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    What is mi guk kwan tang soo do What is mi guk kwan tang soo do Document Transcript

    • AcknowledgementsI wish to take the time to thank and acknowledge the Grandmasters and Masters who helped meto learn and appreciate the Martial Art of Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan. Their dedication andlove for the martial arts has given me the same appreciation and love of the martial arts.First I wish to dedicate this manual to the Grandmasters and Masters of the modern day MartialArt of Tang Soo Do . First The Late Grandmaster Hwang Kee. Kwan Jang Nim Hwang Kee Founder of Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan (Soo Bahk Do) November 9, 1914 – July 14, 2002Kwan Jang Nim Hwang Kee was born on November 9, 1914, in Jang Dan, Kyong Kiprovince. Grandmaster Hwang Kee is the founder of Moo Duk Kwan Tan Soo Do or SooBahk Do. He studied the Korean styles of Tae Kyun, Sip Pal Ki which were believed tohave originated from Chinese styles. "Tae Kyun" that had been handed down from thelater part of the Yi Dynasty. This experience was a major influence leading him tobecome a Kwan Jang Nim, who would devote his entire life to Soo Bahk Do Moo DukKwan.In May 1936 he had the opportunity to meet a Chinese master, Master Yang, Kuk Jin andto visit Master Yangs house. Master Yang, who was highly renowned as a martial artsMaster. Mr. Hwang Kee and four other students were training under Master Yang during
    • this time. The training consisted of Seh Bop (method of postures), Bo Bop (method ofsteps) and Ryun Bod (method of conditioning) as their basic training. They also hadtrained in "Dham Toi Sip E Ro" and "Tae Kuk Kwon," which were disciplines of formand its combat applications. In 1941 was the last time Hwang Kee was able to enjoyMaster Yangs instruction. He could not communicate with or visit his Master again onceChina became a Communist country in 1946.Upon his return to Seoul after leaving his instructor Master Yang, Hwang Kee searchedfor an opportunity to continue his personal martial arts training and, possibly, teach. Itwas impossible at the time, for him to pursue his wishes in martial arts activity due to thestrict Japanese influence on all facets of the Korean culture. (The country of Korea wasoccupied by the Japanese from 1910 to August 1945). Because of this situation, Gum Do(Ken Do) and Yu Do (Ju Do) were the only two martial arts known to the general public.People did not have any knowledge of Soo Bahk, Okinawian Karate, Chinese Wu Shu, orKung Fu.Because of this situation, it was impossible for Kwan Jang Nim Hwang Kee to make hislong-time dream come true. He spent long hours of meditation and self-conditioningduring this time. He spent most of his time reading books from the library. Heparticularly enjoyed reading about astronomy, philosophy, and Okinawian Karate. It wasa very pleasant surprise for him to find karate books at the library, even though all thebooks were from Japan. (No other books were available from any other country at thattime and this was the first modern form of martial arts books he had seen).This was his first encounter with Okinawian Karate and he found that he was able tostudy the art though books at that time. Later, this knowledge influenced the Moo DukKwan system when "Tang Soo Do" was adopted by Grand Master Hwang Kee during theearly part of the Moo Duk Kwan history.Although Pyung Ahn Hyungs, Passai Hyungs, and Kong Sang Kun Hyungs, etc., werepracticed a little differently from the original Okinawian Karate (unique use of theapplication of offensive and defensive hip in all movements, and hip extension and thrustkicking techniques as well as its interpretation), these Hyungs were influenced by theKwan Jang Nims study of the books on Okinawian Karate, as indicated in the Soo BahkDo Deh Kahm (1970).During the same period, there were a number of wars initiated by Japan, which led toWorld War II. It was a very unstable time. , Korea became an independent country onAugust 15, 1945, as World War II came to an end. At the time it became possible forKwan Jang Nim Hwang Kee to fulfill his life-long dream to dedicate himself solely to themartial arts.During the previous 25 years, his maturity as a martial artist had been conditionedthrough his hard and long self-taught training of Tae Kyun and his various experiences inboth formal and informal martial arts training, as well as the significant influence by hismaster, Master Yang, while he was in China. It was not only Master Yangs technical
    • influence but also his desire to improve human character, which proved an invaluableexperience. The study of Okinawian Karate through the available books at the librarywhile he was employed by the Cho Sun Railway Bureau in Seoul form 1939 to 1945 wasalso a great influence. With these experiences in martial disciplines, he founded the MooDuk Kwan and established its philosophy on November 9, 1945.Tangsoodo or Tang Soo Do is a traditional Korean martial art. Translating the word "Tang SooDo" is hard: The word "Soo" means "hand"; however the word "Tang" has many meanings suchas "Worthiness", "Skillful", and "Strong". Since the name does not translate well today, manypeople are content with the definition "Way of the empty hand".Tang Soo Do (Hangul: 당수도)is the Korean pronunciation of the Hanja characters 唐手道. In Japanese these characters meanKarate-do but in contemporary Japanese Karate-do is written as 空手道. The Japanesepronunciation of both sets of characters is the same, but the newer version means "Way of theEmpty Hand" rather than "Way of the Tang Hand", although it could also be interpreted as "Wayof the China Hand" or "Way of the Knife Hand".The first recorded use of the term "Tang Soo Do" in contemporary history was by Chung DoKwan founder, Won Kuk Lee . Prior to the unification of the Kwans under the Korea TaekwondoAssociation, most of the major Kwans called their style Tang Soo Do, or Kong Soo Do. TheChung Do Kwan, along with the rest of the Kwans, stopped using the name Tang Soo Do andKong Soo Do when they unified under the name Taekwondo (and temporarily Tae Soo Do).The Moo Duk Kwan, being loyal to Hwang Kee, pulled out of the Kwan unification andremained independent of this unification movement, continuing to use