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Behavioural event interviewing   science or religion Behavioural event interviewing science or religion Presentation Transcript

  • Behavioural Event Interviewing: Science or Religion NZPsS Annual Conference Rotorua - July 2010 Keith McGregor Personnel Psychology NZ Ltd www.ppnz.com 21/07/2010 1 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • 21/07/2010 2 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Structured Interviews 1. Base questions on a person spec from a job analysis 2. Ask exactly the same questions of each candidate 3. Limit prompting, follow-up questioning and elaboration 4. Use better types of questions, namely; - future situational questions (What would you do if ...?) - past experience questions (Tell us about a time ..?) - work history questions (What experience with ...?) - job knowledge, competency questions (How do you?) Campion, M., A, D. Palmer, K, et al. (1997). "A Review of Structure in the Selection Interview." Personnel Psychology 50: 655-702. 21/07/2010 3 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Structured Interviews 5. Use longer interviews or more questions 6. Withhold access to ancillary information (application forms, resumes, test scores, etc.) 7. Don’t allow questions from candidates until after the interview 8. Rate each answer using multiple scales 9. Use detailed anchored rating scales 10. Take detailed notes 21/07/2010 4 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Structured Interviews 11. Use multiple interviewers on panels 12. Use the same interviewers across all candidates 13. Don’t discuss candidates or answers between interviews 14. Provide extensive interview training 15. Use statistical methods to analyse the scores 21/07/2010 5 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Hypothetical Situational Questions • Identify required competencies • Obtain examples of critical incidents • Create a scoring template • Score the answers • Appoint the person with the best score • “What would you do if you discovered a co- worker was planning to leak information?” 21/07/2010 6 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Behavioural Event Questions • Identify required competencies • Write questions focusing on past behaviours • Situation – Behaviour – Outcome - Motivation • Create a scoring schedule • Score the answers • Appoint the person with the best score • “Can you tell us about a time when….” 21/07/2010 7 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Question Sent To Candidate Customer Service Orientation: Tell us about a time when you recognised that more was required than the customer (internal or external) asked for and what you then went on to do. Tell us of a situation when you have had to say ‘no’ to a customer or client, what did you do? (Taken from a 1996 questionnaire sent to a candidate prior to interview.) 21/07/2010 8 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Inconsistent Application 70% based their questions on the person specification 14% used ad-lib questions. 43% described using a set format 70% included at least some generic questions, such as describing strengths and weaknesses, that were not specifically job related. 28% had complete freedom in the questioning process 22% who stayed with the set questions. The balance used a semi-structured approach. 52% indicated they used some form of rating. Taylor, P., Y. Keelty, et al. (2002). "Evolving Personnel Selection Practices in New Zealand Organisations and Recruitment Firms." New Zealand Journal of Psychology 31(1): 8-18. 21/07/2010 9 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Reasons for Variation • Interviewers may be unaware of the research • needs for power or autonomy may be frustrated by the structured approach • Interview may become a boring, monotonous exercise • Applicants may be alienated by the formality of the process or may find the process frustrating • Process may be at odds with the values and beliefs of the organisation • There may be financial or time constraints • Applicants perceive both the organisation and interview more positively when unstructured or semi-structured. van der Zee, K. I., A. B. Bakker, et al. (2002). "Why are structured interviews so rarely used in personnel selection?" Journal of Applied Psychology. 87(1): 176-184. 21/07/2010 10 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Coaching Formal coaching and preparation for public service workers scheduled to attend a structured interview - Improvement in interview performance - More favourable impression with interviewers - Correlated with performance on the job A de facto IQ test - candidates demonstrating ability to learn and apply the taught skills Maurer, T. J., J. M. Solamon, et al. (2001). "Interviewee Coaching, Preparation Strategies, and Response Strategies in Relation to Performance in Situational Employment Interviews: An extension of Maurer, Solamon, and Troxtel (1998)." Journal of Applied Psychology 86(4): 709-717. Maurer, T. J. and J. M. Solamon (2006). "The Science And Practice Of A Structured Employment Interview Coaching Program." Personnel Psychology 59(2): 433-456. 21/07/2010 11 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Impression Management Assertive tactics - ingratiation, self-promotion Defensive tactics - excuses, justifications, apologies Applicants search environment for cues and tailor their self presentation to the situation, e.g. cues inherent in the type of question being asked Experience based questions can evoke self promotion tactics such as claiming responsibility for successes or enhancing responsibilities Situational questions may lead to ingratiation by supplying answers likely to appeal to the interviewer Ellis, A. P. J., B. J. West, et al. (2002). "The Use of Impression Management Tactics in Structured Interviews: A Function of Question Type?" Journal of Applied Psychology 87(6): 1200-1208. 