Stress
    Divide caregivers into pairs or small groups to discuss the following questions:
    1) What are my sources of stress?
    2) How do I know when I’m experiencing stress?
    3) What are my stress reactions?
    Have each caregiver record their personal responses on page one of their booklet. After five minutes, have each pair or small group report back to the larger group.
    Summarize responses from the group, highlighting common sources of parent/provider stress, and common symptoms of stress.
     
    Refer to:
    Taking Care of Ourselves Parent/Provider Booklet
    Poster – The Basics
  • Presenter Notes:

    Point out that this diagram illustrates the Thought-Behavior-Emotion Cycle. It shows how your thoughts or your thinking can impact your behavior.

    Review the cycle illustration and the example on the slide. Add other examples as needed.

    Emphasize that because it is a cycle, breaking the cycle can happen at any point. That is, stopping the All or Nothing way of thinking or Thought avoids the Mood/Emotion of feeling worthless, avoids the Behavior, and hopefully, avoids this cycle becoming a “regular” cycle – or a habitual way of perceiving, thinking , feeling, and behaving. Thought Stopping is one strategy that helps to interrupt this kind of cycle and will be discussed during the next part of the training.



    Refer to:
    Poster - Thoughts Impact Behavior




  • Presenter Notes:

    Remind participants that they are in control of their thoughts and reactions.

    Emphasize that it is possible to change our habits and reduce our personal stress by first, recognizing what is in our control and what is out of our control. Then, we can consciously shift and focus our attention and energy on what is in our control and let go of what is out or our control.

    Review the examples on this slide.

    As time allows, invite participants to share a personal example of feeling stressed and reducing stress by recognizing what was in or out of their control.



    Refer to:
    Poster: The Ball is in Your Court
  • Presenter Notes:

    Use this slide to summarize content of the previous slides and transition to thinking about and identifying strategies to manage stress.
  • Presenter Notes:

    Point out that this slide lists strategies that can be done every day, any where.

    Review a few of the strategies on the slide.

    Emphasize that they seem simple and obvious but we tend to forget to do these things- when we do, our resources for coping can run low or get to empty. Think of these strategies like a “shot” from the doctor or a “tank of emotional fuel” - they can fight off the impact of more problematic stress and keep you going strong and less stressed.






    Refer to:
    Poster: A Strategy a Day Will Keep the Doctor Away! (I and II)
  • Presenter Notes:

    Describe Active Listening as stated on this slide

    Acknowledge that most of us think of ourselves as good listeners. At the same time, most of us feel, at one time or another, that we are not listened to or heard. And, anyone in the room can give an example of miscommunication and the stress that comes with it.

    Effective communication, such as active listening is not automatic, it takes focused attention and effort. It is an important strategy to reduce the stress of interaction that leave us feeling misunderstood, disrespected, and uncomfortable with others.

    Review the example.

    As time allows, invite participants to share a personal example of using active listening or how feeling heard helps to improve relationships and reduce stress.


    Refer to:
    Poster: Are You Really Listening
    Effective Communication Strategies

