Why Mobile Matters
The
Cultural
Significance

of
On‐the‐Go
Connectivity




                                              ...
image: Stephan Geyer




abstract
In
this
ePaper
we
explore
the
cultural
significance
of
on‐the‐go
connectivity
via

mobil...
mobile
marketing
&
the
necessity
to
compete




                                                                          ...
a
connected
citizenry
always
on



on
the
go
          &
           Increasingly
today
people
are
living
digitally
 tether...
.5 .



1immediacy
modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends


              increasing


Today
 society
 and
 the
 economy...


 2location‐aware
                  becoming


image: ntr23
                                                            M...
3      ambient
                                           accessibility


                                                ...
4                mobile
                 personalization
Mobile
phones
are
widely
 regarded
as
the
most
personal
digital
d...


5pleasure
              connected


Although
once
we
heard
a
lot
of
 push‐back
about
BlackBerrys
as
electronic
leashes,
...
mobile
devices
&
demographics

audience
segments
&
cross‐generational
engagement




image Rego




             Mobile
 u...
cross‐generation
mobile
trends:
             connected
cocooning
                                                      Not...
cross‐gen
trends:
                    media
sharing
                                 including
senior
surfers
The
iPad
is
...
mobile
marketing
with
cross‐generational
appeal
                                                                          ...
mobile
marketing
and
audience
segments                                &
                                             men

...
image: j.o.h.n. walker




professionals &
workshifting

mobile


  Busy
 professionals
 need
 a
 particular
 suite
 of
 m...
mobile
marketing
and
audience
segments

raising
the
iGeneration
iPhone
Moms
Some
of
the
top

ways
digital
moms

use
their
...
image: Paul Mayne




smartphone
as
digital
pacifier



  41% iPhone
moms          download
apps
for
their
techno‐tots25
  ...
mobile
culture,
mCommerce
digital
primacy
and
mobile
proclivities




                                                    ...
image: Steve Kay




driving
behavior
& mobile
engagements
      By
delivering
highly
personalized
incentives
to
a
person’...
image: iskanderbenamor




       event
participation
We
 can
 use
 mobile
 campaigns
 to
 encourage
 participation
 in
 c...
image: nan palmero




                                                   check‐ins
If
 the
goal
 is
 to
expand
 databases...
.22.
        If
your
marketing
and
communications
objective
is
to
increase
online

        traffic
 to
 a
 website
 0r
 foot...
.23.

If
your
goal
is
to
build
sustained
relationships
between
brands
and
consumers,
the
most

obvious
mobile
marketing
op...
supporting
brand
advocacy
If
 an
objective
 of
your
mobile
campaign
is
to
encourage
brand
affinity
 and
advocacy,

providi...
image: ismh_




conclusion
   In
 the
 mobile
 e‐commerce
 ecosystem
 we
 see
 innovative

   formats
for
delivering
cont...
image: Daniel Y. Go



references
1. On‐demand
webinar
sponsored
by
DigitalCement.com
and
produced
by
MarketingProfs.com

...
9. According
to
JP
Morgan
report
https://mm.jpmorgan.com/stp/t/c.do?i=E8283‐
    B8&u=a_p*d_423260.pdf*h_2tvncakf.
10.
blo...
image: B G



about the author

     Sidneyeve
Matrix,
PhD.

     Queen's
National
Scholar,
Media
&
Film
@
Queen's
Univers...
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Mobile Matters

  1. 1. Why Mobile Matters The
Cultural
Significance
 of
On‐the‐Go
Connectivity image: papadont mobile
engagement
trends
 an
ePaper
by
Sidneyeve
Matrix
 social media design + build
  2. 2. image: Stephan Geyer abstract In
this
ePaper
we
explore
the
cultural
significance
of
on‐the‐go
connectivity
via
 mobile
phones,
with
the
aim
of
identifying
the
most
impactful
trends
for
mobile
 marketing
and
communications.
 We
 begin
 with
 a
 roundup
 of
 five
 key
 mobile
 consumer
 habits.
 Next,
 after
 pointing
 to
 some
 cross‐demographic
 trends,
 we
 focus
 on
 a
 number
 of
 consumer
segments
from
“techno‐tots”
to
“silver
surfers”
 and
describe
how
 and
 why
 they
 reach
 for
 cell/smart
 phones
 (and
 tablets)
 as
 everyday
 communications
technologies.
Finally,
we
identify
a
range
of
mobile
marketing
 objectives,
content,
and
campaign
ideas
designed
to
motivate
different
types
of
 mobile
engagements. This
research
is
also
available
as
an
on‐demand
webinar.1 .2.
  3. 3. mobile
marketing &
the
necessity
to
compete image: johncatral introduction A
recent
survey
by
R2
Integrated
asked
marketers
why
mobile
matters
 from
 their
perspective.
2
 Respondents
identified
the
 top
three
 reasons
 for
launching
a
mobile
campaign
as
lead
generation,
direct
sales,
and
a
 perceived
necessity
to
compete
in
the
mobile
marketplace.
 To
 compete
 in
 this
 space
 it’s
 necessary
 to
 have
 a
 clear
 picture
 of
 emergent
forms
and
patterns
of
mobile
media
use.
In
other
words,
we
 need
to
understand
how
and
why
mobile
matters
to
consumers. Being
 precise
 about
 the
 uniqueness
 of
 mobile
 consumer
 behavior
 patterns,
how
they
are
distinct
from
online
media
use
habits,
will
spark
 ideas
for
innovative
mobile
 communications
campaigns
that
add
value
 for
users
and
achieve
measurable
results.
 .3.
  4. 4. a
connected
citizenry always
on



