Unfamiliar Text.
Read and show understanding
of unfamiliar texts
Written Text.
Formal
Creative

Prose or poetry
Oral text.
Written transcript of a speech
Script from a stage or radio play
Read the question
and underline the
Formal.
Creates
a formal
tone
Colloquial.
Slang.
Very informal language used to identify
with a particular sub-culture.

Dodgy
Munted

Sweet as
.
Appeals to one or more of the senses
Splash
Rhythmic

Sensory.
Technical language of
a specific profession or group.

Hyperlink

ADSL

Bandwidth

Internet
Simile.
Comparing two
things by using
‘as’ or ‘like’

My memories flash
like lightning in a stormy sky.
Metaphor.
Comparing two things as if they are the same

The wind was a knife with a blade of ice.
Personification.

The phone sat
patiently waiting in quiet anticipation
Alliteration.
Repeating initial consonant sound in nearby words.
Assonance.
Repeating a vowel sound in nearby words.
Onomatopoeia.
Words that imitate the sound they represent
Rhyme.
Repetition of identical or similar
end-sounds in two or more words
The fair breeze blew,
The white foam flew.
The beat or pattern
of words

Free at last,
free at last.
Thank
God Almighty,
We are
Free at last
Personal Pronouns.

You, your
They, them
Creates a connection with the reader
I, like you understand this. We must
ensure our voice is heard.
Create an ‘us’ and ‘them’ separation

They may control us by
spreading their message of fear.
Positive emotional responses

This impressive plan presents an
elegant and visionary solution.
Negative emotional responses
This ridiculous plan demonstrates a
naive and fanatical rigidity.
A direct request
or command

Call now!
Hyperbole.
An exaggeration used for effect.
Repetition.
Deliberately repeating words,
within or between sentences, for effect.

It was scary, very, very scary.
Parallel Structure.
Repeating phrases of similar structure
within or between sentences.

More jobs, more wealth,
more oppo...
Statistics.
Statistics emphasise a point

20% of the world’s population
consume 80% of the world’s resources.
Listing.
Quotations.
Adds supporting information

As Winston Churchill said, “Success is
the ability to go from one failure to
anot...
Anecdote.

The name “All Blacks” goes back to 1905 when...
Hair today, gone tomorrow!
Euphemism.
A polite phrase that is
less offensive than another.

Using ‘he passed away’
Rather than ‘he died’
Superlatives.
Adjectives that indicate the
highest degree of some quality

Most Beautiful
Sarcasm.
Making fun of someone,
often disguised as praise

George Bush, a very eloquent man, once said...
First Person.
When one character tells the story.

I walked...
I cried...
I decided...
Third Person.
Narrator is NOT a character

Sarah walked...
She decided...
The
End.
Unfamiliar text
Unfamiliar text
Unfamiliar text
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Unfamiliar text

  1. 1. Unfamiliar Text. Read and show understanding of unfamiliar texts
  2. 2. Written Text. Formal Creative Prose or poetry
  3. 3. Oral text. Written transcript of a speech Script from a stage or radio play
  4. 4. Read the question and underline the
  5. 5. Formal. Creates a formal tone
  6. 6. Colloquial.
  7. 7. Slang. Very informal language used to identify with a particular sub-culture. Dodgy Munted Sweet as
  8. 8. .
  9. 9. Appeals to one or more of the senses Splash Rhythmic Sensory.
  10. 10. Technical language of a specific profession or group. Hyperlink ADSL Bandwidth Internet
  11. 11. Simile. Comparing two things by using ‘as’ or ‘like’ My memories flash like lightning in a stormy sky.
  12. 12. Metaphor. Comparing two things as if they are the same The wind was a knife with a blade of ice.
  13. 13. Personification. The phone sat patiently waiting in quiet anticipation
  14. 14. Alliteration. Repeating initial consonant sound in nearby words.
  15. 15. Assonance. Repeating a vowel sound in nearby words.
  16. 16. Onomatopoeia. Words that imitate the sound they represent
  17. 17. Rhyme. Repetition of identical or similar end-sounds in two or more words The fair breeze blew, The white foam flew.
  18. 18. The beat or pattern of words Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty, We are Free at last
  19. 19. Personal Pronouns. You, your They, them
  20. 20. Creates a connection with the reader I, like you understand this. We must ensure our voice is heard.
  21. 21. Create an ‘us’ and ‘them’ separation They may control us by spreading their message of fear.
  22. 22. Positive emotional responses This impressive plan presents an elegant and visionary solution.
  23. 23. Negative emotional responses This ridiculous plan demonstrates a naive and fanatical rigidity.
  24. 24. A direct request or command Call now!
  25. 25. Hyperbole. An exaggeration used for effect.
  26. 26. Repetition. Deliberately repeating words, within or between sentences, for effect. It was scary, very, very scary.
  27. 27. Parallel Structure. Repeating phrases of similar structure within or between sentences. More jobs, more wealth, more opportunities.
  28. 28. Statistics. Statistics emphasise a point 20% of the world’s population consume 80% of the world’s resources.
  29. 29. Listing.
  30. 30. Quotations. Adds supporting information As Winston Churchill said, “Success is the ability to go from one failure to another with no loss of enthusiasm.”
  31. 31. Anecdote. The name “All Blacks” goes back to 1905 when...
  32. 32. Hair today, gone tomorrow!
  33. 33. Euphemism. A polite phrase that is less offensive than another. Using ‘he passed away’ Rather than ‘he died’
  34. 34. Superlatives. Adjectives that indicate the highest degree of some quality Most Beautiful
  35. 35. Sarcasm. Making fun of someone, often disguised as praise George Bush, a very eloquent man, once said...
  36. 36. First Person. When one character tells the story. I walked... I cried... I decided...
  37. 37. Third Person. Narrator is NOT a character Sarah walked... She decided...
  38. 38. The End.

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