• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Week 5 pp
 

Week 5 pp

on

  • 249 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
249
Views on SlideShare
249
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Week 5 pp Week 5 pp Presentation Transcript

    • IMPLEMENTING CHANGE INORGANIZATIONSWeek 5 of EDU 675Katura M. Lesane, PhD
    • CHANGESchool leaders who aredetermined to implement acollaborative culture thatsupports differentiationunderstand the processesnecessary for change. Culture-changing habits are employed toreach new levels of achievementand success for stakeholders.
    • Stages of Educator Concern about ChangeAs found in Gregory (2003), Hord, Rutherford, Huling-Austin, & Hall (1987) listseveral states of concern that educators have when new practices are implemented.Non-use – Teachers may not use or implement thestrategies, because they do not possess all of theinformation and knowledge to do so.Effective andongoing staff development and coaching can aidwith this concern.
    • Stages of Educator Concern about Change Cont.As found in Gregory (2003), Hord, Rutherford, Huling-Austin, & Hall (1987) listseveral states of concern that educators have when new practices are implemented.Early-use – Teachers may use the new strategy, but theyhave concerns about their effectiveness. They doubtthemselves and their abilities to differentiate. There isanxiety associated with implementation. Coaching andother professional development strategies that promotecollaboration and support can make teachers feel morecomfortable about differentiating and using newstrategies.
    • Stages of Educator Concern about Change Cont.As found in Gregory (2003), Hord, Rutherford, Huling-Austin, & Hall (1987) listseveral states of concern that educators have when new practices are implemented.Maturing-use – These teachers are not concerned withimplementing differentiation. They understand its use andfeel comfortable. This is not only to the benefit of theirstudents, but it becomes a benefit to other teachers whobenefit from the knowledge these teachers possess.
    • Stages of Educator Concern about Change Cont.As found in Gregory (2003), Hord, Rutherford, Huling-Austin, & Hall (1987) listseveral states of concern that educators have when new practices are implemented.Mastery – These teachers have reached the highest levelof Bloom’s Taxonomy. They are at the evaluation levels.They reflect on their use of differentiation in order toimprove the teaching and learning process. They are ableto process new and effective ways to adjust learning andto develop new strategies based on these reflections.
    • ADOPTER TYPESJust as students vary in their readiness to understand and applyknowledge of skills, adult learners are no different. They tooneed support to effectively implement knowledge. Some peopleare able to adopt ideas and implement change quickly. Othersresist change. Rogers (1995) explains four adopter types andways that they, like students, need support to be successful.Like effective teachers, effective school leaders should assesstheir faculty to determine where people are in terms of adoptingchange.
    • ADOPTER TYPES:INNOVATORSThese people are vocal and willing to try new ideas. Theydive in head first and are more emotional about theiractions. They are open to change and risk taking. Astrong leader who has vision is important to these types.These are people who would benefit from more staffdevelopment on a given topic.
    • ADOPTER TYPES:LEADERSLike innovators, leaders are open to change. Unlikeinnovators, they do not dive in head first. While they aresupportive, they think about the process. They are morecerebral. They need research and feedback to implementchange, but they are willing participants.
    • ADOPTER TYPES:EARLY MAJORITYThese people are more cautious than leaders. They thinkdeeply before implementing new strategies. They are notleaders; they tend to follow. Because of this, they woulddo well to be partnered with leaders. They would benefitfrom a collaborative model.
    • ADOPTER TYPES:LATE MAJORITYThese workers are skeptics. They are stubborn. They mayfollow the directives or rules of the administrator orsuccumb to peer pressure, but implementing these newstrategies is not on their agenda.
    • ADOPTER TYPES:RESISTORSDepending on the environment, these people are isolatedand have no influence on the overall climate of theorganization. They need to be informed and involved tochange their attitude and resistance. They need to be hear.
    • THE CHANGE PROCESSHord, Rutherford, Huling-Austin, and Hall (1987) assert that itis critical to understand the point of view of those involved inthe change effort. As listed in Gregory (2003), Blanchard(1983) suggests that people react in expected ways whenexperiencing change. These ways may include grieving, feelingalone, anger, concern, and feeling overwhelmed. For any ofthese feelings, there are specific practices administrators canimplement to assuage those feelings.
    • THE CHANGE PROCESS CONT.Despite all of the efforts of administrators, there will beproblems with implementing change. The change process maybegin with excitement. People face challenges and theenthusiasm is challenged and diminishes. In some cases, theirenthusiasm becomes obsolete. Leaders must recognize this as aprocess of change and use professional developmentcollaborative models to discuss and solve the problems thatcause this dip in interest and confidence.
    • REFERENCESGregory, G. & Chapman, C. (2007). Differentiated instructional strategies: One size doesn’t fit all.(2nd edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. ISBN: 9781412936408Gregory, G. & Chapman, C. (2008). Differentiated instructional strategies in practice: training,implementation, and supervision (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.ISBN: 9781412936521Reason, C. & Reason, L. (2007). Asking the Right Questions. Educational Leadership, 65(1),36-40. Retrieved from EBSCOHost database.The Critical Thinking Community. (n.d.). The Critical Thinking Community. Retrieved fromhttp://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/about-critical-thinking/1019