on
the
go & Increasingly
today
people
are
living
digitally
 tethered
yet
location‐ independent
 lifestyles
 and
 engaging
 in
 nomadic
 work
 styles.
 Correspondingly,
 we
 see
 an
 upswing
 in
 smartphone,
 laptop,
 netbook,
 and
 tablet
 adoptions.
 The
 most
 in‐demand
 of
 these
 devices
 offer
 the
 most
 multifunctionality‐‐‐enabling
 mobile
 connectivity
plus
a
variety
of
geo‐utilities. In
 response,
 users
 embrace
 portable
 computing
 habits,
 develop
 agile
 information
 desires
and
needs,
 and
 practice
 new
modes
 of
 mobile
engagement.
 Let’s
consider
some
examples. image: Valerie Everett
  5. 5. .5 . 1immediacy modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends increasing
 Today
 society
 and
 the
 economy
 are
 moving
 at
 an
 ever
 greater
 velocity
 largely
 because
 of
 mobile
 and
 social,
 digital
and
networked
technologies.
 That’s
 giving
 rise
 to
 a
 complexly
 connected
 real‐time
 digital
 culture
 wherein
 we
 see
 new
 notions
 of
 value
 based
 on
immediacy
 and
instantaneity.
 In
 other
 words,
 we
 want
 our
 information
 and
 connectivity
 and
 we
 want
them
 now.
In
fact
for
 many,
real
 time
is
not
fast
enough,
to
quote
Jeremy
 Owyang.3 As
 a
 result,
 trends
 in
 real‐time
 search
 and
 social
 networking
 are
 quickly
 ramping
 up.
 For
 marketing
 and
 communications
 professionals
 that
 means
ensuring
campaigns
and
sites
are
 accessible
 on
 mobile
 devices
 and
 optimized
for
SEO
has
never
been
more
 crucial.
 Quickly
findable,
fast‐ loading,
painless
to
 navigate
in
a
hurry,
and
 ready
to
share
in
an
 instant.
That’s
mobile‐ optimized
content. . .
  6. 6. 
 2location‐aware becoming image: ntr23 Mobile
 technology
 and
 wi‐fi
 connectivity
 reconfigures
 social
and
urban
spaces.

 As
Chris
Thorp
observed,
GPS
 digital
 sociability
 has
 the
 e f f e c t
 o f
 m a k i n g
 t h e
 anonymous
 and
 impersonal,
 such
 as
 the
 city
 street,
 personal
again.

