Hanging Out, Messing Around,      and Geeking Out:     Chapter 3 Intimacy          Kelsey O’Brien            CMS 298
Teen’s, Dating, & New Media UseTeenager’s use of new media towards dating practices isunknown and somewhat scary to adults...
http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-1/Internet-adoption.aspx
Dating & CourtshipAfter the Industrial Revolution- Parents, families, andcommunities heavily monitored young people’s cour...
Dating & Courtship                                                                                                        ...
Primary TechnologiesCell Phones- teens can maintain private lines ofcommunication, keep continual contact, and use as amea...
Meeting & FlirtingTeens recognize that certain technologies and practices are appropriate for some relationshipstages and ...
http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-1/How-teens-use-social-network-sites.aspx
Hyperpersonal EffectOnline intimacy may be heightened in a way that is nottranslated into the same intimacy in an offline ...
Meeting & FlirtingMost teenagers expressed concern and hesitation about meeting people onlineHowever, in the case of margi...
http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-2/Section-2.aspx
Going OutTeens use media technology to go beyond institutionalconstraints which allow them to maintain relationship that t...
Going OutTeens use media outlets to define their relationshipstatus, post pictures, and show affection“Hands off” message-...
http://tommytoy.typepad.com/tommy-toy-pbt-consultin/2010/08/the-social-networking-and-media-habits-of-american-teens-and-s...
Breaking UpThe new digital media practices done by teens, requires them to clean upthe digital remnants of their relations...
Breaking UpBreakups after often represented passively through statuschanges or actively through public messagesPassively p...
Breaking Up“The same technology used to publicly affirm intimaterelationships can be used to publicly demonstrate their de...
Privacy      Teens view the ability to communicate with      others without adults around as important      They may be ab...
Monitoring & BoundariesTypes of monitoring include: investigating crushes,using a shared password, checking up on asignifi...
Monitoring & BoundariesSome youth alter their digital footprints: messages, search and browser history, phone numbers,text...
VulnerabilityThrough digital media, teens become more susceptible to beingvictimized by friends, acquaintances, and other ...
VulnerabilityA small number of teensreported having negativeinteractions with predatory-type adults onlineMarginalized tee...
ConclusionTeens create their complex emotional and social worlds publicly and privately. Both online andoffline.New media ...
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Cms 298 ch. 3

