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Making It Count WI Making It Count WI Presentation Transcript

  • Making It Count Keith Curry Lance Consultant, RSL Research Group Tel. 303 466 1860 - Mobile 720 232 5866 E-mail [email_address] - Website: http://www.RSLresearch.com the strongest messages, the latest facts, the best sources … and your library’s story
  • Outline
    • The Messages: what we know about public libraries
    • The Facts: data that backs it up
    • The Sources: Where to find it
    • Your Story: How to communicate it …
  • What we know about public libraries
    • Public libraries are …
    • Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops.
    • Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity.
    • For YOU … The library is what you want it to be.
    • A community destination for all.
  • What we know about public libraries
    • Public libraries are …
    • Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops. Libraries …
      • Help children do well in school
      • Support lifelong learning
  • Public libraries help children do well in school
    • The Facts:
    • Why participating in summer reading program makes a difference
      • Reading gets better when you practice it.
      • Without SRPs, kids lose reading gains over summer. (Especially true for disadvantaged kids.)
      • SRP kids more likely to read well than non-SRP kids.
      • SRP kids read better than those who go to camp.
      • SRP kids who visited library and did free reading gained more than those in a traditional language
      • arts summer program.
  • Public libraries help children do well in school
    • The Sources:
      • Do PL Summer Reading Programs Impact Student Achievement? (Dominican’s ‘06-07 IMLS project—in progress)
      • Making a Splash With Summer Reading , SLJ , Jan ‘03. See: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=articlePrint&articleID=CA266700
      • Study: Summer Reading Helps Students , SLJ , Feb ‘02. See: http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/index.asp?layout=articlePrint&articleID=CA192969
      • The Role of PLs in Children’s Literacy Development: An Evaluation Report . PA Library Association, ‘01. See: http://www.statelibrary.state.pa.us/libraries/lib/libraries/Role%20of%20Libraries.pdf
      • Johnson, Peter. Building Effective Programs for Summer Learning. US Dept of Education, ‘00. See: http:// www.ed.gov/americareads/sum_build.doc .
  • Public libraries help children do well in school
    • Your Story:
      • Report number of programs for preschool age children—especially story times and outreach to day care centers—and attendance at such programs.
      • Report summer reading program statistics. Also track impact, if possible.
      • Quote parents about the value of these programs.
  • Public libraries support lifelong learning
    • The Facts:
      • Chicago PL’s Austin Irving branch
      • In partnership with Wright College, serves:
        • 6,500 regular credit students, AND
        • 6,000 adult education students
      • Children’s librarian visits every classroom in every school; partnerships w/school librarians promote all children’s services
        • 75-90 parents attend story time with kids each week
  • Public libraries support lifelong learning
    • The Facts:
      • The top 3 topics for “free choice learning” are:
        • Health issues,
        • Spiritual/personal growth, and
        • Current events.
  • Public libraries support lifelong learning
    • The Sources:
      • The Engaged Library: Chicago Stories of Community Building (Urban Libraries Council (ULC, ‘06), See: http://www.urbanlibraries.org/files/ULC_PFSC_Engaged_0206.pdf
      • Partnerships for Free Choice Learning: PLs, Museums, and Public Broadcasters (Urban Institute, ULC, ‘03) See: http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410661_partnerships_for_free_choice_learning.pdf
  • Public libraries support lifelong learning
    • Your Story:
      • Report numbers of library programs—especially those offered in collaboration with other community organizations—that encourage LL and attendance at programs.
      • In annual user survey or focus group interviews, ask about LL uses of library collections & services.
      • Quote users about library’s role in their LL.
  • What we know about public libraries
    • Public libraries are …
    • Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity. Libraries …
      • Open doors of opportunity for disenfranchised communities
  • Public libraries open doors of opportunity …
    • The Facts:
      • From Urban Libraries Council ( Making Cities Stronger , 07):
        • Brooklyn Reads to Babies (early literacy campaign in 6 languages)
        • Providence Ready to Learn Partnership for Parents (early literacy training)
        • Memphis Training Wheels (mobile children’s services)
  • Public libraries open doors of opportunity …
    • The Facts:
      • From MDRC (Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, ‘01):
        • Strong library literacy programs help to encourage adult students to persevere to meet their goals
      • From Counting on Results (LRS, ‘01) :
        • Basic literacy: 42% of these patrons became citizens.