 4 Thus
we
 see
the
 emergence
 of
 the
 geotagged
 city,
 wherein
 services
 like
 Yelp
 mean
 establishments
 gain
 increased
 transparency.
 And
 because
of
the
 power
of
 P2P
 recommendations
 and
 how
 they
 affect
 purchase
 decisions,
 we
 can
 say
 with
 confidence
that
geosocial
networking
is
changing
the
relationship
of
clients
to
the
 marketplace.
 The
 task
 for
mobile
 marketing
 and
communications
is
to
 increase
campaign
and
 brand
georelevance
for
on‐the‐go
users.
Ensuring
business
is
geolocation
ready
and
 discoverable
to
GPS/LBS
apps
is
critical, 
because
if
you’re
not
on
the
map,
you’re
invisible. modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends .6.
  7. 7. 3 ambient accessibility image: theCarol Mobile
technologies
profoundly
impact
our
relationships.
When
friends
and
family
 cannot
be
physically
 in
proximity,
and
often
even
when
we
are
in
shared
spaces,
 users
will
 opt
 for
the
ambient
 accessibility
 of
 text‐connect.
Mobile
 phones
allow
 people
to
maintain
a
sense
of
connected
presence,
and
as
such
they
can
be
said
to
 extend
 (and
 even
 enrich)
 communities
 and
 relationships.
 We
 use
 our
 cell‐
 and
 smart‐phones
to
participate
in
social
events
and
each
other’s
lives. Put
differently,
mobile
phones
are
technologies
for
social
cohesion. For
 marketing
 and
 communications
 professionals,
 this
 means
 building
 on
 the
 premise
that
that
mobile
phones
are
widely
regarded
as
a
social
media
lifeline.
The
 best
 mobile
 messaging
 truly
 “gets”
 the
 importance
 consumers
place
 on
 mobile
 phones
as
pass‐cards
that
unlock
access
to
the
important
people
in
their
lives,
and
 keys
to
their
online
reputation
and
public
profiles.
 Not
just
a
phone,
but
a
remote
control
for
life. modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends .7.
  8. 8. 4 mobile personalization Mobile
phones
are
widely
 regarded
as
the
most
personal
digital
device
of
all.
They
 hold
so
much
intimate
data
that
many
people
confess
it
would
be
more
catastrophic
 to
lose
their
phone
than
their
wallet.
 Those
devices
are
personalized
in
another
way
too:
as
users
load
up
mobile
devices
 with
apps,
images,
BBM/SMS,
email,
wallpapers,
ringtones,
music,
podcasts,
video,
 passwords
 and
 account
 numbers,
 every
 phone
 becomes
exquisitely
 and
uniquely
 configured‐‐‐mirroring
 a
 set
 of
 preferences
 specific
 to
 the
 owner.
 No
 two
 in‐use
 phones
are
alike. image: Ron Wiecki As
 well,
 mobile
 phones
 and
 tablets
 are
 prime
 platforms
 for
 user‐generated
 micromedia
(UGM)
and
lifecasting
(sharing
status
updates,
photos,
GPS
 checkins).
 Not
just
lists
of
contacts
and
SMS,
but
photos,
memos,
documents,
and
more. From
a
marketing
and
communications
perspective,
there
has
never
been
a
better
 time
to
design
campaigns
that
enable
mobile
content
creation
and/or
sharing
those
 digital
assets.
 This
is
a
key
 opportunity
 to
 introduce
 products
and
services
as
the
 scaffolding
supporting
digital
creativity
and
peer‐to‐peer
UGM
mobile
experiences. modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends .8.
  9. 9. 
 5pleasure connected Although
once
we
heard
a
lot
of
 push‐back
about
BlackBerrys
as
electronic
leashes,
 and
many
consumers
resisted
owning
a
mobile
phone
for
fear
of
being
too
accessible,
 today
a
wide‐scale
attitudinal
shift
has
taken
place,
such
that
by
and
large
connectivity
 is
valued
and
experienced
as
pleasurable.
 image: foreverdigital In
fact
surveys
repeatedly
confirm
that
always‐on
access
to
friends
and
family
lowers
 stress
and
increases
productivity
at
work.
Our
newly
emerging
mLifestyle
habits
and
 rituals
deliver
comfort
and
security. Mobile
 campaigns
can
capitalize
on
and
add
to
those
 pleasures
by
 delighting
users
 with
entertaining
and
emotionally
 resonant
campaigns.
 When
designing
for
mobile,
 think
of
the
platform
as
 preconfigured
with
connected
pleasure. modes
of
mobile
engagement:
5
key
trends .9 .
  10. 10. mobile
devices
&
demographics
 audience
segments &
cross‐generational
engagement image Rego Mobile
 users
 are
 segmented
 by
 demographics
 and
 devices.
 It’s
 important
 to
 have
 the
 right
 content
 on
 the
 right
 channel,
 such
 that
 device
 and
 demo
 are
 in
 sync,
 and
 the
 message
 is
 best
 positioned
to
reach
its
target. But
 before
 we
 get
 to
 differences,
 there
 are
 three
 key
 cross‐ generational
mobile
trends
worth
considering,
all
of
which
will
be
 amplified
with
the
arrival
of
the
iPad.
 They
include:
connected
cocooning,
media
sharing,
and
texting.
 .10 .
  11. 11. cross‐generation
mobile
trends: connected
cocooning Not
 all
 mobile
 use
 is
 out
 of
 home:
the
shift
from
landlines
 to
 cellphone
 and
 mainstream
 adoption
 of
 laptops,
 plus
 growing
 household
 wi‐fi
 adoption
 all
 add
 up
 to
 more
 sofa
surfing. Today
 when
 families
 watch
 television
 together
 it’s
 likely
 some
 of
 those
 present
 are
 semi‐fixated
 on
 their
 own
 private
 handheld
 media
 channel–‐with
one
eye
 on
the
 big
 screen.
 The
 New
 York
 T i m e s
 c a l l s
 t h e
 t r e n d
 connected
 cocooning,
 as
 image by: Dr_Phil individuals
 exist
 happily
 in
 personalized
media
bubbles.5 For
mobile
marketing
and
communications,
this
means
cross‐platform
campaigns
 are
 more
 likely
 to
 reach
 viewers
 who
 tend
 toward
 multi‐screen
 multi‐channel
 multi‐tasking.
If
a
TV
spot
is
truly
excellent,
we
know
audiences
will
search
for
and
 share
it
instantly
with
friends
from
their
phone. 
 As
 well,
 a
 branded
 mobile
 and
 social
 TV
 extension
 to
 an
 existing
 television
 campaign
will
engage
connected
couch‐surfers,
inviting
interaction
with
brands
 and
friend‐networks
through
texting
or
tweeting
their
spectatorship. .11 .
  12. 12. cross‐gen
trends: media
sharing including
senior
surfers The
iPad
is
ushering
in
a
new
wave
of
media
sharing,
as
the
device
is
passed
around
 the
dining
room
table
and
living
room
seating,
connecting
users
across
generations.
 Importantly,
 this
 includes
 seniors
who
find
the
larger
 screen
and
keyboard
more
 accessible
 than
 most
 
 smartphones. According
to
AARP
seniors
 love
the
iPad
and
that’s
 good
news
for
mobile

 6 messaging.