the name Tang Soo Do.The majority of Moo Duk Kwan members followed Hwangs senior student, Chong Soo Hong,to become members of a unified Taekwondo. Their group still exists today and is known asTaekwondo Moo Duk Kwan (Moo Duk Hae) with an office in Seoul, Korea. Most schools ofTang Soo Do use the transcription "Tang Soo Do". However, scientific texts apply the officialtranscription tangsudo, written as one word. Some authors write "Tang Soo Do" and give"tangsudo" or "dangsudo" in the parenthesis. . (武藝圖譜通志 / 무예도보통지). Soo Do" wasadopted by Grand Master Hwang Kee during the early part of the Moo Duk Kwan history.In 1995 the late Hwang Kee officially changed the name of the Moo Duk Kwan style to SooBahk Do. Hwang Kee Passed Away: 7/14/2002Unlike most contemporary martial arts, it is not possible to pinpoint any one person asbeing the "founder" of Tang Soo Do. One could argue that Won Kuk Lee founded thestyle, being the first known person to use the name; that argument would be dubious, atbest. However, the Moo Duk Kwan style of Tang Soo Do (from which nearly all modernTang Soo Do stylists trace their lineage) can be traced to a single founder: GrandmasterHwang Kee. Hwang Kee claimed to have had learned Chinese martial arts while inManchuria. However, all other Kwan seniors say there is no proof for this claim. He alsoclaimed influence by Japanese Karate, and the indigenous Korean arts of Taekkyon
    • (택견) and Subak. However, Korea Taekkyon Association Grandmaster Yong Bok Leestates these claims are not true. Hwang Kee also claimed to have been highly influencedby an old book about martial arts called the Muye Dobo Tongji (1790).Won Kuk Lee, the founder of Chung Do Kwan, has Hwang Kee listed in his records as a5th Geup (about green belt level). He states that Hwang Kee came to him to learn thecorrect movements of Karate, Hwang Kee found a Karate book by Gichin Funakoshi,who was Lees teacher.Secondly I would like to pay tribute to My Grandmaster the late Jae Joon Kim. Grand Master Jae Joon Kim August 15, 1929 – January 09, 2007 President & Founder World Moo Duk Kwan Tang Soo Do FederationGrandmaster Jae Joon Kim, 77, died January 09, 2007 in Brandon, Florida. He was born August15, 1929 in Seoul, Korea and was the son of a world champion sumo wrestler. Grandmaster J.J.Kim started his training in Tang Soo Do in 1945 under the guidance of Grandmaster Hwang Kee.In 1947 Grandmaster J.J. Kim earned his black belt, Dan #38 and in 1952, he assisted in theformation of the Korean Tang Soo Do Association in Korea. From 1955 – 1959, he was a top
    • master instructor. In 1961, he was appointed Vice-President of the Korean Soo Bahk DoAssociation (the parent organization headed by Grandmaster Hwang Kee). In 1967-1968, he wasthe Chief Master Instructor of Korean, U.S. and Vietnamese Special Forces in Vietnam. In 1969,Grandmaster J.J. Kim was awarded 8th Dan and appointed president of Moo Duk Kwan in theUSA by Grandmaster Hwang Kee. He brought Moo Duk Kwan to the United States and foundedthe Moo Duk Kwan Tang Soo Do Association in Detroit, Michigan. In the 1970’s, GrandmasterJ.J. Kim founded the World Moo Duk Kwan Tang Soo Do Federation. In 1987, he moved theWorld headquarters and his family to Brandon, Florida. In 2004, Grandmaster J.J. Kim wasinducted into the Tae Kwon Do Times Hall of Fame. On April 22, 2006 Grandmaster J.J. Kimwas inducted into the Grandmasters Society Hall of Fame. Later that same year, he founded theWorld Traditional Tang Soo Do Federation. The world’s martial art community consideredGrandmaster Jae Joon Kim a Master’s Master. Grandmaster Jae Joon Kim is survived by his loving wife Kum Soon Yun, his sons Nam, Sauland Eric, his daughters Im, Shim and 12 grandchildren along with all his loyal studentsworldwide. Grandmaster Jae Joon Kim was a devoted family man, teacher and an inspiration toall he came into contact with. He will be missed.And lastly but not least I would like to pay special tribute to my master and mentor. GrandmasterDonna Lee Buesking, She instilled in me a love for the Martial Arts Especially Tang Soo DoMoo Duk Kwan. She is a Great Martial Artist, Master and friend. Without her patience andguidance in teaching me Martial Arts I would not be where I am today and for this I will beeternally grateful.
    • Grandmaster Donna Lee BueskingGrandmaster Lee Buesking started her Training in Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan in the mid1970’s along with her son. She trained with Grandmaster Jae Joon Kim where she obtained her4th Dan Masters Rank in the late 1970’s. Also at that time she opened her own DoJang inClawson, Michigan Called Lee’s Academy of Tang Soo Do and Self-Defense. Where she hadabout 100 Black Belt Dan members and opened at least 5 to 6 satellite schools in Troy, Clawson,Huntington Woods, Lake Orion, University of Michigan and Pleasant Ridge She Has trained invarious styles of martial arts and self defense she obtained the rank of 5th Dan in Tang Soo Doand founded her own style of martial arts called Jion Jee Do Kwan, which was certified andrecognized by the Chinese Sokeship council as a legitimate martial arts style founded by MasterLee. Master. Lee Was Twice Inducted into The World Martial Arts Hall of Fame in 1992 and in1994. She has also received many more awards and certificates for her dedication and diligencein promoting the martial arts and self defense. I trained with Master Lee from 1982 until I movedto Kentucky in 1996. It was some of the best years of my life to be one of her students and seniorinstructors. She is one of the best martial artists, Instructors and Masters that I have ever seen orhad the pleasure to train under. Her teaching skills and fighting abilities are above reproach. As aMaster instructor she was one of the best, she could inspire you and teach you and I seriouslydoubt that I would have ever excelled in the martial arts or come to love it as much I do withouther dedication to teaching it. She made you feel proud and gave you confidence to do your best.Master Lee extended herself in all that she taught and in being a superb Master and friend. That Iwill always have a special place in my heart and I wish to thank her for having the patients to putup with me and make me a better person and Martial Artist.Master Keith Alan Patterson.
