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Focus on Fruits & Veggies Lunch & Learn

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  • Ask for participant comments on what has worked well for them since the last meeting. Group discussion. Ice Breaker ideas: Ask everyone in the room to briefly state what the word health means to them? As people enter the room, have them write on a post-it what makes them laugh and stick it to a poster board. Then read them aloud before starting the meeting. For smaller groups, have everyone write a random question down on a piece of paper and collect them in a bowl. Then , have everyone pick a question out of the bowl, read it aloud, and answer it in front of the group.
  • Eating fruit provides health benefits. People who eat more vegetables and fruits as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide nutrients vital for health, such as potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin C, and folate (folic acid). Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol. Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as a part of the Fruit Group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen, or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.
  • Examples (of more with potassium): spinach leaves, mushrooms, parsley, chickpeas
  • Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples. Grains are divided into two subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel—the bran, germ, and endosperm. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases.
  • Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley, or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples. Grains are divided into two subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel—the bran, germ, and endosperm. People who eat whole grains as part of a healthy diet have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Be a smart shopper The color of a food is not an indication that it is a whole-grain food. Foods labeled as “multi-grain,” “stone-ground,” “100% wheat,” “cracked wheat,” “seven-grain,” or “bran” are usually not 100% whole-grain products, and may not contain any whole grain.
  • Offer café tour & information on eatcomplete
  • Leave time for participants to ask questions on the presentation as well as prompt them to discuss any barriers, tips to overcome barriers, etc.
  • Transcript

    • 1. HOW TO EATMORE FRUITS&VEGETABLESPresented by Kaylene Buteau, MS
    • 2. Agenda Food group basicsTips for successStaying “in-check” and on track
    • 3. Focus on FruitsKeep visible remindersFor ease of access have a bowl of fruit onthe table, counter, or in the refrigeratorBuy fresh fruits in seasonEat a varietyDried, frozen, canned (in water or 100%juice)Don’t forget fiber!Make most of your choices whole or cut-upfruit rather than juiceSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 4. Focus on Fruits (cont’d)Include a fruit at every mealBreakfast: cereal topper, fruit juice, orfruit mixed with fat-free/low-fat yogurtLunch: pack a tangerine, banana,grapes, or choose fruits from a salad barDinner: add crushed pineapple tocoleslaw, or include orange sections,dried cranberries, or grapes in a tossedsaladSnack on dried fruits in between mealsSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 5. VegetablesBuy fresh vegetables in seasonStock up on frozen vegetables for quickand easy cooking in the microwaveBuy vegetables that are easy to prepareVary your veggiesEat them raw, steamed, or sautéedLook for vegetables with:More potassiumLimit extra sauces and seasoningsReduced sodium in canned itemsSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 6. Vegetables (cont’d)Plan some meals around a vegetable main dishStir-fry, soups, salads, etc.Include chopped vegetables into pasta sauce,lasagna, meatloaf, casseroles, quick breads, ormuffinsGrill vegetable kabobsOrder a veggie pizza and ask for extra veggies!Decorate plates or serving dishes with colorfulvegetables slicesKeep a bowl of cut-up vegetables in a seethrough container in the refrigeratorSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 7. Make ½ your grains whole Make simple switches Substitute whole-grain products for refined-grain 100% whole-wheat breads or bagels, or brown rice Include whole grains in your snacks Popcorn (with little or no added salt or butter) 100% whole-wheat or rye crackers Try whole-wheat versions of your favorite foods: Brown rice in your stir fry Whole-wheat pasta in your lasagna Brown rice stuffing in baked green peppers or tomatoes Whole-wheat macaroni in mac-n-cheeseSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 8. Whole grains (cont’d)Bake up some whole-grain goodness Substitute buckwheat, millet, or oat flour in pancake,waffle, muffin, or other flour-based recipes Cook extra bulgur or barley and freeze half for later as aquick side dishCheck the labels: Good sources of fiber contain 10%-19% of the DailyValue; Excellent sources contain 20% or more! Read the ingredients list and choose products thatname a whole-grain ingredient first on the list Whole wheat, brown rice, bulgur, buckwheat,oatmeal, whole-grain cornmeal, whole oats, wholerye, or wild riceSource: USDA www.ChooseMyPlate.gov
    • 9. The Power of ProteinIncreased satietyContains amino acids for muscle repairPortion size:Use the palm of your hand (withoutfingers) and the thickness of your palmFoods packed with proteinLean meats: skinless poultry, fish andseafood, lean cuts of beef or pork, eggsLow-fat or fat free dairy productsPlant sources of protein: legumes, nuts, &seeds
    • 10. The Facts on Fats Choose monounsaturated &polyunsaturated fatsLimit saturated and trans fatsOmega-3 fatty acidsImportant for absorbing fat soluble vitaminsHealthy FatsFish and fish oilOlive and canola oilsFlaxseeds and flax oilNuts and seeds
    • 11. Eating & ExerciseDon’t exercise on an empty stomachProtein For muscle repairCarbohydrates  For glycogen replacementEat within 30 minutes before and afterexercisefor best results100-150 calories8 oz lowfat milkHard-boiled egg or nut butter & wholegrain crackersHalf a turkey sandwichYogurt or string cheese & fruitEnergy bar with at least 5g protein
    • 12. ModerationDon’t eliminate foods from your dietSubstitute a healthier option MOST of the timeHave them in moderationBaked goodsFatty meatsWhole dairy productsButter and margarineSodas, energy drinks, sports drinks, fruitdrinks, alcoholic beverages
    • 13. ModerationDon’t eliminate foods from your dietSubstitute a healthier option MOST of the timeHave them in moderationBaked goodsFatty meatsWhole dairy productsButter and margarineSodas, energy drinks, sports drinks, fruitdrinks, alcoholic beverages
    • 14. Keys to SuccessEat breakfast within an hour of waking upFocus on fruits and vegetablesMake half of your grains wholeKeep protein as your “side” dishGo lean with proteinTry tracking it!Use whichever type fits into yourlifestyle: paper journal or web journal www.myfooddiary.com www.fitday.com www.mypyramid.gov http://www.livestrong.com/myplate/

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