If
designing
 cross‐generational
 campaigns
that
include
 these
silver
surfers,
and
for
 senior‐specific
mobile
 initiatives,
the
iPad
might
 be
the
only
device
that
 image by: darcy1b matters. If
 that’s
the
case,
a
look
back
at
how
the
 Wii
 was
marketed
to
this
demographic
 might
be
in
order,
to
determine
which
discourses
could
be
retrofit
from
Nintendo‐‐‐ famous
for
hitting
a
home
run
in
retired
communities. Trends
show
wired
seniors
are

flocking
to
social
networking
sites
to
fight
boredom,
 isolation
 and
 loneliness.
 Because
 social
 networking
 and
 mobile
 technologies
 go
 hand
in
hand,
senior‐specific
social
mobile
iPad
apps/services
will
find
an
audience.
 .12 .
  13. 13. mobile
marketing
with cross‐generational
appeal image DCvision2006 Gen
X
&
Gen
Y,
digital

boomers
&
silver
surfers In
North
America,
about
70%
of
the
population
has
a
mobile
phone. 72 ♥ texting % mobile
phone
users 7 across
generations The
most
active
texters?
Teens
of
course,
not
a
surprise
to
anyone.
What
is
a
bit
 more
 unexpected
 is
 just
 how
 popular
 texting
is
 among
more
 mature
 users— 60%
of
the
45+
demo
are
just
as
likely
to
send
SMS
as
to
make
a
voice
call. 8 In
 a
nutshell,
 texting
 campaigns
work
 cross‐gen.
 That’s
why
 of
 the
 ad
 dollars
 allocated
to
mobile,
estimates
are
that
85%
is
spent
on
SMS
advertising.

 9 An
SMS
campaign
can
also
compliment
spots
on
other
media
platforms.
It
can
 effectively
 “activate”
 outdoor/TV
 or
 print
 ads
 with
 a
 call‐to‐action,
 assuming
 most
audiences
have
a
phone
within
reach. .13 .
  14. 14. mobile
marketing
and audience
segments & men




women image: moriza The
sexes
have
much
in
common
with
mobile
media
use
and
just
a
few
differences
that
 are
significant
to
marketers.
 Consuming:
 men
make
up
a
larger
portion
of
mobile
Web
audience
than
women
but
 that
 gap
 is
 shrinking.
10 The
 top
 mobile
 websites
 for
 women
 are:
 shopping,
 social
 
 11 networking,
recipes,
news
and
celebrity
gossip.



Women
download
more
apps
to
their
 12 phones
than
men
do.



Men
watch
more
mobile
TV
than
the
fairer
sex,
largely
due
to
 the
fact
that
sports
is
the
main
driver
of
all
mobile
TV
viewing.13 Communicating:
 Women
 “tweet”
 and
 “friend”
 10%
 more
 than
 men
 according
 to
 Nielsen.
14 However
men
 consume
 a
 third
 more
 pages
 than
 women
 when
 on
 social
 
 networking
sites
like
Twitter
and
Facebook.15 Creating:
 Women
 snap,
 upload
 and
tag
 more
 photographs
from
 phonecams
than
 men
do.
This
is
why
Kodak
calls
mom
the
chief
memory
officer
for
the
family. 16 .14 .
  15. 15. image: j.o.h.n. walker professionals &
workshifting
 mobile
 Busy
 professionals
 need
 a
 particular
 suite
 of
 mobile
 functions
 and
 content
 uniquely
 configured
for
doing
 business
 on
 the
 small
screen.
 No
 surprise
 then
 that
the
fastest
growing
categories
of
mobile
apps
(beyond
social
networking)
 are
all
informational
and
organizational
(rather
than
diversions)
and
related
to
 busy
 life‐
 and
 work‐styles
 on
 the
 go.
 Weather
 information,
 news
 and
 sports
 updates,
mobile
banking,
and
maps
are
among
the
top
downloads.17 And
we’re
willing
to
pay
for
them,
because
these
apps
accelerate,
simplify,
and
 organize
 busy
 lives
and
enable
mobile
productivity
and
communication.
This
is
 increasingly
the
case
with
iPad
apps,
as
buzz
continues
to
mount
about
how
the
 device
can
serve
as
a
laptop
replacement
for
business
travelers. 18 No
surprise
then
that
the
mobile
software
market
is
experiencing
a
“gold
rush”
 on
paid
mobile
apps
according
to
research
by
the
Yankee
Group,
as
reported
in
 eMarketer.
19 In
 fact
 although
 revenue
 from
 US
 paid
 apps
 represents
 $1.6B
 at
 