    • About the author of this manual Master Keith Alan PattersonI started to learn about martial arts, when I was in high school in the late 1960’s learning some ofthe techniques and movements from a foreign exchange student from Japan. He lived with afamily down the street where I grew up. His name was Yaskhi, watching him do his Karate madea big impression on me that would later lead me to get involved with the martial arts. I actuallystarted training in the Martial Art of Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan In late 1979 At the HazelPark Recreation Center. I train there on and off from 1979 to 1982 under Grandmaster Jae JoonKim’s middle son Master Saul Myoung Kim I trained for my first rank there and then testedunder Grandmaster Jae Joon Kim for my first Belt which was 8th Gup (purple belt with onestripe). Trained with a friend of mine Chuck Butte who talked me into coming and trying out thismartial art class, at the time the main club was down on Grand River Rd. in Detroit. This was farto travel every other day and in a very bad neighborhood. Chuck suggested that we try one ofGrandmaster Jae Joon Kim’s satellite schools that was located in Clawson, Michigan it was inthe basement of a woman Named Master Lee Buesking( I sure was glad to be a part of thosetimes we called the basement years) she had about 30 to 40 students at the time. It was fundodging poles and each other to train there were so many wonderful students, Black Belts and ofcourse Master Lee. I was hooked I started training 3 days a week. In 1983 I tested for my secondStripe on my purple belt 7th Gup and then in 1984 thru 1985, I Trained and tested for my 6th, 5thand 4th Gups Green Belts. In 1986 Master Lee opened her first actual Training hall DoJang inClawson Michigan it was on the second floor of a building at the south west corner of 14 mileand Main St. In 1986 I trained and tested for my 3rd, 2nd and 1st Gups Red Belts. At 1st Gup I began helpingto teach classes at the main Club and at the satellite schools. On June 14, 1987 I tested For andreceived my first degree Black (1st Dan Sho Dan) and became an assistant Instructor for Lees’Academy, Teaching at the main club and four of the satellite schools Troy Boys and Girls Club,
    • Hunter Community Center in Clawson, Pleasant Ridge Community Center in Pleasant Ridge andin Huntington Woods I taught Students from the ages of 5 years old to 50+ years old and enjoyedevery one of them and every moment of my teaching and training. On November 6, 1988 I testedfor and received my Second Degree Black Belt (2nd Dan Ee Dan). During the next 3 to 4 years Itrained and taught 5 to 6 days a week. Did a lot of tournaments, Judging, competing and trainingother students to compete in tournaments. I helped out with the self defense classes and became aSenior Instructor for Lee’s Academy. In 1992 I was nominated and received an Award Inductingme In to The World Martial Arts Hall Of Fame Instructor of the year Tang Soo Do. On October3, 1993 I tested and received my third degree Black Belt (3rd Dan Sam Dan). Then on May 7,1994 I was nominated and inducted in to the World Martial Arts Hall of Fame for MaleInstructor of the year Tang Soo Do. I taught, Trained and competed at Lee’s Academy up untilJanuary 1996. At which time I moved to Western Kentucky to take care of my Grand Parents who both in theirlate 80’s and early 90’s. My Grandfather passed away August 26, 1999 at the age of 93. I met mywife to be at his funeral we were married in 2003 best thing that ever happened to me. Ruth ismy friend, partner and Wife, she keeps me inline and I make her laugh, she is the Best Thing inmy life! In January 2005 my Grandmother passed at the age of 96. All 4 of my Grand Parentswere wonderful people, so are my aunts and uncles the ones who have passed on are thought ofeach and every day and will be sorely missed. Just Remember Family is one thing that can’t bereplaced once their gone, it’s too late to share a kind, a word of encouragement, a show ofaffection or just to sit and talk to them. The 3 ½ years that I spent with them were worth more tome than mere words can explain. I tested and received my 4th Dan 4th Degree Black Belt MastersRank On December 15,2005 In 2006 I formed my own style or form of Tang Soo Do Called MiGuk Kwan Tang Soo Do. Mi Guk Roughly translated from the Chinese means American orUnited States and in some dialects of Chinese means Beautiful People, Kwan Means Academy,School or place of Training Therefore in Chinese you would have Mi Guk Kwan written asbelow.
    • Why This ManualMost of this material in this book has been written down before, as a matter of fact some of it forthousands of years. I studied Grandmaster Hwang Kee’s first book and other Tang Soo DoManuals for about 25 or 30 years now, some of them tell you about things, like the Moo DukKwan Emblem what the colors represent on it and on the Korean flag, But then show them inblack and white or in one color which leaves most beginning students not having a clue aboutwhat is being talked about. I hope this manual will answer some of these questions and start anew generation of Tang Soo Do.Secondly since the early to mid 1990’s The Use of the term Moo Duk Kwan along with TangSoo Do on your uniforms, classes or certificates has been restricted to those who train under theWorld Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan Federation or now called So Bahk Do. Personally I don’tknow how one group can patent a common symbol such as the fist and Chinese characters thatrepresent Moo Duk Kwan especially for a Korean based Martial Art. But they have and you haveto belong to their organization to use Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan or Also Moo Duk KwanTang So Do. I have spent almost 30 years training in Moo Duk Kwan Tang Soo Do and paid mydues both monetary and with my time and sweat coming up thru the ranks. I paid so I personallyfeel that they took my money to train me so I should be able to use and teach under the Moo DukKwan Tang Soo Do name. But this is no longer possible without paying more to belong to theirorganization or be sued for using Moo Duk Kwan. In Grandmaster Hwang Kee’s Book , Hestates “that the martial arts is like a river constantly branching off, changing to meet the needs ofthe river to keep flowing and that martial arts is like that river it must evolve and change to meetthe needs and fit the times of the practitioners who use and train in the martial arts”. That isexactly what my purpose is I am branching off and forming a new branch of Tang Soo Do thatmeets the needs of the American people who want to train in the martial arts. The new branch ofthe Martial Arts is called Western Kentucky Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do. Mi Guk Translatesfrom the Chinese to mean United States or American and in some translations means beautifulpeople and Kwan means School, Academy or place of training. In Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Iwill teach the Traditional Korean art of Tang Soo Do and then update some of the teachings to fittoday’s times and situations. Most of the History and technical moves in this book that have todo with Tang Soo Do come from Grandmaster Hwang Kee’s own book, his Masters, studentsand predecessors that I have had the pleasure of training under or knowing. I hope this manualwill help my students and all who are interested learn a little bit more about Tang Soo Do and theMartial Arts to which it belongs. This book will only cover the basics of Mi Guk Kwan TangSoo Do there will be many more techniques, forms, stances and Movements. That you will learnthat are not covered in this manual X