        • Business/career : 36% of these patrons explored business opportunities, started or developed business.
  • Public libraries open doors of opportunity …
    • The Sources:
      • Making Cities Stronger : PL Contributionss to Economic Development (ULC, ’07) See: http://www.urbanlibraries.org/files/making_cities_stronger.pdf
      • "I Did It for Myself“ Studying Efforts to Increase Adult Learner Persistence in Library Literacy Programs (MDRC, ’01) See: http://www.mdrc.org/publications/106/execsum.html
      • Counting on Results : New Tools for Outcome-Based Evaluation of PLs (LRS, ‘99-’01) See: http:// www.lrs.org/CoR.asp
  • Public libraries open doors of opportunity …
      • Tools:
      • PL Geographic Database (PLGDB) See: http:// www.geolib.org
      • LRS Community Analysis Scan Form See: http:// www.lrs.org/asp_public/ca_form.asp
  • Public libraries open doors of opportunity …
    • Your Story:
      • Map recent or specific circulation data to learn who is and isn’t using your library.
      • Do a community analysis. (Use PLGDB & LRS community scan form.)
      • Publicize programs on preparing for GED exam, selecting college, starting home-based business.
      • Interview key user groups in your legal service area (e.g., students, adult learners, small business owners).
      • Design outreach efforts to reach non-users.
  • What we know about public libraries
    • Public libraries are …
    • For YOU … The library is what you want it to be. Libraries ...
      • Will get you through times of no money …
      • Change people’s lives!
  • Public libraries will get you through times of no money …
    • The Facts
      • Public library usage increases when the economy slumps.
        • During the 2001 recession, circulation ran 8-9% above what would have normally been expected (ALA, ‘02).
  • Public libraries will get you through times of no money …
    • The Facts
      • Public libraries generate a measurable return-on-investment in terms of community development (SLPL, 1998).
    St Louis PL ’97 budget: $15 Million Opportunity/time costs: $90 million Consumer surplus: $47 million Willingness to pay: $15 million Teacher/caregiver benefits: $13 million Business user benefits: $ 7 million
  • Public libraries will get you through times of no money …
    • The Facts
      • Overall … public libraries return $6.54 for every $1.00 invested from all sources.
      • For every $6,448 spent on public libraries from public funding sources (federal, state, and local) … one job is created.
        • FL Taxpayer Return-on-Investment study
  • Public libraries will get you through times of no money …
    • The Sources:
      • Taxpayer Return on Investment Study of FL PLs (‘04) See: http://dlis.dos.state.fl.us/bld/roi/FinalReport.cfm
      • Economic Hard Times and PL Use Revisited , American Libraries , Aug ‘02, pp. 62-63. See: http://www.ala.org/ala/ors/reports/economichard.htm
      • Placing a Value on PL Services (St Louis PL, ‘98) See: http://www.slpl.lib.mo.us/libsrc/restoc.htm
      • For more, see the Library Research Service website’s economic impact studies page at: http://www.lrs.org/topics.asp#econ2
  • Public libraries will get you through times of no money …
    • Your Story:
      • Chart year to year trends for your community, including:
        • Library’s local income, collection expenditures;
        • Library visits, circulation, program attendance;
        • Labor force participation, unemployment rate.
      • Survey businesses that use the library about cost savings.
      • Ask users for success stories about how library services helped them find jobs, start businesses.
  • Public libraries change people’s lives
    • The Facts:
      • Of general library users
        • 74% read for pleasure.
        • 56% learned about a skill, hobby or other interest.
        • 46% found info needed for school, work or a community group.
    • * Facts on this & following slide from Counting on Results (LRS, ‘01)
  • Public libraries change people’s lives
    • The Facts--continued
      • Of all users for libraries that studied specific service responses:
        • Library as place : 59% found quiet place to think, read, write or study.
        • Local history/genealogy : 53% made progress researching family histories.
        • Basic literacy : 36% read to a child or helped a child choose a book.