 present,
industry
analysts
forecast
that
figure
will
reach
$11B
before
2015.
20 Is
it
time
to
develop
or
co‐sponsor
a
branded
app? .15 .
  16. 16. mobile
marketing
and
audience
segments raising
the
iGeneration iPhone
Moms Some
of
the
top
 ways
digital
moms
 use
their
phones:
 •finding
product
 information, •health
research,
 •price
comparisons, •leisure
shopping, •and
staying
organized. Moms
use
phones
as
 multipurpose
shopping
and
 mobile
lifestyle,
 For
more
ideas
on
marketing
to
digital
moms
using
 entertainment
and
 social
and
mobile
media
platforms
please
see
my
ePaper:
 21 “How
to
‘Click’
with
Millennial
Moms”
 productivity
tools.
 image: lankforddl on
slideshare.net,
scribd.com,
and
cyberpopblog.com.24 22 Today
7
out
of
10
babies
born
are
to
millennial
moms.




Surveys
show
that
these
 digital
moms
are
exceptionally
technosavvy,
adept
at
participating
in
the
mobile
 23 and
 social
 web,
 and
 more
 likely
 to
 use
 social
 media
 than
 average
 adults.
 
 Interestingly,
 36%
 of
 digital
 moms
 have
 a
 smartphone‐‐‐that
 is
 considerably
 higher
than
general
population,
where
we
see
about
20‐25%
smartphone
use. .16 .
  17. 17. image: Paul Mayne smartphone
as
digital
pacifier 41% iPhone
moms download
apps
for
their
techno‐tots25 Millennial
moms
understand
that 
mobile
diversions
fill
moments
of
microboredom as
they
soothe,
distract,
and
delight
kids
(and
parents
too!).
For
marketing
and
 communications
 pros
 this
 means
 sponsoring,
 co‐branding,
 and
 developing
 mobile
 educational
 games,
 entertaining
 or
 informational
 apps
 for
 the
 iGeneration
and
their
millennial
moms
makes
sense. .17 .
  18. 18. mobile
culture,
mCommerce digital
primacy
and
mobile
proclivities image: atmtx Today
the
behavioral
shift
that
Razorfish
calls
digital
primacy
involves
 users
 looking
 to
 the
 web
 first
 to
 satisfy
 their
 information
 and
 communication
 needs.
26 As
 smartphone
 adoption
 increases,
 digital
 
 primacy
gives
rise
to
mobile
proclivities‐‐‐users
becoming
more
adept
 at
accessing
data.
 For
 B2C
 mobile
 marketers,
 this
 means
 having
 an
 in‐store
 mobile
 strategy
becomes
more
important.
Because
social
shopping
trends
are
 emerging,
whether
brands
officially
support
them
or
not.
 Digital
 primacy
 means
 shoppers
 are
 interested
 in
 in‐store
 QR
 code
 campaigns
to
access
an
added
layer
of
information
about
products
on
 shelves,
 as
 well
 as
 wish‐list
 apps,
 mobile
 gift
 registries,
 mobile‐ optimized
flyers
and
mCoupons. . 18.
  19. 19. image: Steve Kay driving
behavior & mobile
engagements By
delivering
highly
personalized
incentives
to
a
person’s
mobile
 phone
impressions
are
likely
to
be
high.
The
question
becomes, what
kinds
of
behaviors
are
you
seeking
to
drive? 27 To
spark
your
imagination,
let’s
consider
some
mobile
campaign
 objectives
targeting
different
kinds
of