    • Table of Contents1. The Moo Duk Kwan Emblem2. The Mi Guk Kwan Emblem3. The American Flag4. The Korean Flag5. What is Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do6. The Philosophy of Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do7. What is Meditation8. Bowing Procedure9. How to Bow10. Opening & Closing of Class11. Western Kentucky Mi Guk Kwan Principles12.Creeds of Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do13. Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do points of Emphasis on mental training14.Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do points of Emphasis on Physical Development15. 5 Requisites on Mental Training16. Matters that Demand special attention in Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do17. Uniform and Belt System in Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do18. Belt Rank System in Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do19. Requirements for 8Th Gup thru 1st Dan rank testing20. Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Korean Terminology21. Stances Jaseh(Cha Se)22. Basic Striking weapons23. Vital Target Areas24. Hyungs (Forms) XX
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    • Mi Guk Translated from the Chinese Means United States or AmericanAnd some Dialects Means Beautiful People. Kwan translates as Academy or club or placeof learning or training Page 2
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    • What is Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Tang Soo Do can be translated as “Open Hand of the Tang Dynasty” or “China OpenHand”. The term “Tang Soo Do” is the Korean Equivalent of the Japanese word “karate”, whichin Japanese means “Empty Hand”. Tang Soo Do is a Korean system of unarmed combat of ancient origins it was first taughtin this country almost five or six decades ago by American servicemen who had studied thesystem in Korea after the Korean War. In the past several decades many Korean instructors haveimmigrated to the United States in response to a growing interest here in the martial arts. The ancient origins of Tang Soo Do can be traced to before the time of Christ, whennative fighting forms were already developing in the Korean peninsula. Korean warrior-knightscalled Hawrang-do trained in unarmed as well as armed combat and fought in the wars ofnational unity that have marked Korean history through many centuries. Tang Soo Do has been influenced by the many flowing, changing streams of the Orientalmartial arts. The sixth century Indian Monk Bodhidharma (Called Daruma in Japanese), thefounder of Zen Buddhism, helped develop a fighting system in northern China by combining theZen discipline and philosophy with rigorous exercise. This “Chinese boxing”, through trade warsand colonization eventually came to influence the martial arts in Korea and throughout the FarEast. Oriental masters of these diverse martial arts over the centuries combined their ownnational systems with elements from other countries, so that today Tang Soo Do, Kung Fu, Thaiboxing, Japanese and Okinawian Karate, ect. Could be said to be of one genus, differing only inspecies, sharing more in common than differing in substance. Tang Soo Do is a “Hard” or “External” system, that has traditionally emphasized kickingover punching, using multiple combinations of hand and feet techniques, using speed and agilityto out maneuver ones opponent, although in the West the influence of other martial arts andboxing has encouraged many Tang Soo Do instructors to experiment with techniques from othersystems, yet maintaining the traditional discipline of the art. Page 5
    • The Philosophy of Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do The Philosophy and goals of Tang Soo Do (1) to conduct life in accordance with theprinciples of nature and the laws of God: (2) to remember the Um & Yang principles of light anddark, good & evil right & wrong (3) to develop a well-balance mind and body. If your mind isincompetent, your body will serve as a poisonous instrument of destruction. (4) To givereverence to God for all of the things in life he has bestowed upon you, to meditate and pray forguidance in all that you do and say. To practice teach martial arts in a way that would bepleasing unto him and to do his will by being a good person and living life as the gift he gaveyou. What Is Meditation The purpose of meditation is to clear and clean your mind so that your entireconcentration will be on Tang Soo Do. You should use your meditation period to direct yourmind so that it will be in complete control of your body. During meditation you should ask Godfor the strength and wisdom to learn and use Tang Soo Do in a way that would be pleasing untohim. You should also give thanks unto God for your Health, for your Country for giving you thefreedom to learn and practice Tang Soo Do. Bowing Procedure The first thing a beginning student must learn is how to bow, which is the Oriental way ofshowing respect. The practitioner of Tang Soo Do bows to the training area (the Do Chang), tothe flags on the wall, to the instructor at the beginning and end of class and to a partner beforeand after one steps and sparring. Also when the Grand Master, Master or Instructor of the classenters the Do Chang. How to Bow The Student stands at attention with feet side by side parallel to each other. Hands areheld open and down to the sides of their body. Bend at the waist to about a 45 degree angle. Eyeslook downward, except in one steps and sparring when eyes are kept on the opponents lower partof the body (chest or below). Page 6
    • Traditional Bow Opening & Closing of Class Cha Ryut (Cheer it) Come to attention Toe Rah (Toro) Turn to the Flag (s) Kyung Yet (Kin Yet) Bow to the flag (s) Ba Roe Return to “Ready” Position Toe Rah (Toro) Turn to Master or instructor Kyung Yet (Kin Yet) Bow to Master or Instructor Ahn Jo Sit Down Muk Yum (Moo Kim) Meditate (Clear mind of all things exceptfor the studying of Martial Arts. (Pray to God for guidance if you choose to help you to learn andpractice the martial arts in a way that would be pleasing unto him.)) Meditation is a veryimportant part of martial arts and should be practiced. It helps with the mental aspects of yourtraining and focus. It gives you peace and inner strength and a harmony of mind and body. To close the classes repeat the same procedure. If in some cases if no flags are present.Eliminate the bowing to the flags and just bow to the Master or Instructor. Page 7
