Making It Count WI

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Making It Count WI

  1. 1. Making It Count Keith Curry Lance Consultant, RSL Research Group Tel. 303 466 1860 - Mobile 720 232 5866 E-mail [email_address] - Website: http://www.RSLresearch.com the strongest messages, the latest facts, the best sources … and your library’s story
  2. 2. Outline <ul><li>The Messages: what we know about public libraries </li></ul><ul><li>The Facts: data that backs it up </li></ul><ul><li>The Sources: Where to find it </li></ul><ul><li>Your Story: How to communicate it … </li></ul>
  3. 3. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops. </li></ul><ul><li>Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity. </li></ul><ul><li>For YOU … The library is what you want it to be. </li></ul><ul><li>A community destination for all. </li></ul>
  4. 4. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops. Libraries … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help children do well in school </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support lifelong learning </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Public libraries help children do well in school <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><li>Why participating in summer reading program makes a difference </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading gets better when you practice it. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Without SRPs, kids lose reading gains over summer. (Especially true for disadvantaged kids.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SRP kids more likely to read well than non-SRP kids. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SRP kids read better than those who go to camp. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>SRP kids who visited library and did free reading gained more than those in a traditional language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>arts summer program. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Public libraries help children do well in school <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do PL Summer Reading Programs Impact Student Achievement? (Dominican’s ‘06-07 IMLS project—in progress) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Making a Splash With Summer Reading , SLJ , Jan ‘03. See: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=articlePrint&articleID=CA266700 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Study: Summer Reading Helps Students , SLJ , Feb ‘02. See: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=articlePrint&articleID=CA192969 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Role of PLs in Children’s Literacy Development: An Evaluation Report . PA Library Association, ‘01. See: http://www.statelibrary.state.pa.us/libraries/lib/libraries/Role%20of%20Libraries.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Johnson, Peter. Building Effective Programs for Summer Learning. US Dept of Education, ‘00. See: http:// www.ed.gov/americareads/sum_build.doc . </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Public libraries help children do well in school <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Report number of programs for preschool age children—especially story times and outreach to day care centers—and attendance at such programs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Report summer reading program statistics. Also track impact, if possible. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quote parents about the value of these programs. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Public libraries support lifelong learning <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chicago PL’s Austin Irving branch </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In partnership with Wright College, serves: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>6,500 regular credit students, AND </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>6,000 adult education students </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Children’s librarian visits every classroom in every school; partnerships w/school librarians promote all children’s services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>75-90 parents attend story time with kids each week </li></ul></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Public libraries support lifelong learning <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The top 3 topics for “free choice learning” are: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Health issues, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Spiritual/personal growth, and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Current events. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Public libraries support lifelong learning <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Engaged Library: Chicago Stories of Community Building (Urban Libraries Council (ULC, ‘06), See: http://www.urbanlibraries.org/files/ULC_PFSC_Engaged_0206.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnerships for Free Choice Learning: PLs, Museums, and Public Broadcasters (Urban Institute, ULC, ‘03) See: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410661_partnerships_for_free_choice_learning.pdf </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Public libraries support lifelong learning <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Report numbers of library programs—especially those offered in collaboration with other community organizations—that encourage LL and attendance at programs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In annual user survey or focus group interviews, ask about LL uses of library collections & services. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Quote users about library’s role in their LL. </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity. Libraries … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Open doors of opportunity for disenfranchised communities </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Public libraries open doors of opportunity … <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From Urban Libraries Council ( Making Cities Stronger , 07): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Brooklyn Reads to Babies (early literacy campaign in 6 languages) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Providence Ready to Learn Partnership for Parents (early literacy training) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Memphis Training Wheels (mobile children’s services) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Public libraries open doors of opportunity … <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From MDRC (Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, ‘01): </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Strong library literacy programs help to encourage adult students to persevere to meet their goals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From Counting on Results (LRS, ‘01) : </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Basic literacy: 42% of these patrons became citizens. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Business/career : 36% of these patrons explored business opportunities, started or developed business. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Public libraries open doors of opportunity … <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Making Cities Stronger : PL Contributionss to Economic Development (ULC, ’07) See: http://www.urbanlibraries.org/files/making_cities_stronger.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>&quot;I Did It for Myself“ Studying Efforts to Increase Adult Learner Persistence in Library Literacy Programs (MDRC, ’01) See: http://www.mdrc.org/publications/106/execsum.html </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counting on Results : New Tools for Outcome-Based Evaluation of PLs (LRS, ‘99-’01) See: http:// www.lrs.org/CoR.asp </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Public libraries open doors of opportunity … <ul><ul><li>Tools: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>PL Geographic Database (PLGDB) See: http:// www.geolib.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>LRS Community Analysis Scan Form See: http:// www.lrs.org/asp_public/ca_form.asp </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Public libraries open doors of opportunity … <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Map recent or specific circulation data to learn who is and isn’t using your library. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do a community analysis. (Use PLGDB & LRS community scan form.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publicize programs on preparing for GED exam, selecting college, starting home-based business. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interview key user groups in your legal service area (e.g., students, adult learners, small business owners). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Design outreach efforts to reach non-users. </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>For YOU … The library is what you want it to be. Libraries ... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Will get you through times of no money … </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change people’s lives! </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Public libraries will get you through times of no money … <ul><li>The Facts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public library usage increases when the economy slumps. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>During the 2001 recession, circulation ran 8-9% above what would have normally been expected (ALA, ‘02). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Public libraries will get you through times of no money … <ul><li>The Facts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Public libraries generate a measurable return-on-investment in terms of community development (SLPL, 1998). </li></ul></ul>St Louis PL ’97 budget: $15 Million Opportunity/time costs: $90 million Consumer surplus: $47 million Willingness to pay: $15 million Teacher/caregiver benefits: $13 million Business user benefits: $ 7 million
  21. 21. Public libraries will get you through times of no money … <ul><li>The Facts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overall … public libraries return $6.54 for every $1.00 invested from all sources. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For every $6,448 spent on public libraries from public funding sources (federal, state, and local) … one job is created. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>FL Taxpayer Return-on-Investment study </li></ul></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Public libraries will get you through times of no money … <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Taxpayer Return on Investment Study of FL PLs (‘04) See: http://dlis.dos.state.fl.us/bld/roi/FinalReport.cfm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Economic Hard Times and PL Use Revisited , American Libraries , Aug ‘02, pp. 62-63. See: http://www.ala.org/ala/ors/reports/economichard.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Placing a Value on PL Services (St Louis PL, ‘98) See: http://www.slpl.lib.mo.us/libsrc/restoc.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For more, see the Library Research Service website’s economic impact studies page at: http://www.lrs.org/topics.asp#econ2 </li></ul></ul>
  23. 23. Public libraries will get you through times of no money … <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chart year to year trends for your community, including: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Library’s local income, collection expenditures; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Library visits, circulation, program attendance; </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Labor force participation, unemployment rate. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey businesses that use the library about cost savings. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask users for success stories about how library services helped them find jobs, start businesses. </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Public libraries change people’s lives <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Of general library users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>74% read for pleasure. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>56% learned about a skill, hobby or other interest. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>46% found info needed for school, work or a community group. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>* Facts on this & following slide from Counting on Results (LRS, ‘01) </li></ul>