mobile
engagement. .19.
  20. 20. image: iskanderbenamor event
participation We
 can
 use
 mobile
 campaigns
 to
 encourage
 participation
 in
 contests
 and
 promotional
events.
For
event
planners,
the
branded
app
is
quickly
becoming
a
 must‐have
part
of
the
standard
promo
package
for
big
ticket
cultural
events.
In
 2010,
The
Super
Bowl,
Mardi
Gras
and
the
Vancouver
Olympics
used
and
inspired
 legions
of
branded
mobile
apps
to
optimize
publicity
and
participation. If
 it’s
 well‐designed
 with
 an
 intuitive
 interface,
 a
 themed
 app
 encourages
 anticipation
for
and
interest
in
your
event.
However
informational
the
utility
 is
 though,
 the
 core
 of
 the
 app
 should
 still
 be
 social,
 enabling
 and
 encouraging
 interaction
with
friends.
28 .20.
  21. 21. image: nan palmero check‐ins If
 the
goal
 is
 to
expand
 databases
through
growing
 membership
in
loyalty
programs,
it’s
good
to
consider 29 
the
mobile
phone
is
fast
becoming
the
new
loyalty
card.
 Whether
 through
 geosocial‐networking
 “mayorship”
check‐in
rewards
or
in‐store
short‐ code
texting
promotions,
invite
your
regulars
to
 receive
 mobile
 notification
 of
 insider
 tips,
 reminders,
e‐coupons
news
and
specials.
 Because
 with
 every
 check‐in,
 consumers
 narrowcast
 the
 news
 about
 their
 purchase
 habits
and
travels
to
their
GPS
friend
network. .21.
  22. 22. .22. If
your
marketing
and
communications
objective
is
to
increase
online
 traffic
 to
 a
 website
 0r
 foot
 traffic
 to
 a
 brick
 and
 mortar
location,
 a
 mobile
 campaign
 can
 be
 effective.
 Mobile
 messaging
 puts
 promotions
directly
 into
the
 purse
 or
 pocket
of
 your
target
market,
 potentially
 when
 they
 are
 at
 key
 influence
 points
 (such
 as
 in
 the
 vicinity
or
in‐aisle,
or
leisure
browsing
on
their
smartphone). And
 call
 it
 “textual
 satisfaction,”
 digital
 curiosity,
 or
 just
 ingrained
 habit,
 but
 SMS
 is
 more
 likely
 to
 be
 opened
 than
 any
 other
 direct
 response
 vehicle.
 30
 Perhaps
 this
 is
 why
 text
 e‐coupon
 redemption
 
 rates
continue
to
rise.
 And
 geofencing
 is
 catching
 on,
 a
 form
 of
 promotional
 proximity
 targeted
to

connected
consumers
on‐the‐go
and
in
your
area.
Virtual
 storefronts
 and
 geosocial
 fields
 around
 any
 venue
 can
 be
 used
 to
 trigger
 push
 notifications
 of
 news,
 events,
 and
 promotions
 to
 passers
by.
 image: victoriapeckham driving
mobile
engagement increasing
your
mobile
&
foot
traffic
  23. 23. .23. If
your
goal
is
to
build
sustained
relationships
between
brands
and
consumers,
the
most
 obvious
mobile
marketing
option
is
an
appvert
or
sponsored
mobile
 game
which,
if
it’s
 compelling
enough,
offers
continuous
engagement
and
interactivity.
This
is
the
route
New
 Balance
took
with
their
“365”
video
campaign‐‐‐an
alarm
clock
app
enabling
users
to
wake
 31 up
to
a
different
video
short
featuring
new
footwear
designs
on
their
iPhone
each
day.

 Another
 idea
 for
 driving
 sustained
 engagement
 is
 to
 follow
 the
 lead
 of
 mobile
 health
 researchers
and
organizations
who
are
using
digital
tech
and
social
media
for
social
good.
 Examples
 abound
 of
 mobile
 peer
 networks
 wherein
 participants
 opt‐in
 to
 SMS‐based
 support
groups
to
help
manage
diabetes,
stop
smoking,
or
lose
weight.
 Also
inspiring,
Mount
Sinai
Adolescent
Health
Center’s
“text
in
the
city”
campaign
is
an
 example
 of
 a
mobile
 messaging
initiative
 where
 users
can
ask
 questions
 about
 sexual
 health
and
get
replies
in
24
hours
from
professionals.
And
there’s
Johnson
and
Johnson’s
 “text
4
baby”
campaign
which
delivers
on‐demand
information
about
maternal
and
infant
 32 health
via
SMS.