21/07/2010 12 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • The ‘Russia House’ Dilemma “Okay? We show Bluebird the shopping list and he turns out to be their asset not ours. Have I considered that possibility? Ned, day and night I have considered little else. If Bluebird is, if the girl is, if Barley is, if all or any of the players is less than strictly kosher, the shopping list will shine a very bright light up the anal orifice of the United States of America. …It will show the Sovs what we don’t know and how we don’t know it … Cleverly analysed, the shopping list can show them the gaps in our intelligence gathering machinery” John Le Carre, ‘The Russia House’ 21/07/2010 13 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Weapon of Choice “A clever psychopath can present such a well- rounded picture of a perfect job candidate that even seasoned interviewers" Hare, R., D (1993). Without Conscience: The Disturbing World of the Psychopaths Among Us. New York, The Guilford Press. “Questions are a short course for the subject on how to lie to us” “We cannot trust information we have to solicit” Avinoam Sapir (1988) Laboratory for Scientific Interrogation. Personal Communication. 21/07/2010 14 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Johari Window SELF Things we Things we KNOW DO NOT KNOW about ourselves about ourselves Things others PUBLIC BLIND KNOW about us ARENA SPOT OTHERS FACADE UNKNOWN Things others DO NOT KNOW about us 21/07/2010 15 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Interview Implications Will not discuss Will discuss because they openly are unaware e.g. gender bias Will not discuss Will not discuss because they do because they not want you to are unaware know e.g. e.g. self procrastination sabotage 21/07/2010 16 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Values and Attitudes Unstructured interviewing was more effective than structured interviewing in identifying counterproductive work behaviours. Allowing freedom to explore aspects of the interviewee’s experience and attitudes produced more valid assessments of personality traits and produced more information with fewer personality related questions than did interviews which were highly structured. The degree of structure rather than the type of questions was the differentiating factor. Blackman, M. C. and D. C. Funder (2002). "Effective Interview Practices for Accurately Assessing Counterproductive Traits." International Journal of Selection and Assessment 10(1&2): 109-116. 21/07/2010 17 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • What is Being Measured? Conventionally structured interviews (focusing on credentials and achievements, descriptions of experience and self evaluative information such as likes, dislikes, strengths and weaknesses) were assessing social skills and temperament. Behaviour structured interviews, (focusing on technical knowledge and behaviour description) were assessing general mental ability and work knowledge. Moscoso, S. (2000). "Selection Interview: A Review of Validity Evidence, Adverse Impact and Applicant Reactions." International Journal of Selection and Assessment 8(4): 237-247. 21/07/2010 18 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Counterintuitive Hypothesis Is increased validity of structured interview due to higher reliability? How many unstructured interviews equate to validity of one structured interview? “Perhaps the best interpretation of the mixed results in this study as that they indicate that there is evidence that is countertheoretical to the prevailing beliefs about the structured interview and that additional research should be conducted to understand this issue more fully.” (Bugger!) Schmidt, F.L., & Zimmerman, R.D. (2004). A Counterintuitive Hypothesis About Employment Interview Validity and Some Supporting Evidence. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89(3), 553-561 21/07/2010 19 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Six Pieces of Paper RELIABILITY Police officers need to be supportive, dependable and to make themselves available to other police officers. Please describe a situation where you had to keep going without quitting. What was the situation and the demands put upon you? What exactly did you do? What did you do to keep yourself going? How did you support others? What was the result? “These initial results show that the six-page competency- based application form designed for police officer recruitment obtains quite similar results to other more expensive, labour-intensive selection processes.” Lamsdale, C., R. Wood, et al. (1999). "An Alternative to an Assessment Centre on Six Pieces of Paper?" International Journal of Selection and Assessment 7(3): 170-176. 21/07/2010 20 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Structured Interview Problems • Job analysis seldom evidence based and seldom mention environmental factors • Narrow scope of inquiry – may miss key behaviours • Trying to quantify a subjective judgement • Unnatural and artificial • Everyone is different • Stressful (unethical?) 21/07/2010 21 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Does the Past Predict The Future? • Theory states that past behaviour is the best predictor of future behaviour • But - we seldom have access to past behaviour • We only have access to current behaviour • Body language is unreliable • Only verbal behaviour is reliable 21/07/2010 22 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Described versus Demonstrated Behaviour • Described behaviour - what they talk about • Demonstrated behaviour - how they talk about it • Demonstrated behaviour is the most reliable indicator 21/07/2010 23 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • What Is Demonstrated? David, can you please give us an example of a situation where you had to deal with an angry customer, explain what you did and what outcome resulted. That’s easy. When I was working as a salesperson at Gifts- For-All a customer came in with this ridiculous complaint. I mean it is amazing what some people expect. Anyway, I calmed her down and apologised for what had happened. I told her it was a manufacturing error, it wasn’t really but that always sounds good. I replaced her purchase and gave her a discount voucher and she was really happy. I thought it was a good outcome and my boss said I had shown excellent customer service skills. 