Reading matters

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Reading is critical to your child's future not only in academics but also professionally.

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Reading matters

  1. 1. The U.S. Department of Education suggests that “reading ability is a key predictor of achievement in mathematics and science, and the global information economy requires today’s American youth to have far more advanced literacy skills than those required by any previous generation” (Kamil et al., 2008, p. 1).. READING MATTERS!! Waukesha.k12.wi.us
  2. 2. The reality is students of today will face challenging literacy demands in tomorrow’s competitive workplace. According to Rampey, Dion, and Donahue (2009), “the average reading score for seventeen year olds was not significantly different from that in 1971” (p. 1). However, the demands of today’s workplace are very different from 1971. WORKPLACE OF TOMORROW office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  3. 3. In a report, Reading Next-A Vision for Action and Research in Middle School and High School Literacy (Biancarosa & Snow, 2004), 53% of high school graduates have to enroll in remedial reading courses in college and only 70% of high school graduates actually graduate on time with a regular diploma. ALARMING STATS office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  4. 4. ANALYZING THE PROBLEMS AND PITFALLS WITH ADOLESCENT ILLITERACY 123rf.com
  5. 5. 5 Common Pitfalls Plaguing Adolescent Literacy Comprehension Choice Communication Content Area Strategies Computer Use BEWARE OF THE 5 C’S office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  6. 6. According to The Literacy Needs for Adolescence in Their Own Words, reading intervention programs for adolescent students too often focus on phonics in scripted reading programs when the real problem is a lack of comprehension (Pitcher et al., 2010). Reading instruction in public schools is designed more to fix the learners instead of addressing the learning conditions that match student needs (Alvermann, 2003). A common conclusion regarding struggling adolescent readers is that they lack the learning strategies and self-checking skills that they need to comprehend what they read. (Biancarosa & Snow, 2004). COMPREHENSION office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  7. 7. According to Strommen & Mates (2004), studies have indicated that few adolescence choose to read on their own. Reading instruction is often scripted and teacher centered as opposed to student centered with opportunities for book choice. In general, research on adolescent’s motivation to read shows that there is a population of “alliterate adolescence” who are capable of reading but choose not to (Alvermmann, 2003). CHOICE Magtheweekly.com office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  8. 8. Adolescent parents feel there is not enough communication with the middle school providing tips on how to help their child by explaining what type of curriculum is being used and how they can best support classroom instruction (Pitcher et al., 2010). COMMUNICATION office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  9. 9. Adolescent students in content area classes receive little to no help with effective reading strategies which would help them understand the content materials being taught. The lowest reading comprehension scores are often in expository informational text, which is at the core of most secondary education, college, and future employment (Pitcher et al., 2010). CONTENT AREA STRATEGIES office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/academic
  10. 10. Many traditional programs do not make use of the computer to vary instructional activities when many of today’s students are computer literate. According to Phelps (2006), “An expanded concept of ‘text’ must transcend print-based texts to also include various electronic media and adolescents’ own culture and social understandings” (p.4). COMPUTER USE

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