    • Mi Guk KwanTang Soo Do Principles 1. Responsibility 2. Sincerity 3. JusticeYou always must take responsibility for your actions. Be sincere with yourselfand others for it builds good moral character and earns you respect of yourpeers. You always must be Just in your actions, Justice is a gift that if misusedcan be lost or one sided. Justice is a very important to maintain a balance andharmony between all people you must be fair and impartial when seekingJustice for you want people to be fair and impartial when dispensing Justiceto you. Creeds of Mi Guk KwanTang Soo Do 1. Be loyal to your Country. 2. Be obedient to your parents. 3. Be Loveable between husband and wife. 4. Be cooperative between brothers. 5. Be respectful to your elders. 6. Be faithful between teacher and student. 7. Be faithful between friends. 8. Be accountable for your actions and decisions. Points of Emphasis on Mental Training 1. Reverence for nature 2. Physical Concentration (Ki-up). 3. Courtesy. 4. Modesty. 5. Thankfulness. 6. Self-sacrifice. 7. Cultivate courage. 8. Be strong inside and mild outside. 9. Endurance. 10. Reading ability. Page 8
    • Points of Emphasis on Physical Development 1. Vocal exhalation, for thoracic strength (Ki-up). 2. Focus of sight. 3. Continuous balance during movements. 4. Flexibility of the body. 5. Correct muscle tone for maximum power. 6. High and low speed techniques. 7. Exactness of techniques. 8. Adjustment for proper distance. 9. Proper breathing for endurance. 10. Conditioning hands and feet. 5 Requisites on Mental Training 1. Oneness with nature. 2. Complete awareness of environment. 3. Experience. 4. Conscience. 5. Culture.Matters That Demand Special Attention While Training 1. Purpose of training should be enhancement of the mental and physical self. 2. Sincerity is necessary. 3. Effort is necessary. 4. Consistent schedule during practice. 5. Do your best when training. 6. Train in the basic spirit of Tang Soo Do. 7. Regularly spaced practice sessions. 8. Obey without objection instructions of the Master, Instructor and senior Dan members, look and learn from them. 9. Don’t be overly ambitious. 10. Pay attention to every aspect of your training. 11. Pay attention to the order of training. 12. Get instruction step by step in new forms (Hyungs) and techniques. 13. Cleanliness is desired after practice is finished. Page 9
    • Uniform and Belt System in Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo DoThe Teo Bok (uniform) with proper colored trim is the traditional Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Douniform. Black Belt holders of Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do wear Dark Blue trimmed uniforms.The Black Belt in Tang Soo Do is Dark Navy Blue because the Grand Master who foundedModern day Tang Soo Do Moo Duk Kwan Grand Master Hwang Kee, Thought, that black meantfinal. He said that that Black belt was the beginning not the end, Therefore he chose dark bluebecause it meant never ending like the Universe, oceans and the sky. That Black belt was reallyjust the starting point or Beginning of real understanding of any martial art such as Tang SooDo. Belt Rank System of Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo DoRank Uniform Trim Belt ColorBlack Belts……………………....Dark Blue…………………………………...Dark Blue1st through 3rd Gup………………Red………………………………………….Red4th through 6th Gup………………Green………………………………………..Green7th through 8th Gup………………No trim……………………………………….Purple9th Gup…………………………...No trim……………………………………….WhiteNote: The uniform trim on Gup uniforms usually matches the belt color and is worn only on thefront and neck opening of the uniform top. Black Belt uniforms are trimmed around the cuffs,neck, front and bottom of the uniform. Promotion is a privilege, not a right. To be promoted is an honor. No one will wear a belt orcolor other than that which was awarded to him/her.Color Rank TrimWhite Beginner NonePurple 8th or 7th Gup NoneGreen 6th, 5th and 4th Gup Green on lapelRed 3rd, 2nd and 1st Gup Red on lapelDark Navy Blue/ 1st Dan and above 2” Blue trim on lapel, cuffsBlack Belt and Bottom of jacket Page 10
    • Requirements for 8th or 7th Gup: (Purple Belt)1. Must be in the club at least 2 ½ months.2. Must know at least 12 one-steps (Il Soo Shik Dae Ryun).3. Must know basic actions (blocks, kicks, stances and punches).4. Must know the first 3 basic forms (Hyungs). (Giecho Hyung Il Bu, YI Bu and Sahm Bu)5. Break with a basic action (hand, foot or elbow).Requirements for 6th Gup: (Green Belt one stripe)1. Must know all purple belt requirements(8th & 7th Gup).2. Must Know up to Pyung An Cho Dan (1).3. Must Free-fight.4. Must have trained at least six (6) weeks prior to testing date.Requirements for 5th Gup: (Green Belt two stripes)1. Must know all 6th Gup requirements.2. Must Know up to Pyung An Yi Dan (2).Requirements for 4th Gup: (Green Belt three Stripes) 1. Must know all 5th Gup requirements. 2. Must know up to Pyung An Sahm Dan (3). 3. Must know some Korean terminology. 4. Must help teach a formal class.Requirements for 3rd Gup: (Red Belt one Stripe) 1. Must know all 4th Gup Requirements. 2. Must know up to Pyung An Sah Dan (4). 3. Must know more Korean terminology. Requirements for 2nd Gup: (Red Belt two stripes) 1. Must know all 3rd Gup requirements. 2. Must know up to Pyung An Oe Dan (5). 3. Must know Korean terminology. Page 11
    • Requirements for 1st Gup: (Red Belt three stripes) 1. Must know all 2nd Gup requirements. 2. Must know up to Bassai. 3. 1st Gups must be able and willing to help with and teach classes. Assist Dan members with classes and help lower rank Gups with learning Hyungs, and basic actions. 1st Gups have a responsibility to conduct themselves in a way that sets a very good example to all the lower ranks under him/her and earns the respect of the Dan members and the Master of the club. Requirements for 1st Dan: (Black Belt) 1. Must hold the rank of 1st Gup for six (6) to nine (9) months and must have had continuous training. 2. Must be recommended by his/her instructor. 3. Must know all 1st Gup requirements. 4. Must take a written test (terminology). 5. Must know Bassai and all lower forms (Hyungs). 6. Must break at least 2” of wood or brick. 7. Shall be loyal, dedicated, have a good attitude and contribute to the club and to the association at all times. Promote body and mind for he/she shall be a reflection of his/her instructor and club. 8. Must teach formal classes for through teaching others, we learn better the what, when, where and how of what we are doing.All degrees of Black Belt or Dan Ranks above 1 st Dan require at least one yearof training, Teaching and class participation per Degree Stripe or DanRanking. For if you are an 1st Dan you train for at least 1 ½ to 2 years beforeyou are eligible to test for your 2nd Dan (2nd Degree black belt), 2 ½ to 3 yearsbetween 2nd and 3rd Dan and so on. The Higher Dan rank you get the morestudying and training you must go through to get to the next level of Black belt. Page 12
    • Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Terminology General TermsKwan Jang Nym…………………………………………………….GrandmasterSa Bum Nym………………………………………………………...Master InstructorKwan Won…………………………………………………………..Student or memberKook Kee…………………………………………………………… FlagDo Chang……………………………………………………………Training HallTeo Bok………………………………………………………………UniformDan (Don)…………………………………………………………….Black Belt RankGup…………………………………………………………….Ranks or Grades below Black BeltCha Ryut (Cheer It)……………………………………………Come to attentionKyung Yet……………………………………………………..Bow or SaluteToe Rah……………………………………………………...…TurnAhn Jo……………………………………………………….…Sit DownMook Yum (Moo Kim)………………………………………..MeditateYe Ru Sut……………………………………………………….Stand upShi Chak (See Chuck)…………………………………………..BeginJum Bee……………………………………………………….. ReadyBa Roe…………………………………………………………..Return to the Ready positionKong Kyuk………………………………………………………AttackShu…………………………………………………………..…..Rest or stand at easeChun Gul Jaseh (Cha Se)…………………………………….......Front Stance Page 13
    • Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Terminology General TermsHu Gul Jaseh (Cha Se)…………………….……………….....…Back StanceKee Ma Jaseh (Cha Se)……………………….………………...Horseback StanceCha Yu Jaseh (Cha Se)………………………………………..….Free-Fighting StanceMahkee………………………………………………………..…Block or defenseHa Dan………………………………………………………..….Lower Part of bodyChoong Dan……………………………………………………..Middle Part of bodySang Dan………………………………………………………..Upper Part of bodyHu Jin (Ho Jin)…………………………………………………..Moving BackwardsCha Gi (Cha Gee)……………………………………………………..KickUp Cha Gi (Cha Gee)………………………………………………….Front KickYup Cha Gi (Cha Gee)………………………………………………...Side KickTol Yu Cha Gi (Tora Cha Gee)...…………………………..Round Kick (Round House)Dui Cha Gi (Dee Cha Gee)…………………………………Back KickMooh Rup Cha Gi (Cha Gee)…………………………………………...Knee Strike or kickHae Ryu……………………………………………………………Stomp kickEe Dan Up Cha Gi……………………………………………….Hop or Skip Front KickEe Dan Yup Cha Gi……………………………………………..Hop or Skip Side KickEe Dan Dui Cha Gi……………………………….……………..Hop or Skip Back KickEe Dan Tol Ryu Cha Gi…………………………..…………… Hop or Skip Round KickYuk Jin……………………………………………………………Reverse Punch Page 14
    • Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Terminology General TermsHang Jin…………………………………………..………………Side PunchGap Kwan…………………………………………..…………….Back FistSoo Do………………………………………………...…………..Knife HandYuk Soo Do………………………………………….…….Reverse Knife Hand or Ridge HandKwan Soo…………………………….…………………………..Spear HandJang Kwon……………………………………………………..Palm StrikeYahng Pahl……………………………………………………….Double FistedKyo Cha…………………………………………………………..X-BlockAhnesu Phakoo Ro…………………………………………….…Inside to OutsidePakesau Ahnoo Ro……………………………………..………..Outside to Inside Page 15
    • Stances Jaseh (Cha Se) Stances are very important for maintaining balance, strength and the ability to make quickprecise movements. Without the proper stance your forms, techniques and fighting abilities willbe weak and not effective. The proper stance is basic to all movements in Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do and is thefoundation of each movement. Movement is dependent upon balance, and balance onstance. It is Difficult to perform a movement without proper balance. Whether thetechnique is successful or not depends upon a fine adjustment of balance. Therefore, balance is the most important aspect of any stance. It should be noted thatsome people should use slightly different distances and angles than shown in thediagrams. This is because we are not machines, but we are all human beings withdifferent bodies, some big and some small. The diagrams are based on standarddistances and angles. Movements are described on the basis of average size and anglesof position and distance are stated according to theideal situation. Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Dos scientific systematic approach was startedby training through techniques that were based on scientific methods. Stance is bestexplained by theories found in science. The most import ant functions of the stance are to achieve balance despite a movingcenter of gravity and to lead a movement to its next Position or stance. The center of balance originates from the gravity of the earth. Therefore, the wider thebase, the more safely balanced the object is when the base is equidistant from both sidesfrom the center of gravity. Otherwise the object will be unstable or easy to topple. The principle can be stated in this way: The stance will be more stable and balanced ifIt occupies more ground space. The less ground space the stance occupies, the weakerthe stance becomes. However, we cannot only take into account balance and stability. Balance isimportant but one cannot neglect speed. There are many movements and many actionsin Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do. It is important to be able to move quickly and easily. When speed plus balance and stability are needed to defend against the opponent,The practitioner should use the Hugul Cha Se stance. The Chun Kul Cha Se stanceIs used for great power and some speed. Kee Ma Cha Se stance is used for stabilityAnd balance. It gives your opponent less of a target area while making blocking andkicking lots easier and faster than the Chun Kul Cha Se stance, while giving thepractitioner good balance and stability. Page 16
    • Stances Jaseh (Cha Se) Korean American .Choon Bee Jaseh………………………………………………………………..Ready StanceChun Kul Jaseh………………………………………………………………….Front StanceHu Gul Jaseh..…………………………………………………………………...Back StanceKi Ma Rip Jaseh………...……………………………………………………….Horseback StanceThere are many more stances and versions of these stances, but we will study and learn thesebasic stances first and learn more of stances as we progress thru the ranks Choon Bee Jaseh Stance (Ready Position) Choon Bee Jaseh is a preparatory stance or movement to set the body so that one isready to respond to any action in Tang Soo Do. It is both a mental and physicalpreparation so that you are ready to respond to any action and prepared both mentallyand physically to do anything. The start of an action will decide whether it will besuccessful or not. An appropriate proverb states that, ”The starting is half theachieving.” The Beginning is important in all human endeavors, but in Mi Guk KwanTang Soo Do the beginning position is more important because each time we face ouropponent we are involved in a life and death struggle. It is very important, therefore topay close attention to the way we begin. We not only assume the Choon Bee Jaseh at the beginning of a motion, but also at theend. This is in agreement with the theory that every- thing will become one accordingto the sequential philosophy of Yin and Yang (the oriental philosophy which links plusand minus). Someone may start out bravely but may fail in the end. Sometimes we willcarry on continuously without any mistakes but then make mistakes during the lastmovement. The practitioner must pay attention throughout his movement to preventunexpected failure. Even at the end we must maintain our state of readiness lestsomething happen. Page 17
    • Therefore, we assume the Choon Bee Jaseh at the start and at the finish and then wecan rest. We should apply the Choon Bee Jaseh training and philosophy to all oursocial living and not only to Tang Soo Do, because even in success if you neglect thelast minutes you may fail and it is the ending that will stay in others minds. With theChoon Bee Jaseh, we learn to preserve the beauty of the last moment. To assumeChoon Bee Jaseh, stand and spread both feet to the width of your shoulders. Lookstraight ahead and make both fists lightly. Bring your fists in front of the abdomen.There should be a space of about 4 to 6 inches between the body and hands (Fig. 2). Specification of the BodyFace: Pull your chin back naturally to keep your head straight.Chest: Expand the chest naturally and stand straight.Arms: Bend your arms slightly and naturally.Legs: Spread your legs naturally (Fig. 1 A; and maintain angles of 30 degreesfor legs and 75 degrees for both feet as shown. Center of Gravity: Stand with a90-degree angle between the body and the ground (Fig.1 C).Sight: There should be a 90-degree angle between the line of sight and thefront of the face (Fig.1 C)Hands: Hold the fists lightly closed and bring them both 4 to 6 inches in front ofthe abdomen. Feet keep your feet at shoulder width, slightly facing outward(Fig.1 B).Distribution of Strength: Distribute 10 percent of all your strength to everypart of your body equally. Concentrate your balance on your abdomen.Purpose: This is the basic fundamental motion to start every movement.Special Remarks: This Choon Bee Jaseh is only one of many “ready stances”,but is the most representative. Page 18