21/07/2010 24 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Structure is Essential • Unstructured interviewing is NOT the solution • Elicits irrelevant information • Relies on ‘gut feel’ • Decisions difficult to justify – “his eyes were too close together” • The question is not ‘structured’ versus ‘unstructured’ but what kind of structure 21/07/2010 25 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Purpose of an Assessment 1. To enable us to predict how a candidate is most likely to behave on the job 2. To use our prediction to guide the selection decision 21/07/2010 26 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Objective of an Interview The primary objective of the interview is to obtain sufficient valid, unbiased behavioural data to enable an accurate prediction of how the person will behave in the workplace. 21/07/2010 27 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • “She Interviewed Well….” • We are not interested in how they ‘perform’ in the interview • We are not looking for anything - we are looking to see what is there • Must leave a legally robust ‘audit trail’ showing: – what information was obtained, – how it was analysed and – how it related to potential on-the-job behaviour 21/07/2010 28 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Natural Skills As a generalisation, most people are natural interviewers How would your partner / relative go as a central city bus driver? What questions would you ask at a party to see if someone would fit into your work environment? 21/07/2010 29 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • We Predict By Matching… With the known requirements of the role How the person normally behaves 21/07/2010 30 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • The Key Elements Job Candidate Knowledge Knowledge Skills Skills Attitudes Attitudes Predicted on-the-job performance 21/07/2010 31 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • KSA’s (Bloom’s Taxonomy) Knowledge (Cognitive) – the what Skills (Psychomotor) – the how Attitude (Affective) – the will For every inch training technology gains, selection technology loses a mile - don’t waste time assessing things you can train 21/07/2010 32 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • ‘Natural Selection’ Humans have a natural tendency to select OUT rather than select IN We really want the candidate to be good but when all the lights go red it’s all over 21/07/2010 33 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • ‘Incompetency’ Profile The norm is to use a competency profile - what we looking for. These are often generic and not based on empirical evidence – people have usually ‘discussed’ them into existence Ideally, the competency profile should include an ‘Incompetency’ profile – behaviours shown by people who have failed in the role. 21/07/2010 34 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • The ‘Pure’ Interview We do not need to know what the job is in order to do the interview. A good interview will produce two main pieces of information: – what motivates and de-motivates the candidate – what competencies they have Armed with this information it should then be possible to predict how the candidate will behave in any given job 21/07/2010 35 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • The Theoretical Basis Ivan Petrovich Pavlov Burrhus Frederic Skinner Classical/Respondent Operant/Instrumental 21/07/2010 36 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Reinforcing and Aversive Stimuli We have two poles Things we move Things we move TOWARDS AWAY FROM DETAIL? PEOPLE? CONFLICT? STATUS? 21/07/2010 37 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Assessing Personality We are unable to read other people’s minds. All we can do is observe their behaviour. Personality can therefore be viewed as the: • Long term (stable) • Probability (predictable) • of Specific (definable) • Behaviour (observable) 21/07/2010 38 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Assessing Personality There are no absolutes in human behaviour. A person may need the company of others most of the time but still need time alone To assess ‘personality’ we need to be able to assign probabilities to the behaviours We need to recognise that the interview is an unnatural environment – the candidate has no competition, they are being evaluated 21/07/2010 39 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Sampling Behaviour • Sampling is a cornerstone of science • To assess personality we need an unbiased sample of behaviours • The sampling process is systematic not selective • Secondary school, for example, is simply a starting point, it has no special significance • Anything can be included – sports, part time jobs, research projects, trips 21/07/2010 40 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Interview Structure POSITIVES NEGATIVES SKILLS POSITIVES NEGATIVES SKILLS POSITIVES NEGATIVES SKILLS 21/07/2010 41 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Getting Started Start with very broad, open questions: ‘Just to get the ball rolling, tell us a bit about yourself.’ - Do they seek clarification? - What do they talk about? - How long do they spend on each topic? - How organised or orderly are they? - Are there any ‘weirdies’? - How long are their replies - long / medium / short? 21/07/2010 42 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Interview Structure Work through entire academic and work history: • ‘Going back to the dim dark past, what were some of the ‘highs’ and ‘lows’ of your last couple of years at school?’ • ‘After school you worked at Grange Ltd. What was that like?’ • ‘What prompted you to move on?’ • ‘While you were with Pastrycooks International, what aspects gave you the most job satisfaction?’ 