  25. 25. Public libraries change people’s lives <ul><li>The Facts--continued </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Of all users for libraries that studied specific service responses: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Library as place : 59% found quiet place to think, read, write or study. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Local history/genealogy : 53% made progress researching family histories. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Basic literacy : 36% read to a child or helped a child choose a book. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Public libraries change people’s lives <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perspectives on Outcome-Based Evaluation for Libraries & Museums (IMLS, undated) See: http://www.imls.gov/pubs/pdf/pubobe.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowing What Audiences Learn: Outcomes & Program Planning (IMLS PowerPoint, ‘03) See: http://www.imls.gov/grants/current/ACM-03-fnl.pps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chief Officers of State Library Agencies, Member Profiles (COSLA website) See: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.cosla.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counting on Results : New Tools for Outcome-Based Evaluation of PLs (LRS, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>‘ 99-’01) See: http://www.lrs.org/CoR.asp </li></ul></ul>
  27. 27. Public libraries change people’s lives <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conduct an outcome-based evaluation of a specific program at your library. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conduct an annual user survey to give patrons the opportunity to identify how they have benefited from your library’s services. </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>A community destination for all. Libraries … </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are gateways to the World Wide Web </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridge the Digital Divide </li></ul></ul>
  29. 29. Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><li>From Info Institute (‘06): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>99% provide Internet access. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>83% provide access to licensed databases. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>55% offer digital or virtual reference services. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>41% offer technology training. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>37% offer wireless access. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From Gates (‘03): </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New computers increase user visits, bring many new visitors to libraries. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Includes home-schoolers, travelers, and others who depend on library computers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75% of patrons &quot;ask a librarian&quot; when they need help with library computers. </li></ul></ul>
  30. 30. Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>FSU’s Information Institute (especially PL & Internet project) at http:// www.ii.fsu.edu </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Gates Legacy: What's changed and what's next as librarians work to sustain public access to computers , LJ , ‘03 See: http:// www.libraryjournal.com (search terms: gates legacy) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gates Foundation’s U.S. Libraries Evaluation Reports at: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/UnitedStates/USLibraryProgram/Evaluation/USLibrariesFullReports.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OCLC Programs & Research publications and presentations at: http:// www.oclc.org /research/ </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Report website usage statistics for library catalog, licensed databases, virtual reference, homework help, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publicize profiles of patrons who use online services and how they make a difference. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publicize stories of librarians helping patrons with technology. </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide <ul><li>The Facts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtually all library outlets offer public access computers, and more than 14 million regularly use them. Poor & minority patrons are more likely than others to rely on access (Gates, ‘04). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Libraries in poorer areas, especially rural ones, lag behind more prosperous cities and suburbs; but, E-rate is closing gap (Info Institute, ‘02). </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide <ul><li>The Sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Toward Equality of Access: The Role of Public Libraries in Addressing the Digital Divide (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, ‘04) See: http://www.imls.gov/pubs/pdf/Equality.pdf </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Public Library Internet Services: Impacts on the Digital Divide (Info Institute, FSU, 2002) See: http://www.ii.fsu.edu/getProjectDetail.cfm?pageID=9&ProjectID=7 </li></ul></ul>
  34. 34. Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide <ul><li>Your Story: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Report availability of library computers (especially for poor, low education, minorities, older adults). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Report how patrons benefit from more or better access, thanks to E-rate. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Survey or interview library users to determine: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>extent of their reliance on library access to Internet, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>computer user demographics, and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>reasons for Internet use (e.g., educational, economic, recreational). </li></ul></ul></ul>
  35. 35. What we know about public libraries <ul><li>One more time … </li></ul><ul><li>Public libraries are … </li></ul><ul><li>Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops. </li></ul><ul><li>Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity. </li></ul><ul><li>For YOU … The library is what you want it to be. </li></ul><ul><li>A community destination for all. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Where to turn for help … <ul><li>State Data Coordinators (state library agencies) </li></ul><ul><li>State Data Centers </li></ul><ul><li>Nearest library school </li></ul><ul><li>Centers for library research </li></ul><ul><li>ALA Office for Research & Statistics </li></ul><ul><li>Federal agencies: IMLS, NCES, NCLIS </li></ul><ul><li>Links to all of the above (and more) at http://www.LRS.org </li></ul>Wisconsin Public Libraries : Raising Your Community’s Net Worth

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