    • Choon Bee Jaseh (Ready Stance) Fig 2 Page 19
    • Chun Gul Jaseh Stance (Front Stance) Chun Gul Jaseh Stance (Front Stance) is a power stance for both offensive and defensivemotions. This stance makes moving forward while defending one’s self or attacking an opponentstronger and in balance. First spread both legs to 1 shoulders width apart. Then step forwardwith one leg at least 1 to 1 ½ shoulders length. The front leg is bent at the knee while keeping theback leg straight. Both feet are facing forward. Concentrate your balance in the center of yourbody. See Fig.3 D for an illustration of this stance. Specification of the bodyHead: Look straight ahead with your head held upright and straight. Make sure not to tilt yourhead forward, backward or to either sideBody: Stand straight and naturally expand your chest.Arms: Drop your arms to both sides of your body naturally or held up in the fighting positionLegs: Spread your legs to the sides to about one shoulders length apart in width. Then stepforward with one leg to about one to one and one half shoulders length and bend the front legwhile keeping the back leg straight. There is an angle of 60 Degrees between the rear leg and theground. There is an angle of 80 degrees between both legs. The knee of the front leg is bent tomake a 130 degree angle between both parts of the leg. The bottom of the front leg maintains a90 degree angle with the ground. See Fig. 3 C.Balance: the center of gravity runs through the center line of the body. The body is at a 90degree angle to the ground as shown in Fig. 3 C.Sight: Maintain a line of focus at a 90 degree angle from the face. Look straight ahead.Hands: hold your fist closed loosely and keep your arms down at your sides straight andnaturally or up in the guard position (fighting position)Feet: the distance between both feet is about one to one and one half shoulders apart in lengthand one shoulders length in width.Distribution of Strength: Distribute 10 percent of your total strength to the upper part of yourbody and distribute 15 percent of your total to each leg. Concentrate your balance in theabdomen.Application: The fundamental stance to start any movement. Often used as an offensive stance.One can advance forward and backwards easily from this stance. This stance provides a strongbalance and stability to withstand any frontal attack. Page 20
    • Fig. 3 DPage 21
    • Hu Gul Jaseh (Back Stance or Cat Stance) In this stance most of your balance is concentrated on your rear leg. To assume thisstance, face your rear leg 90 degrees to the left or right (Depending on which side of your body isfacing forward) and bend the rear leg. Move the front foot a short step to the side of your bodyabout 10 to 12 inches there is no or little weight on the front leg, you are sitting on your back legthe front leg can be picked up or moved with very little effort. The front leg is bent the feet forman L shape as in Fig. 4B or as seen in Fig. 4C also. The body is naturally facing in a sidedirection; i.e., in the center of the angle between both legs. The head is turned in the direction ofthe front extended leg. This stance is particular to the martial arts and is not usually foundelsewhere. The practitioner may turn the upper part of their body to the side only as far as to notinterfere with their defense. A version of this stance is also known as the fighting stance. Thisstance allows easy movement and the ability to kick off the front leg very quickly and easily, it isa good defensive stance. Specification of the BodyHead: the Head is turned in the same direction as the front foot. The head is kept straight andupright (not tilted in any direction).Body: Shoulders are kept straight and in line with the front foot.Arms: The arms are usually kept on the waist as in Fig. 4A or up in a fighting positionFig. 4CLegs: Maintain a 90 degree angle between the rear leg and the ground. The rear leg is bentslightly. The front leg is bent and maintains an angle of 120 degrees between the thigh and thecalf. As seen in Fig. 4A and in Fig. 4C.Balance: The Center of gravity is in a line which extends from a 90 degree angle with theground through the rear leg to the upper part of the body as seen in Fig. 4ASight: Maintain a line of focus at a 90 degree from your face; look straight ahead over theextended front leg as seen in Fig. 4A and in Fig. 4C.Hands: Hold both fists loosely closed and place them on both sides of the waist as in Fig. 4Aand or held in a fighting position as in Fig. 4CFeet: The distance between the feet is about 10 to 12 inches and both feet make an L shape asseen in Fig. 4B Page 22
    • Distribution of Strength: Distribute 10 percent of your total strength to the upper part of yourbody and your front leg. Distribute 15 percent of your total strength to the rear leg.With this stance it is easy to move backward and it affords a good defensive position either to thefront or to the back. It allows fast and effective kicking from the front leg or rear leg. Hu Gul Jaseh (back Stance or Cat Stance) Page 23
    • FIG. 4 CPage 24
    • Ki Ma Rip Jaseh (Horseback Stance)As the name infers you look as though you are sitting on horseback. Weight is distributed evenlybetween both legs, knees are bent feet are pointing straight ahead or up to an 30 degree angle in Either Direction hands are held on sides of waist or up in fighting position. This stance gives youropponent a much smaller target and give you the ability to move back and forth very quickly and tothrow techniques off the back leg such as round kicks or rear legged sidekicks. Ki Ma Rip Jaseh (Horseback Stance) Page 25