21/07/2010 43 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Drawing Out The Values ‘Brilliant’ ... ‘Great’ ... What was it ‘Good’ ... like working ‘Okay’ ... there? ‘Interesting’ ... ‘Awful’ ‘Ummm’ 21/07/2010 44 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Probe the Adjectives Everyone speaks a different language Never assume you know how they interpret words like ‘challenging’ or ‘awful’ ‘When you say ‘awful’, what sort of things are you thinking of?’ 21/07/2010 45 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Interpretable Information • ‘Interpretable’ information reveals values and attitudes • The facts of the situation are irrelevant • Consider the responses of two people who attended the same Outward Bound course: 1. “Terrible, disorganised, lousy food” 2. “Amazing, I learned so much about myself” 21/07/2010 46 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Laddering Laddering Up (Why? Why? Why?) What was that job like? “Great, I worked in a team” As opposed to? “Working on my own” Which do you prefer? “Being part of a team” Because? “I know I can get help if I need it” As opposed to? “Having to work things out for myself” You prefer help because? “I struggle to make decisions” Laddering Down (How? How? How?) You mentioned helping others. How do you do that? “I always seem to know when people need help” Which you achieve by? “I guess I am always looking around to see what is going on” 21/07/2010 47 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Fly on the Wall Can you get a fly-on-the-wall picture of the candidate in the workplace? How did you find that role? Oh, great Great in what way? I was the youngest rep in the history of the company And what did you love getting your teeth into? Winning customers of the other reps, that was a real buzz 21/07/2010 48 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Fly (cringing) on the Wall What about the frustrations, if something was going to get up Dave’s nose what would it be? Some of the other reps Go on? Oh, they used to play these stupid tricks, in the end I just refused to talk to them Anything else apart from that? Some of the customers could be difficult, I think basically they were just plain thick 21/07/2010 49 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Never Sell Before Deciding • Candidates are coached to try to get the interviewer talking to gain cues about how to respond. • Give away nothing until the end of the interview. • If they want to know more about the job, ask them to give you their best guess. • “Just so we don’t double up, how about you tell us what you think the key points are and we can fill in the gaps.” 21/07/2010 50 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Notetaking Write as close to word-for-word as possible • Ensures accurate analysis • Wards off subsequent challenges • EEO fair • Allows the candidate to relax • Gives interviewer time to review • Prevents interview ‘white-out’ 21/07/2010 51 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Assessing Skills and Abilities • Drill down into the detail • Use ‘closed’ or directive questions • Get very specific information • Ask ‘dumb’ questions • If inexperienced solicit ‘best guess’ 21/07/2010 52 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • The CV contains the Questions Read carefully through the C.V. and note any activities which are close to those you require. Use those as the basis for skill and ability questions. “I see here you set up a chart of accounts. What on earth is a chart of accounts, how do you set those up?” 21/07/2010 53 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • ‘Unconscious’ Non-Answers Sam, could you please elaborate on your role and your job with TAP Inc., specifically the organisational climate re-engineering project. My role was as an internal consultant employed by TAP and the role extended straight across the organisation. I had responsibility for the non-government accounts. I worked with the training department itself. The team was directly responsible for facilitating organisational change. We were involved at the invitation of other departments. The intention was that any unit undergoing change would call us in to help. In some cases the bosses said we had to be involved. We tried to be involved as early as possible and worked in a facilitation role. The idea was for us to be involved as soon as people recognised they needed help. We identified the problem, the real problem, and suggested solutions and in some cases we were involved in the implementation. 21/07/2010 54 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • What did Sam actually do? Could you give us examples - what were you involved in the whole time? And what were some of the smaller activities? How was consistency achieved across the organisation? Our aim was to achieve consistency across the organisation by restructure and climate change. It was reorganised into customer groups. We lost about 200 people across the whole company. For the climate change we analysed the existing situation. We prepared an analysis plan, we read up on similar programmes, we looked at the language, we held focus groups and we carried out surveys. We used a number of different methods to gather the information we needed. There were 6 of us working on the project. I was the team leader for the data management. We developed a picture of the existing climate and from here we looked at where we wanted to be. 21/07/2010 55 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • ‘Unconscious’ Non-Answers Sam, could you please elaborate on your role and your job with TAP Inc., specifically the organisational climate re-engineering project. My role was as an internal consultant employed by TAP and the role extended straight across the organisation. I had responsibility for the non-government accounts. I worked with the training department itself. The team was directly responsible for facilitating organisational change. We were involved at the invitation of other departments. The intention was that any unit undergoing change would call us in to help. In some cases the bosses said we had to be involved. We tried to be involved as early as possible and worked in a facilitation role. The idea was for us to be involved as soon as people recognised they needed help. We identified the problem, the real problem, and suggested solutions and in some cases we were involved in the implementation. 