Uploaded on

Leading focus groups is a credible research method if done properly. It is not an informal discussion group. Learn the basics of this approach and some of the available resources. For related …

Leading focus groups is a credible research method if done properly. It is not an informal discussion group. Learn the basics of this approach and some of the available resources. For related resources, visit our website: www.kenhaycock.com.

More in: Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,063
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
3

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001
  • Focus Groups October, 2001

Transcript

  • 1. Focus Groups Group interview wherein participants from similar backgrounds engage in discussion, Based on personal experience, with a moderator who raises specific topic(s). Dr. Ken Haycock 2011 For related resources, visit our website: www.kenhaycock.com
  • 2. Introduction
      • Special Features
        • Qualitative research. Interaction to generate data..
        • Joint construction of meaning. Explore attitudes, feelings, beliefs, based on personal experience.
        • What is said is essential data. Rich in data.
        • One to two hours. Six to eight participants [4-10]
  • 3. History
    • Academic Research
        • 1920s-1940s Robert Merton and Paul Lacarsfeld
        • 1980s—
    • Marketing Research
        • 1950s—
        • problems and examples
  • 4. Myths
    • Cheap and Quick
    • Needs Professional Moderators
    • Requires Special Facilities
    • Must Consist of Strangers
    • Not for Sensitive Topics
    • Produces Conformity
    • Tells How People Will Behave
    • Must Be Validated
  • 5. Basic Uses of Focus Groups
    David Morgan & Richard Krueger. The focus group guidebook. (Focus Group Kit 1). Sage, 1998. p. 14. Academic Research Product Marketing Evaluation Research Quality Improvement Problem Identification Generating Research Questions Generating New Product Ideas Needs Assessment Identifying Opportunities Planning Research Design Developing New Products Program Development Planning Interventions Implementation Data Collection Monitoring Customer Response Process Evaluation Implementing Interventions Assessment Data Analysis Refining Product or Marketing Outcome Evaluation Assessment Redesign
  • 6. Considerations
    • When to Use
      • Problem identification
      • Planning
      • Implementation
      • Assessment
    • When to Avoid
      • Making final decisions/commitments
      • Sensitive topics
      • Saving time/money
      • Requirement for statistical data
  • 7. Design
    • Research Objectives
    • Sample
    • Site
    • Screener Questionnaire
    • Discussion Guide
    • Moderator
  • 8. Research Objectives
    • Problem?
    • Major Objective?
    • Information Needs?
    • Research objectives will determine purpose and nature of focus group.
  • 9. Site & Scheduling
    • Location
    • Accessibility
    • Parking
    • Equipment
    • Refreshments
    • Hosting Services
    • Sample population considerations for when as well as where .
  • 10. Sample
    • Recruiting Profile
      • Reflects problem statement and research questions
      • Purposeful; Dimensional; Homogeneous
      • Quotas
      • Matrix for Criteria
  • 11. Screener Questionnaire
    • Purpose
    • Questions for Eligibility
    • Confidentiality
    • Invitation to Participate
    • Fee
    • Confirmation Letter
  • 12. Discussion Guide
    • Introduction
    • Issue or Problem Questions
    • Concept/Product Presentation
    • Potential Effects/Initial Evaluation
    • Standout Features
    • Closing Comments
  • 13. Moderator
    • Abilities and Aptitudes
    • You as Moderator
    • Dress/Gender
    • Co-moderators
  • 14. Moderation
    • Introduce
      • Introductions
      • Purpose
      • Ground rules
    • Conduct
      • Keep focused
      • Maintain momentum
      • Get closure
  • 15. Moderation
    • Analyze
      • From transcripts, tapes, notes, memory
      • Words, context, frequency, intensity
      • Constructing meaning
    • Report
      • Key findings
      • Recommendations
      • Make implications explicit
  • 16. Special Situations
    • Medium and Venue
      • Smaller/larger groups
      • Telephone; video; Internet
    • Participants
      • Children; Seniors; Senior Management
      • International groups
    Problems?
  • 17. Considerations
    • Advantages
      • Coordinated/conducted/evaluated in short period of time
      • Probing and clarification easier
      • Allows for argument/clarification
    • Disadvantages
      • Recruitment/organization difficult
      • Group effects/Discomfort
      • Less control
      • Difficult to analyze
  • 18. Ethical Considerations
    • Due to The Client
    • Due to The Vendor
    • Due to The Participant
  • 19. Where to Get More Information
    • Other sessions/conferences
    • Several titles available, e.g.,
      • The focus group research handbook . Holly Edmunds. American Marketing Association/NTC Business Books, 1999.
      • The focus group kit . David Morgan and Richard Krueger. Sage, 1998. 5 volumes.
    • Chapters of research methods texts
    • Electronic resources
  • 20. Contact us…
    • Dr. Ken Haycock
      • 778.689.5938
      • [email_address]
    • For related resources, visit our website:
    • www.kenhaycock.com