  • Transcript

    • 1. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Psychology & Principles of Change CONFLICT & STRESS MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE Training Bandung, 21 - 23 Juni 2010 By : Kanaidi, SE., M.Si kana_ati@yahoo.com
    • 2. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style PSYCHOLOGY OF CHANGE
    • 3. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleA Soccer Match Without Rules
    • 4. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style
    • 5. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Perubahan Adalah Masalah mind set..
    • 6. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style WORKING ON THE GAP FUTUREPRESENT PAST “GAP” better harmfull The DELTA GAP’s Theory of CHANGE Ikaputra et.al, Unistaff summer school Unisattt Training, 2005 upper lower
    • 7. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title stylePsychology of Change  We experience changes physically, mentally and emotionally  Usually it is subtle and slow but it can be sudden – disrupting our work, dislocating our relationships or ruining our leisure time.  Sometimes we can discern a pattern, sometimes not  Sometimes we can explain it, sometimes not  Changes involves the familiar; sometimes the unknown. Many of us prefer what is familiar  Rather than seek change, we continue to live with our old familiar feelings (patterns and routines)
    • 8. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Likely reactions from the individual facing with change Announcement implementati on Schock Anger Acceptance TestingConfusion Denial Cooperation Adopt changes Enthousiasm/ Deception Evaluate impact Announcement Acceptance Psychology of Change
    • 9. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style PRO-ACTIVE RESISTORS DEFENSIVE RESISTORS BYSTANDERS CHANGE AGENTS CHANGE AGENTS IN WAITING Actively Against Neutral Strongly Supportive Yes No Have necessary attitude and skills for proposed change Commitment to Proposed Change Likely Reaction (OF GROUPS OF PEOPLE) TO CHANGE Psychology of Change
    • 10. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style THE CONTENTMENT ROOM THE DENIAL ROOM THE CONFUSION ROOM THE RENEWAL ROOM DUNGEON OF DENIAL PARALYSIS PIT WRONG DIRECTION DOOR THE SUN LOUNGE THE CHANGE HOUSE Likely Phases in an Organsation Under Change Psychology of Change
    • 11. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style CHANGE HOUSE : ROOM OF DENIAL Say Act “It’s nothing to do with us” “It won’t happen here” “Nobody else can do what we do” “If it isn’t broke don’t fix it” Defend the past Justify the present Blame everybody else Miss the message Psychology of Change
    • 12. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style CHANGE HOUSE : ROOM OF CONFUSION Say Act “We can’t do anything, it’s all been decided” “I’m looking for another job” “The management don’t care, they’ll just move on” “What can we do?” Frustration Withdrawal Blaming management No sense of direction Psychology of Change
    • 13. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style CHANGE HOUSE : ROOM OF RENEWAL Say Act “We have to keep improving - work smarter not harder” “We’re all part of the same team” “Yes, we can do it” Understand and work to targets Accept responsibility Know what we are trying to achieve Seek continuous improvement Psychology of Change
    • 14. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style • Economic theory of change: competition, markets and innovation • Psychological theory of change: fullfilment of individual needs • Sociological theory of change: powerful groups • Cultural theory of change: values, myths, beliefs • Biology theory of change: survival of the species / planet • System theory of change: crisis necessitates change • Political theory of change: opportunities for new politics Psychology of Change WHY CHANGE?: Theories of change
    • 15. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Tim e for a Change Revised budgeting Institutional reform New Regulations Economics Growth/Decline Competition / Competing programs New Technology Changing Values / Needs Acts of Nature/God New Leadership Personal fate/ health DRIVERS TO CHANGE
    • 16. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style DRIVERS TO CHANGE IN THE MOBILITY COVENANT CASE IN FLANDERS • New minister • Competing political program from Green Party • Changing values and needs re sustainable mobility • Personal health : high number of fatalities in road accidents • Cooperation and partnerships • Institutional reform
    • 17. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style DRIVERS TO CHANGE IN THE KOSOVO CASE • Post war recovery • Economic development • Status for Kosovo • Self -government • European Vocation
    • 18. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Lead and com m unicate change Evaluate, consolidate and institutionaliz e new approaches Produce more change Ensure Resources for short term projects and wins Implement new instruments and demonstrative projects Leadership and Coalition of Partners Create a Sense of Urgency for change Empower staff and stakeholders to act on the vision Create a Vision and Strategy TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE
    • 19. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE IN THE MOBILITY COVENANT CASE IN FLANDERS • New regulation and procedures: the mobility covenant • Ensured resources for demonstrative projects • Continued committed leadership and strong coalition of partners • Taskforce to steer and evaluate progress • Consolidation and institutionalisation of system • Affected new programs
    • 20. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE IN THE KOSOVO CASE • European Partnership Action Plan • Priority Actions • Capacity Building projects • Additional Resources • Monitoring Progress
    • 21. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleTRIGGERS FOR CHANGE – Trigger 1: Create a common sense of urgency • Identify and discuss anticipation to potential crises or looming crises, or major opportunities for change on objective and on emotional grounds • Examine market and competitive realities • Formulate the “why to change” • Refer to leading and peer scientific research / models / best practice
    • 22. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style – Trigger 2: Form a Powerful Leadership & Coalition of Partners • Assemble a group with enough and potential power to lead the change effort • Encourage the group to work together as a team • Seek strategic partners outside your organisation TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE
    • 23. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style – Trigger 3: Create a Vision and Strategy • Create a vision to help direct the change effort • Develop strategies for achieving that vision • Define demonstrative actions TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE
    • 24. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style – Trigger 4 : Empower staff and stakeholders to act on the Vision • Change systems, structures that seriously undermine the vision • Encourage risk taking and non-traditional ideas, activities and actions • Get rid of obstacles and routines that adverse change • Facilitate new behaviours by the example of the guiding coalition and example TRIGGERS FOR CHANGE
    • 25. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleTRIGGERS FOR CHANGE – Trigger 5 : Ensure resources for Short-term Projects and Wins • Ensure budgets and human resources for demonstrative and innovative projects that have proven to be successful in other countries • Ensure budgets and committed staff to initiate risk projects • Hire and promote employees who can implement the vision.(in case you don’t find them within your organisation, hire expertise for change from outside)
    • 26. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleTRIGGERS FOR CHANGE – Trigger 6 : Implement Demonstrative Projects and Instruments • Plan for publicly visible improvements • Facilitate and create those improvements and projects • Encourage demonstrative projects • Recognise and reward employees involved in the improvements
    • 27. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleTRIGGERS FOR CHANGE – Trigger 7 : Evaluate, Consolidate and Institutionalise New Approaches, Produce More Change • Use your increased credibility to change policies, structures and routines that don’t fit the vision • Reinvigorate the process with new projects, themes and change agents • Articulate the connections between the new behaviours and corporate success
    • 28. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleTRIGGERS FOR CHANGE – Trigger 8 : Lead and communicate the change process • Use every vehicle possible to communicate the new vision and strategies • Your change agents and change agents in waiting are the people you rely on • Mixed approach to the hesitating and the pro-active resistors. • The group of the defensive resistors should not be targeted PRO-ACTIVE RESISTORS DEFENSIVE RESISTORS BYSTANDERS CHANGE AGENTS CHANGE AGENTS IN WAITING Actively Against Neutral Strongly Supportive Yes No Have necessary attitude and skills for proposed change Commitment to Proposed Change
    • 29. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 7 Principles of Change Bandung, 21 - 23 Juni 2010 By : Kanaidi, SE., M.Si kana_ati@yahoo.com CONFLICT & STRESS MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE Training
    • 30. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 7 7 Principles of Change
    • 31. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Principle 1 : Senders and receivers Every change can be viewed from the perspective of a sender and a receiver. • A sender is anyone providing information about the change. • A receiver is anyone being given information about the change. Senders and receivers are often not in a dialogue at the onset of a change. They often talk right past one another. What a sender says and what a receiver hears are often two very different messages.
    • 32. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Principle 2 : Resistance and comfort • Their personal history • Current events in their life • Current changes at work • How much other change is going on Moreover, some employees will resist the change no matter what. The natural and normal reaction to change is resistance. Every individual has a threshold for how much change they can absorb based on:
    • 33. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Principle 3 : Authority for change • The number one success factor cited for implementing change is visible and active executive sponsorship • Moreover, the credibility of the leading sponsor for change will be judged by employees. • As a change leader, you need to be aware that effective sponsorship at the right level may determine success or failure of the project.
    • 34. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title stylePrinciple 4 : Value systems A new culture evolved in many of today's businesses. Employees: • Take ownership and responsibility for their work • Have pride in workmanship and look to improve their work processes • Feel empowered to make decisions that improve their product and the level of customer service • Focus on results
    • 35. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Principle 5 : Incremental versus radical change Change management activities should be scaled based on the type and size of the change. Change can be broken down into two types : • Incremental change • Radical change
    • 36. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Principle 6 : The right answer is not enough • In fact, a good solution design does not mean that implementation will always be successful or that you will actually realize the business results you expect. • Effective change management programs will engage employees early in the process, focus on results and effectively integrate employee feedback into the business solution.
    • 37. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title stylePrinciple 7 : Change is a process The ADKAR change management model (The Perfect Change), characterizes the process for individual change in five key steps: • Awareness of the need to change • Desire to participate and support the change • Knowledge about how to change • Ability to implement new skills and behaviors • Reinforcement to keep the change in place The concept of change as a process generates multiple lessons for change management teams. Managers must avoid treating changes as a single meeting or announcement.
    • 38. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Making Appropriate Behaviour Changes Bandung, 21 - 23 Juni 2010 By : Kanaidi, SE., M.Si kana_ati@yahoo.com CONFLICT & STRESS MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE Training
    • 39. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleSumber Potensi STRES SUMBER-SUMBER POTENSIAL KONSEKUENSI 1.Faktor Lingkungan: -ketidakpastian ekonomi -ketidakpastian politik -perubahan teknologi 2.Faktor Organisasional : -Tuntutan tugas -tuntutan peran -Tuntutan antarpersonal 3.Faktor Personal : - Persoalan Keluarga - Persoalan Ekonomi - Kepribadian 1.Gejala gejala Psikologis - Sakit kepala - Tekanan darah tinggi - Sakit jantung 2. Gejala gejala Pskologis - Kecemasan - depresi - Menurunnya tingkat kepuasan kerja 3.Gejala gejala perilaku - Produktivitas - Kemangkiran - Perputaran karyawan -
    • 40. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style
    • 41. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Taksonomi PERILAKU MANUSIA  Perilaku manusia merupakan segala sesuatu yang diperbuat atau dikerjakan oleh manusia, yang merupakan kompleks dari gejala-gejala jiwa.  Gejala-gejala jiwa manusia : o Kognetif/Intelektual o Afektif/Moral o Konasi (Psikomotorik)/sosial/ketrampilan. Perubahan Perilaku manusia mencakup ketiga aspek tersebut.
    • 42. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 1. Teori Stimulus Organisme Perilaku terbentuk sbg respon terhadap perangsang tertentu oleh karena itu perilaku dapat berubah jika terdapat perangsang yang intensitasnya melebihi perangsang sebelumnya.
    • 43. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 2. Teori Festinger (Dissonance Theory)  Perilaku seseorang dapat berubah jika pada dirinya terjadi ketidak seimbangan psikologis.  Ketidak seimbangan mendorong ybs untuk kembali ke keadaan seimbang atau tenang secara psikologis. Dan hal ini bisa dicapai dengan melakukan perubahan perilaku. 1/29/2015 43
    • 44. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 3. Teori Fungsi Perilaku manusia berhubungan dg kebutuhannya. Perilaku memiliki fungsi instrumental, artinya berfungsi untuk memenuhi kebutuhan. Perilaku berfungsi sbg pertahanan diri dalam menghadapi lingkungan. Perilaku berfungsi untuk menyesuaikan diri terhadap apa yang terjadi. Perilaku merupakan perwujudan/ekspresi diri . 1/29/2015 44
    • 45. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title stylePerubahan Perilaku Perubahan Perilaku dikelompokkan menjadi tiga: • Perubahan Alamiah • Perubahan Terencana • Kesediaan untuk Berubah
    • 46. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title stylePerubahan alamiah : Perubahan alamiah Perubahan disebabkan krn kejadian alamiah. Apabila dlm masyarakat sekitar terjadi suatu perubahan lingkungan fisik atau sosial budaya dan ekonomi, maka anggota-anggota masyarakat didlmnya juga akan mengalami perubahan. Perubahan terencana : Perubahan terencana Perubahan direncanakan sendiri oleh subjek .
    • 47. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Apabila terjadi suatu inovasi di dlm masyarakat, maka yg sering terjadi adalah : • Sebagian orang sangat cepat utk menerima inovasi atau perubahan tsb, • Sebagian lagi sangat lambat utk menerima perubahan tsb. Hal ini disebabkan setiap orang mempunyai kesediaan utk berubah yg berbeda-beda. Kesediaan utk Berubahan :