  • Public libraries change people’s lives
    • The Sources:
      • Perspectives on Outcome-Based Evaluation for Libraries & Museums (IMLS, undated) See: http://www.imls.gov/pubs/pdf/pubobe.pdf
      • Knowing What Audiences Learn: Outcomes & Program Planning (IMLS PowerPoint, ‘03) See: http://www.imls.gov/grants/current/ACM-03-fnl.pps
      • Chief Officers of State Library Agencies, Member Profiles (COSLA website) See:
      • http:// www.cosla.org
      • Counting on Results : New Tools for Outcome-Based Evaluation of PLs (LRS,
      • ‘ 99-’01) See: http://www.lrs.org/CoR.asp
  • Public libraries change people’s lives
    • Your Story:
      • Conduct an outcome-based evaluation of a specific program at your library.
      • Conduct an annual user survey to give patrons the opportunity to identify how they have benefited from your library’s services.
  • What we know about public libraries
    • Public libraries are …
    • A community destination for all. Libraries …
      • Are gateways to the World Wide Web
      • Bridge the Digital Divide
  • Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web
    • The Facts:
    • From Info Institute (‘06):
      • 99% provide Internet access.
      • 83% provide access to licensed databases.
      • 55% offer digital or virtual reference services.
      • 41% offer technology training.
      • 37% offer wireless access.
    • From Gates (‘03):
      • New computers increase user visits, bring many new visitors to libraries.
      • Includes home-schoolers, travelers, and others who depend on library computers.
      • 75% of patrons "ask a librarian" when they need help with library computers.
  • Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web
    • The Sources:
      • FSU’s Information Institute (especially PL & Internet project) at http:// www.ii.fsu.edu
      • The Gates Legacy: What's changed and what's next as librarians work to sustain public access to computers , LJ , ‘03 See: http:// www.libraryjournal.com (search terms: gates legacy)
      • Gates Foundation’s U.S. Libraries Evaluation Reports at: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/UnitedStates/USLibraryProgram/Evaluation/USLibrariesFullReports.htm
      • OCLC Programs & Research publications and presentations at: http:// www.oclc.org /research/
  • Public libraries are gateways to the World Wide Web
    • Your Story:
      • Report website usage statistics for library catalog, licensed databases, virtual reference, homework help, etc.
      • Publicize profiles of patrons who use online services and how they make a difference.
      • Publicize stories of librarians helping patrons with technology.
  • Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide
    • The Facts:
      • Virtually all library outlets offer public access computers, and more than 14 million regularly use them. Poor & minority patrons are more likely than others to rely on access (Gates, ‘04).
      • Libraries in poorer areas, especially rural ones, lag behind more prosperous cities and suburbs; but, E-rate is closing gap (Info Institute, ‘02).
  • Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide
    • The Sources:
      • Toward Equality of Access: The Role of Public Libraries in Addressing the Digital Divide (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, ‘04) See: http://www.imls.gov/pubs/pdf/Equality.pdf
      • Public Library Internet Services: Impacts on the Digital Divide (Info Institute, FSU, 2002) See: http://www.ii.fsu.edu/getProjectDetail.cfm?pageID=9&ProjectID=7
  • Public libraries bridge the Digital Divide
    • Your Story:
      • Report availability of library computers (especially for poor, low education, minorities, older adults).
      • Report how patrons benefit from more or better access, thanks to E-rate.
      • Survey or interview library users to determine:
        • extent of their reliance on library access to Internet,
        • computer user demographics, and
        • reasons for Internet use (e.g., educational, economic, recreational).
  • What we know about public libraries
    • One more time …
    • Public libraries are …
    • Partners for vibrant & educated communities—where learning never stops.
    • Indispensable for a free people; places of opportunity.
    • For YOU … The library is what you want it to be.
    • A community destination for all.
  • Where to turn for help …
    • State Data Coordinators (state library agencies)
    • State Data Centers
    • Nearest library school
    • Centers for library research
    • ALA Office for Research & Statistics
    • Federal agencies: IMLS, NCES, NCLIS
    • Links to all of the above (and more) at http://www.LRS.org
    Wisconsin Public Libraries : Raising Your Community’s Net Worth