 Think
 about
 developing
partnerships
 with
non‐profits
to
 launch
branded
 mobile
 public
 service
 type
 initiatives,
which
in
some
 cases
compliment
 corporate
 social
 responsibility
 programs,
and
encourage
sustained
relationships
and
network
development.
 driving
mobile
engagement sustained
relationships image: Nesster
  24. 24. supporting brand
advocacy If
 an
objective
 of
your
mobile
campaign
is
to
encourage
brand
affinity
 and
advocacy,
 providing
an
occasion
for
peer‐to‐peer
interactivity
and
content
sharing
is
key.
Ask
for
 retweets.
Support
photosharing.
Invite
votes
in
a
mobile
opinion
poll
and
show
results
 on
the
handset‐‐‐if
your
poll
is
interesting
enough
it
could
be
a
conversation
starter.
 Follow
the
example
of
Bass
Pro
 Shops
and
create
a
branded
and
 image: Josh Self customizable
e‐card
or
e‐coupon
 for
 mobile
 gifting.
 They
 launched
 a
 mobile
 campaign
 enabling
 users
 to
 use
 their
 phone
 to
 share
 a
photo
 of
 the
 fish
they
caught,
with
Facebook
 friends,
adding
a
message
about
 the
 gear
 they
 used.
 They
 could
 also
use
the
image
as
part
of
an
 instant
 personalized
 digital
 gift
 card
to
distribute
on
Facebook‐‐‐ inviting
friends
to
visit
 Bass
Pro
 Shops
 and
 gear‐up
 before
 hitting
the
lake
to
try
for
an
even
 bigger
catch. 33 The
 phone
 is
 a
 social
 media
 lifeline‐‐‐get
 your
 brand
 involved
 in
 the
 ongoing
 communication
 exchange
 between
 friends
 and
 family
 by
 becoming
 a
 tool
 to
 help
 maintain
closeness
in
interpersonal
relationships.
 And
make
it
easy
for
your
brand
to
get
plotted
on
clients’
social
graphs
by
ensuring
that
 all
one‐click
options
supporting
social
relationship
marketing
are
enabled‐‐‐Google
Friend
 Connect
and
the
Facebook
Like
button
and
box
for
a
start. .24.
  25. 25. image: ismh_ conclusion In
 the
 mobile
 e‐commerce
 ecosystem
 we
 see
 innovative
 formats
for
delivering
content,
unique
mobile
consumer
digital
 proclivities,
 and
 new
 on‐the‐go
 digital
 information
 rituals,
 needs
and
desires.
 Together
 these
 trends
 encourage
 anyone
 seeking
 to
 communicate
on
mobile
platforms
to
reflect
on
which
modes
 of
mobile
engagement
they
are
seeking
to
drive,
how
portable
 technologies
 and
 media
 fit
 into
 the
 digital
 cultural
 configurations,
 communities,
 and
 mLifestyles
 of
 their
 target
 markets,
and
why
mobile
matters
to
consumers,
clients,
and
 campaigns. .25.
  26. 26. image: Daniel Y. Go references 1. On‐demand
webinar
sponsored
by
DigitalCement.com
and
produced
by
MarketingProfs.com
 available
at:
www.
marketingprofs.com/marketing/online‐seminars/273 2. R2
Integrated
Mobile
Marketing
Survey.
2010
www.r2integrated.com/Portals/21/PDFs/ Mobile_Survey.pdf 3. Jeremy
Owyang,
2010
Altimeter
Report:
The
18
Use
Cases
of
Social
CRM
www.
web‐strategist.com/.../ altimeter‐report‐the‐18‐use‐cases‐of‐social‐crm‐the‐new‐rules‐of‐relationship‐management/ 4. Chris
Thorp.
“On
the
Horizon
of
a
Real‐time
Networked
Society”
2010.
www.
slideshare.net/jaggeree/ realtime 5. The
New
York
Times.
www.
nytimes.com/2008/08/24/business/yourmoney/24every.html 6. AARP
Does
the
iPad
Have
Senior
Appeal?
‐
AARP
Bulletin
Today
22
April
2010.
www.
aarp.org/ technology/innovations/.../iPad_Senior_Appeal.html 7. According
to
Pew
2010
figures.
www.
brighthand.com/default.asp?newsID=16797&news=Cell+phone +Mobile+Twitter+Video+Pictures+Statistics+Survey+Pew 8. See
www.
bizreport.com/2010/01/older_generations_getting_to_grips_with_text_messaging.html 9. According
to
JP
Morgan
report
mm.
jpmorgan.com/stp/t/c.do?i=E8283‐ B8&u=a_p*d_423260.pdf*h_2tvncakf. 10.
See
blog.
return2sender.ie/.../New‐Statistics‐Men‐dominate‐mobile‐web‐browsing.aspx 11. 
According
to
Orange
2010
Digital
Media
Index
www.
allbusiness.com/technology/software.../ 14264412‐1.html 12.
According
to
Myxer
Females
download
twice
as
much
mobile
content
www.
 fiercemobilecontent.com/.../myxer...download.../2010‐05‐10 13.
According
to
Orange,
men
watch
more
mobile
television
ipcarrier.
blogspot.com/.../orange‐uk‐study‐ women‐send‐more.html
 14.
See
blog.
nielsen.com/...mobile/for‐social‐networking‐women‐use‐mobile‐more‐than‐men/ 15.
Orange
mobile
network's
Digital
Media
Index
2010.
cf
note
11. 16.
Women
take,
tag,
and
share
more
digital
photos
than
men
do,
which
is
why
Kodak
calls
mom
the
 chief
memory
officer
for
the
family.