    • 48. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Try to Avoid STRESS when you can • Pikirkan– situasi apa yang menyebabkan Anda Stres • Dapatkah Anda mengubah Perilaku untuk menghindari situasi stres • Anggap suatu yang biasa saja • Tingkatkan harga diri dan perilaku positif • Belajar untuk cepat beradaptasi dalam perubahan
    • 49. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style
    • 50. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style LIMA LANGKAH PROSES PENGELOLAAN DIRI 1. Santai/rilek 2. Kenali emosi anda 3. Kendalikan diri 4. Bersikap sungguh-sungguh 5. Merasa & berpikir positif
    • 51. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style The Link between Good Communication and Decreased Stress Bandung, 21 - 23 Juni 2010 By : Kanaidi, SE., M.Si kana_ati@yahoo.com
    • 52. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleThe Problems ? • Ever YOU meet the Problems ?
    • 53. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title styleKnowing Your Sources and Signs of Stress In pairs or small groups: Turn to the first page of your Taking Care of Our Courses and discuss the following questions: • What are my sources of stress? • How do I know when I am experiencing stress? • What are my stress reactions?
    • 54. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Thought-Behavior-Emotion Cycle
    • 55. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Focus on what is in your control Put aside what is out of your control • Examples of areas in your control: • Your ability to prioritize work & personal obligations • Your reactions to events and people • Your thoughts • Focusing on areas in your control results in: • Feeling empowered • Feeling relief • Examples of areas outside of your control: • How people respond to you • Other people’s feelings • Focusing on areas outside of your control results in: • Feeling hopeless • Feeling anxious • Feeling STRESSED The Role of Control in Stress Reduction
    • 56. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Our Personal Role in Stress Reduction • Recognize that thoughts impact your behavior and emotions • “Talk Back” to your unhelpful thoughts • Focus on what is in your control versus out of your control • Keep a flexible and revolving door approach to the types of activities or strategies you choose to reduce stress
    • 57. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Every Day Strategies to Reduce Stress • Eat a well- balanced diet; drink fluids low in sugar, calories, and caffeine; have healthy snacks; and drink water! • Sleep well • Exercise: any activity that you find enjoyable • Create time each day to decompress • Talk with friends, peers, avoid gossip and hurtful conversations • Write in a journal or e-book • Pair enjoyable activities/tasks with less enjoyable activities /tasks • Reward yourself for a job well done
    • 58. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Practice techniques to reduce your level of stress • Create your individualized action plan for managing stress • Activity: Revisiting Keeping A Stress Log • Activity: Practice stress reduction • Activity: Practice effective communication • Activity: My Individualized Action Plan
    • 59. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Revisiting Keeping a Stress Log There are a number of step for keeping and making use of a stress log • Record your stressors within a time period and rate your stress response • Review the types of stressors you experienced, your response, their frequency, and any common themes • Note Next Steps including your strengths, challenges, and plans to improve how you will manage stress in next steps and your Individualized Action Plan
    • 60. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Communication Techniques to reduce your level of stress Active Listening • Builds relationships and sends a message of respect for the thoughts and experiences of others. • Involves listening to the content of the conversation as well as feelings and non-verbal cues within the message • Instead of: • Speaker: I finally finished all of my work. • Listener: Oh good, now you can help clean up. • Active Listener: You must feel relieved, that was a lot of work.
    • 61. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style Positive Self-Statements • Introduce repetitive positive and motivating statements into your day and in reaction to your thoughts • Examples of positive statements: • I am smart! I work hard! I always do my best. • Examples of positive thought replacements: • Instead of: “ I need to be perfect or I fail.” • Replace with: “ I did a great job learning this new curriculum!”
    • 62. Click to edit Master title styleClick to edit Master title style 62 Contact Us : Kanaidi, SE., M.Si (Trainer & Dosen, Penulis, Peneliti, dan PeBisnis) e-mail : kana_ati@yahoo.com atau kanaidi@yahoo.com Telp : 022-2009570 ext.118 Fax : 022-2009568 HP. 0812 2353 284 www.ken-kanaidi.blogspot.com www.ken-sukses.blogspot.com www.pemimpin.unggul.com www.google.com “Sukses kanaidi” www.formulabisnis.com/?id=ken_kanaidi Ω Problem StatementΩ Mapping Ω Strategic Direction ►►► Conclusion