21/07/2010 56 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • What did Sam actually do? Could you give us examples - what were you involved in the whole time? And what were some of the smaller activities? How was consistency achieved across the organisation? Our aim was to achieve consistency across the organisation by restructure and climate change. It was reorganised into customer groups. We lost about 200 people across the whole company. For the climate change we analysed the existing situation. We prepared an analysis plan, we read up on similar programmes, we looked at the language, we held focus groups and we carried out surveys. We used a number of different methods to gather the information we needed. There were 6 of us working on the project. I was the team leader for the data management. We developed a picture of the existing climate and from here we looked at where we wanted to be. 21/07/2010 57 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Analysing the Results • Avoid making a decision straight after the interview - allow time for the face to fade. • Read the notes through at least three times. • Write out or highlight all the positive and negative comments. • Sort the comments into natural groupings - ‘people’, ‘learning’, ‘status’, etc. • Prepare a competency report and a prediction of on-the-job behaviour. 21/07/2010 58 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Q-Sort Positives and Negatives Being made prefect Not being listened to by pupils Teachers giving me praise Missing out on 1st XV selection Winning the 400m prize Practical jokes by childish sales reps Being the youngest customer service rep in history of Not being invited to Board company dinner Winning the top sales prize Manager trying to tell me how to do my job Winning customers off the other reps Customers kept cancelling orders Working for an elite company Having to explain things several times to clients 21/07/2010 59 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Interpreting the Results • Work on the obvious - don’t read in things that are not there. • Be hypercritical - if they can’t suppress negative traits in a 40 minute interview they won’t stand a chance on the job. • Focus on the behaviours demonstrated in the interview - sarcasm, criticism, talking about people, money, results, etc. 21/07/2010 60 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Reporting the Results Always prepare a written prediction of how the person will behave in the workplace, even if it is just for yourself. Dig it out six months later and see how close you were. If you are assessing against competencies use the data you have collected as the basis for the assessment. Have someone else review your analysis to ensure consistency 21/07/2010 61 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Competency Report Competency Assessment Evidence Teambuilding Not achieved Referred to teams once in 60 minutes. Resented team activities at school and in first job Technical Knowledge Achieved Gave in-depth answers, reads widely and has advanced knowledge Awareness of Others Not Achieved On five occasions referred to people as ‘half-wits’ and idiots. Made six comments about the trouble people had put him to 21/07/2010 62 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Summary Report Positives Attention and support from others, feeling valued, being listened to, pleasant working conditions, freedom to make his own decisions, relaxed environment Negatives Repetitive, boring work, managers, people of high rank, education system, bureaucracy, being told what to do, co-workers General Initially impressed as open and responsive with good Summary knowledge. Successfully completed three major projects. As interview progressed started criticising and blaming others. Highly judgemental and confrontational Predicted He will begin well and have some early wins but then performance start ‘falling out’ with managers and co-workers. Will resign and blame others for his problems Recommend- Suitable for genuine, short term contract but not for ation permanent employment. 21/07/2010 63 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Light Reading Blackman MC, Funder DC. (2002). Effective Interview Practices for Accurately Assessing Counterproductive Traits. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 10, 109-116. Campion MA, Palmer DK, Campion JE (1997) A Review of Structure in the Selection Interview. Personnel Psychology, 50, 655-702 Thompson, D. W.: Managing People: Influencing Behaviour. St Louis, Miss, 1978, C.V. Mosby. Pp 101-118 21/07/2010 64 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • Finally – Getting to the Truth 21/07/2010 65 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD
  • About PPNZ Personnel Psychology NZ Ltd provides a comprehensive range of industrial and organisational psychology services. • Specialist training (e.g. ‘The Psychology of Management’, ‘Advanced Interview Skills’ and ‘Managing Organisational Change’) • In-depth executive appointment screening • Individual psychological assessment and counselling for executives • Mentoring, coaching and supervision • Organisational climate surveys and stress audits • Psychometric test development ( e.g. Selector PA, Career Step, E Profiler) • Safety management The director, Keith McGregor, is an industrial psychologist based in Lower Hutt, New Zealand. His background includes twelve years as an occupational psychologist in the Royal New Zealand Air Force and twenty in private practice working with a wide range of private and public sector organisations in New Zealand and Australia. 21/07/2010 66 PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY NZ LTD