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  • Cms 298 ch. 3

    1. 1. Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Chapter 3 Intimacy Kelsey O’Brien CMS 298
    2. 2. Teen’s, Dating, & New Media UseTeenager’s use of new media towards dating practices isunknown and somewhat scary to adultsTheir practices incorporating new media include meeting,flirting, going out, and breaking upAlong with the above attributes the issues of monitoring,privacy, and vulnerability also become topics of discussion
    3. 3. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-1/Internet-adoption.aspx
    4. 4. Dating & CourtshipAfter the Industrial Revolution- Parents, families, andcommunities heavily monitored young people’s courtingpractices where young men would “call” on youngwomenSlang term “date” was established based on these“calling” practices due to the lack of domestic space thatyoung women needed to entertain the young men, thusthe couple would go out http://www.angelpig.net/victorian/courtship.html1920’s- Youth moved from work places to publicschools, school dances were developed, and automobileownership laid groundwork for the culture ofcontemporary teen dating http://boudoirdenver.tumblr.com/post/13305990687/1920s-couples-
    5. 5. Dating & Courtship 1950’s- Teen dating norms became customary and more formalized by the practice of “going steady” “Going steady” was reflected by the trading of class rings, letter sweaters, or wearing matching sweater jackets http://nicoteen.tumblr.com/post/9435088678 1970’s & 1980’s- practices of “going steady” declined and dating became one of many forms of social contact amongst each other Vocabulary change- “Courtship” and “dating” have been replaced by “hanging out” and “going out with someone” “Contemporary relationships among teens tend to be ‘casual, intense, and brief.’” (p. 119)http://mixtapemaestro.net/2010/10/the-peptides-dont-leave-me-this-way-harold-melvin-the-blue-notes-cover.html/1950s-love
    6. 6. Primary TechnologiesCell Phones- teens can maintain private lines ofcommunication, keep continual contact, and use as ameans to keep tabs on one anotherInstant-Messaging- provides a means for frequent andcasual contact amongst each otherSocial Networking Site Profiles- an outlet forrepresentation of intimacy allowing for teens todemonstrate the intimacy of a particular relationshipthrough text and visuals http://y-i-media.blogspot.com/2008/05/cell-phones-at-school.htmlThese outlets allow for teens to forge romanticrelationships by going beyond institutional andgeographical constraints
    7. 7. Meeting & FlirtingTeens recognize that certain technologies and practices are appropriate for some relationshipstages and that some are notWritten communication such as text messages, instant messages, and comments on socialnetwork sites are better for the “getting to know you” initiation because it allows for control overthe intimacy explorationPhone calls, texting, and in-person conversation typically occur if the relationship intensifiesTeens feel less vulnerable using IM’s, texts, and social networking sites than in face-to-facecommunication. They are given time to think about what they are going to say.Teens flirt while proceeding cautiously and trying to figure out the other person’s feelings
    8. 8. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-1/How-teens-use-social-network-sites.aspx
    9. 9. Hyperpersonal EffectOnline intimacy may be heightened in a way that is nottranslated into the same intimacy in an offline relationshiphttp://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/c/cyber_dating.asp http://members.pioneer.net/~mchumor/chat_rooms1_bframe.html
    10. 10. Meeting & FlirtingMost teenagers expressed concern and hesitation about meeting people onlineHowever, in the case of marginalized teens, the Internet allows them to meet others likethemselvesThey can participate in digital contact to provide a way for them to be heard or a part of acommunityGabbie- 17 year old Chinese teenager from California used social networking site Asiantown.netto find a Chinese boyfriend because her community had limited other potentialsRobert- 17 year old white, gay student at a private school in Chicago expressed his frustrationabout not finding other guys to date offline by writing a “note” on Facebook which led to himbeing introduced to another boy, Matt, through a mutual friend who read Robert’s note
    11. 11. http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-2/Section-2.aspx
    12. 12. Going OutTeens use media technology to go beyond institutionalconstraints which allow them to maintain relationship that theirparents may not approve of and to manage relationships that aregeographically challengingThey expect that not only will the relationship be publiclyacknowledge through digital media but also that there will beconstant contact and availability
    13. 13. Going OutTeens use media outlets to define their relationshipstatus, post pictures, and show affection“Hands off” message- the amount of time that a couplehas been together reflects the intensity and depth of theirrelationship to let others know not to interfere with themTeens have the sense that the status of the relationship isbest to be made interpersonally before announcing itdigitallyThe expectation for availability leads to mobile phonesbeing used to keep a short leash on significant others http://www.marketingcharts.com/direct/3-in-10-teens-text-more-than-100-times-daily-21555/pew-teens-daily-communication-choices-ma
    14. 14. http://tommytoy.typepad.com/tommy-toy-pbt-consultin/2010/08/the-social-networking-and-media-habits-of-american-teens-and-some-interesting-myths.html
    15. 15. Breaking UpThe new digital media practices done by teens, requires them to clean upthe digital remnants of their relationship following a break upTeens view using the media as a poor way to break up with another witha male teenager, Grady, describes breaking up with someone via IM ortext as “lame”“Teens acknowledge that breaking up in person is preferable to usingtext messages, instant messages, or messaging functions on socialnetwork sites, because face-to-face interaction is more respectful.” (p.133)
    16. 16. Breaking UpBreakups after often represented passively through statuschanges or actively through public messagesPassively public breakups consists of the quiet removal ofpictures, a change in a relationship status, or reordering the listof FriendsAn actively public breakup consists of public animosity, angrymessages towards the specific ex, and by seeking publicvalidation from other friends
    17. 17. Breaking Up“The same technology used to publicly affirm intimaterelationships can be used to publicly demonstrate their demiseand to communicate anger toward someone with whom a teenmay no longer have direct contact.” (p. 137)
    18. 18. Privacy Teens view the ability to communicate with others without adults around as important They may be able to maintain relationships with people their parents may not approve of
    19. 19. Monitoring & BoundariesTypes of monitoring include: investigating crushes,using a shared password, checking up on asignificant otherSharing a password denotes intimacy and allows theother to monitor private aspects and change thepublic parts of a profileCouples view it as a way to maintain a connectionwhen apartSharing a password is both an intimacy intensifierand an invasion of privacyCouple’s use it as a boundary guidelineWhen it is refused to be shared, girlfriends usuallyget frustrated perhaps because they view knowing it http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-3.aspx?view=allas having power
    20. 20. Monitoring & BoundariesSome youth alter their digital footprints: messages, search and browser history, phone numbers,text messages, or even changing names in their phonesCertain types of monitoring that occurs during teenager’s relationships can escalate to seriousemotional control or abuse“The monitoring capabilities afforded by digital media seem like a way to manage such anxiety asteens seek to put to rest their fears about vulnerability and betrayal. The ability to monitor othersthrough these new media venues allows teens to learn about others and makes them vulnerable tosurveillance and control by others.” (p. 141)
    21. 21. VulnerabilityThrough digital media, teens become more susceptible to beingvictimized by friends, acquaintances, and other adultsBoys feel less vulnerable by being able to text or message a girlso they can save face and not stumble over their wordsThe amount and speed at which information can travel can maketeens more vulnerable Example- taking an embarrassing picture of someone and posting it on Facebook or mass text-messaging it around
    22. 22. VulnerabilityA small number of teensreported having negativeinteractions with predatory-type adults onlineMarginalized teens may beat more risk to encounterdangerous situations http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Teens-and-social-media/Part-2/Section-1.aspx
    23. 23. ConclusionTeens create their complex emotional and social worlds publicly and privately. Both online andoffline.New media allows for teen’s to practice intimacy publicly and privately; while doing sosimultaenouslyRelationships and talking about them is encouraged and allowed by new mediaThe digital technologies that teens use cause their interactions with peers and the pressures theyface to be consistently available“The snapshot of contemporary teens’ intimacy practices presented in this chapter indicates thattoday’s teens are part of a significant shift in how intimate communication and relationships arestructured, expressed, and publicized. Networked publics of different sizes and scalescontextualize these intimate communications and practices, allowing youth to observe theintimate interactions of others, and conversely, to display their own emotions, practices, andrelationships to select publics.” (p. 147)

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