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    • FORMS (HYUNG) Introduction The concepts of forms Ancient people had a deep interest in the development of forms as well as a profoundUnderstanding of them. The following is a translation of what is found in the text,Moo Yei Do Bo Tong Ji, author unknown, of the 17th century: "Performing with hands and feet and conditioning the body is the beginning of the studyof the art of Tang Soo Do. In actual combat, form does not seem in an obvious way to be a necessarypart of the martial arts. However, practicing forms perfects the ability to perform hand and foottechniques freely. This is fundamental to making the best use of ones body at all times." Basic to allmartial arts is this: After the basic movements are learned they are applied to andtransformed into forms. As established, traditional and clearly defined sets of steps, jumps,blocks, kicks, punches and thrusts, each of the forms in our art has a unity and purpose. Basic forms consists of one block, one thrust or strike, and turns patterned to develop control, rhythm, power and speed in the early integration of basic techniques. As they progress, the forms become increasingly complex in the variety, combination and sequence of blocks, kicks, thrusts, jumps and turns. 0ne advanced form may take years of daily practice and intense concentration to master. Perfectform, exquisite fusion of mind and body is a high art and a thing of beauty. The form is not, however,the whole art in itself. As an exercise, it is that part of the progression in the art which conditions themind, body and reflexes for the stresses of free sparring and ultimately for the realities of defensiveconflict. The sequence of moves may simulate responses to many kinds of attack and strategies fordefense against a number of attackers, and the control of ones space in Dealing with the direction ofattacks. In different forms a discrete number of movements are put together into intricate sequences andvaried patterns. The practitioner cannot remember only the order of the form. It is more important for him to concentrate on balance, rhythm, breathing control, variation in speed and power control. It is vital to pay attention to these things so that the form is presented as an approach to a livingideal. It would be disrespectful to consider that one knows a form simply by virtue of havingmemorized a series of individual movements. As in all art we perceive greatness and perfection not by the addition of bits and pieces, not by theanalysis of the separate elements that make up the whole, but by a realization that the whole seemsgreater than the parts. That realization is intuitive and instantaneous. Page 28
    • If the practitioner makes us aware that the form consists of parts of individualmovements, then we witness skill, perhaps, but not art form is the mother body oressence of all aspects of technique in the martial arts. The practitioner must, therefore,practice his forms with sincerity and a deep commitment to the ideal. Also, he mustpractice only those forms for which he is mentally and physically prepared. It isunreasonable and presumptuous for a white belt to practice a black belt form. He wouldgain no understanding of the value, purpose, meaning or unity of the form. Furthermore,one of the major aspects of mental development and discipline in our art is the self.Mastery that comes with the habit of accurately perceiving and estimating our individuallevel of competence and achievement. The practitioner who over reaches himself does a disservice to himself and to our art.In summary, to study forms one must be concerned with the application and meaningbehind each movement and technique, both offensive and defensive. Instead ofpracticing each movement within the form by itself, one should find the meaning behindeach movement, the inter-relationship among movements and the reasonableness of eachsequence within a meaningful whole. If one were to disregard the history, value andconcept of forms, one could develop hundreds of forms with the individual movementsavailable. That would be, in effect, an attempt to create new ideals, a differentphilosophy, That would destroy the integrity of our martial art. The body of traditionalforms we have offers more than enough challenge, difficulty and complexity for onelifetime. Each form has its own character, just as each person does. The elements whichmake up the character or personality of a form may be understood as follows: 1. FORM SEQUENCE - The proper and correct sequence of moves in a particular form. 2. POWER CONTROL - Command of the release, restraint and relaxation of ex- plosive energy of focused power. 3. TENSION AND RELAXATION Mastery of breathing and timing in the accumulation and release of energy or power. 4. SPEED AND RNYTHM CONTROL Coordination and patterning of moves at rates appropriate to the sub-sequences within the form. 5. DIRECTION OF MOVEMENTS - Certainty of balance and confidence of step in changing direction. Page 29
    • 6. SPIRIT OR ATTITUDE - Evidence of a sense of calm and humility based on self- knowledge and dedication to the perfect form.7. POWER OF TECHNIQUE - Rigor and strength of moves especially evident in equal power of attack and defense.8. UNDERSTANDING FORM TECHNIQUE - Demonstration in the form that the sequence of moves has been internalized and flows with the naturalness and ease of reflex responses, that is, without the obvious intervention of conscious thought.9. DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE FORM - Evocation in the observer of a vivid awareness of the specific kinds of attack and of the number and direction of attackers for which a particular form is designed.10. PERFECT FINISH - As additional evidence of concentration and control, the last move of the Form ends at the starting point and then remains frozen or fixed there until signaled by the referee, judge or teachers.11. PRECISION OF MOVEMENTS Such accuracy in the execution of a move as reflects the finest Logical coordination of balance, distance, power, ability and control.12. INTENTNESS - Direction and concentration of the entire attention upon points of power. The intent eyes communicate both a determination to defend against attack and a predetermined plan or deliberate design for defense. Further, the eyes anticipate the intended direction of moves by quick shifts and then concentration of focus upon the point of power. These twelve elements may be used as a basis for evaluating a form and for the study of its improved performance. Many people say that the forms are a waste of time, Which they really have nothing to do with your ability to fight. The People who say and think this way do not have an understanding of Martial Arts, for it is by practicing the blocks, strikes, Stances and kicks that you learn how to use them to make them work effectively against an attacker or multiple attackers. Forms are the most effective way of accomplishing this. Page 30
    • Mi Guk Kwan Tang Soo Do Hyungs_(Forms)_ Korean American Counts Motions1. Giecho Hyung Il Bu.……………...…..Basic Form No. 1 20 202. Giecho Hyung Yi Bu………………....Basic Form No. 2 20 203. Giecho Hyung Sahm Bu…………..…Basic Form No. 3 20 204. Pyingahn Cho Dan……………….…..Pyung Form No. 1 20 225. Pyingahn Yi Dan………………..........Pyung Form No. 2 22 296. Pyingahn Sahm Dan…………….….. Pyung Form No. 3 16 247. Pyingahn Sahn Dan……………….…Pyung Form No. 4 20 298. Pyingahn Oe Dan……………….……Pyung Form No. 5 18 259. Bassai……………………………....…Bassai Form (Black Belt) 20 4910. Nai Ahn Chi Cho Dan……………….1st Dan Form No. 1 27 2711. Nai Ahn Chi Yi Dan………………....1st Dan Form No. 2 26 2612. Nai Ahn Chi Sahm Dan…………….2nd Dan Form 27 2713. Sahm Ship Soo………………..….…..Tension Form 20 2714. Chin Toe……………………...………3rd Dan Form 32 4215. Gung San Kung………………………4th Dan Form No. 1 42 6116. Row Hi……………………………..….4th Dan Form No. 2 24 2717. Wanshu………………………….……4th Dan Form No. 318. Seishan…………………………….…..5th Dan Form19. Jion……………………………………6th Dan Form20. O Sip Sa Bo…………………………...7th Dan Form21. Hwa Rang……………………………..8th Dan Form
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