cf
note
13
also
see
Kodak
VP
interview
www.businesswire.com/.../ Jeffrey‐Hayzlett‐Chief‐Marketing‐Officer‐VP‐Kodak 17.
comScore
review
of
the
fastest
growing
categories
of
mobile
apps
www.
comscore.com/ Press_Events/Press_Releases/2010/6/Social_Networking_Ranks_as_Fastest‐ Growing_Mobile_Content_Category
 18.
Buzz
about
iPad
as
laptop
replacement
for
business
travelers:
Web
2.0:
Have
iPad,
Will
Travel
‐‐
 InformationWeek
www.
informationweek.com/news/software/.../showArticle.jhtml? . 26 .
  27. 27. 9. According
to
JP
Morgan
report
https://mm.jpmorgan.com/stp/t/c.do?i=E8283‐ B8&u=a_p*d_423260.pdf*h_2tvncakf. 10.
blog.return2sender.ie/.../New‐Statistics‐Men‐dominate‐mobile‐web‐browsing.aspx 11. 
According
to
Orange
2010
Digital
Media
Index
www.allbusiness.com/technology/software.../ 14264412‐1.html 12.
According
to
Myxer
Females
download
twice
as
much
mobile
content
 www.fiercemobilecontent.com/.../myxer...download.../2010‐05‐10 13.
According
to
Orange,
men
watch
more
mobile
television
ipcarrier.blogspot.com/.../orange‐uk‐ study‐women‐send‐more.html
 14.
blog.nielsen.com/...mobile/for‐social‐networking‐women‐use‐mobile‐more‐than‐men/ 15.
Orange
mobile
network's
Digital
Media
Index
2010.
cf
note
11. 16.
Women
take,
tag,
and
share
more
digital
photos
than
men
do,
which
is
why
Kodak
calls
mom
 the
chief
memory
officer
for
the
family.
cf
note
13
also
see
Kodak
VP
interview
 www.businesswire.com/.../Jeffrey‐Hayzlett‐Chief‐Marketing‐Officer‐VP‐Kodak 17.
comScore
review
of
the
fastest
growing
categories
of
mobile
apps
http:// www.comscore.com/Press_Events/Press_Releases/2010/6/ Social_Networking_Ranks_as_Fastest‐Growing_Mobile_Content_Category
 18.
Buzz
about
iPad
as
laptop
replacement
for
business
travelers:
Web
2.0:
Have
iPad,
Will
Travel
‐‐
 InformationWeek
www.informationweek.com/news/software/.../showArticle.jhtml? 19.
Gold
rush
on
paid
apps.
www.
emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1007591 20.
Revenue
from
US
paid
apps
represents
$1.6B
at
present,
industry
analysts
at
the
Yankee
Group
at
 forecast
that
figure
will
reach
$11B
by
2013. 21.
Greystripe
Mobile
Advertising
Insights
Report:
The
iPhone
Mom
Q3
2009
www.
greystripe.com/ wp.../GreystripeAdvertisingInsightsQ309.pdf 22.
Pew
"The
New
Demography
of
American
Motherhood"
2010.
pewsocialtrends.org/assets/pdf/ 754‐new‐demography‐of‐motherhood.pdf 23.
See
for
example,
www.millennialmoms.com/MillennialMom101.pdf,
and
a
recent
study
by
 BIGresearch
conducted
for
The
Retail
Advertising
and
Marketing
Association.
 marketingvox.com/retailers‐can‐lure‐moms‐with‐social‐media‐free‐stuff‐046001/
as
well
as
 BabyCenter’s
2009
survey
of
25,000
women,
“The
21st
Century
Mom
Report”
www.
 emarketer.com/PressRelease.aspx?R=1007531 24.
My
ePaper
“Marketing
to
Millennial
Moms”
scribd.
com/doc/33894068/Marketing‐to‐Millennial‐ Moms 25.
cf
note
21 26.Razorfish
FEED
Report
2009
“digital
primacy”
Razorfish
2009
FEED
Report
www.
adpulp.com/ archives/2009/11/razorfish_2009.php 27.
Thank
you
to
Mark
W.
Schaefer
for
asking
this
question
on
his
amazing
{grow}
blog:
 businessesgrow.com/blog/ 28.
Michael
Lazerow
“Branded
Applications:
Holy
Grail
or
Graveyard?”
blogs.
imediaconnection.com/ BlogDetail.aspx?BlogID=223 29.
For
an
example
of
the
mobile
phone
as
loyalty
card:
impactmobile.com/news/coca‐cola‐turns‐ mobile‐pone‐into‐loyalty‐card‐with‐airbonus 30.
See
comments
by
Rob
Beecroft
of
Ad.IQ
in
MarketingProfs
whitepaper
“Mobile
Marketing
 Success
Stories”
www.
ingagenetworks.com/docs/marketingprofs‐mobilemarketing.pdf
also
see
 A.
M.
Al‐alak
Basheer,
“Mobile
Marketing:
Examining
the
Impact
of
Trust”
International
Journal
of
 Business
and
Management
(2010)
www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ijbm/article/view/4643/4419 31.
For
more
on
the
New
Balance
video
365
iPhone
app
campaign:
psfk.
com/2010/03/new‐ balance‐365‐campaign‐fuses‐content‐and‐commerce.html 32.
For
more
information
on
Mount
Sinai
“text
in
the
city”
textinthecity.
posterous.com
For
more
 about
Johnson
and
Johnson’s
“text
4
baby”
campaign
see
text4baby.
com 33.
Bass
Pro
mobile
app
is
described
at
mobilemarketer.
com/cms/news/commerce/6457/.html .27.
  28. 28. image: B G about the author Sidneyeve
Matrix,
PhD.
 Queen's
National
Scholar,
Media
&
Film
@
Queen's
University





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