Mini lesson samples
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Mini lesson samples

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Here are some sample literature circle mini lessons that can be adapted for centers.

Here are some sample literature circle mini lessons that can be adapted for centers.

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Mini lesson samples Mini lesson samples Document Transcript

  • Mini Lesson Sample 1
    Directions:
    Readers use a variety of “fix-up” strategies to help them when they are reading.
    Discuss a time when you were frustrated by something that have read.
    Copyright 2010
    Katherine S. McKnight
    Permission Granted for Classroom Use
  • Skills and Strategies for Reading
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Skills and Strategies for Reading
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 2
    Character Analysis Chart
    Directions: Review the definition of character. Remind the students about the difference between main and minor characters.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • 2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 3
    Character Traits and Textual Evidence
    • Directions: This chart facilitates students delving deeper into characters’ and motivations.
    Review the different kinds of characters: flat and round characters.
    Have the students select a character from their novel. The students should determine if the character is either flat or round and find details that support their response.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Title:Author:Character’s Name and Main Trait:
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 4
    Character Traits Web
    This activity is designed to help students collect attributes about a character or real-life person.
    Directions: Authors provide direct and indirect clues about what characters are like. Choose a character from the novel and complete the following chart.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Title:Author:
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 5
    Character Map
    This activity offers a way for students to express their understanding by using a visual to interpret a character.
    Directions: The stick figures stands for a character that they select from the text. Discuss the character and log the information.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 6
    Comparing Myself to a Character
    When students make a strong connection to the character and text that they are reading. It leads to greater comprehension.
    Directions: Review the definition of character. Select a character from the novel and complete the following chart.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Title:
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 7
    Plot Diagram visually represents the stages of plot development. Teaching the students about plot helps them to comprehend text.
    Directions: Remind the student that plot is a sequence of events in a story which is built around a conflict.
    Display the chart and instruct the student to complete it as they read the text.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Title:Author:
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 8
    CATAPULT into Literature helps students to preview and make predictions about a text.
    Directions: Read through the chart. Model for the students how to complete the chart using a novel that you recently read.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • CATAPULT into Literature
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 9
    Questioning the Author is a technique that helps students become independent readers. This activity prompts the reader to consider the novel from the writer’s point of view.
    • Directions: Explain to students that one way to understand a difficult text is to think of questions that they would ask the author.
    • Select a passage 1-2 paragraphs long. Model the technique for the students by thinking aloud.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Questioning the Author Sample
    What is the author trying to say here? That is, what is the main message or purpose?
    Is the author expressing clear ideas?
    Is this consistent with what the author already said?
    What does the author think we already know?
    Has the author achieved the goal?
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • Mini Lesson Sample 10
    Reader Response Starters prompt students to respond to literature with more than just superficial knowledge of the basic plot points.
    Directions: Choose a text and read it aloud and model for the students how to complete the response starters.
    2010 Katherine S. McKnight
  • 2010 Katherine S. McKnight