Herb Kelleher pechakucha

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  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herbert Kelleher, former CEO of Southwest Airlines never suited the typical image of an airline industry executive. He earned the title of “Iron Clown” because he took a casual approach to business, chain-smokes like a son of a gun, loves to arm wrestle, but is an admitted workaholic (Jaffe, 1991). His leadership is admirable because of the gusto behind it and the flair of success it ignited in the first ever short-haul airline.\n
  • Herb cofounded SWA with one of his former client. He defended SWA from 3 years worth of lawsuits. Herb was an exceptional leader because he kept people at the core of his leadership strategy, adhered to priorities consistently, and was able to execute positive changes.\n grew into a leader after he learned to manage\n
  • Herb cofounded SWA with one of his former client. He defended SWA from 3 years worth of lawsuits. Herb was an exceptional leader because he kept people at the core of his leadership strategy, adhered to priorities consistently, and was able to execute positive changes.\n grew into a leader after he learned to manage\n
  • Herb cofounded SWA with one of his former client. He defended SWA from 3 years worth of lawsuits. Herb was an exceptional leader because he kept people at the core of his leadership strategy, adhered to priorities consistently, and was able to execute positive changes.\n grew into a leader after he learned to manage\n
  • Herb is considered one of the best CEO’s in the country. Employees had the utmost respect for Herb because they felt truly valued. His inspiring leadership was the catalyst that spurred employees to go above and beyond their job description. Southwest employees designed and built the first automated check-in kiosk using their own time and resources, because they had the support of their leader.\n His leadership inspires employees to go beyond the call of duty\nHe treated his people like they were number one because he believed in the Golden Rule (Bengston, 2007). Employees were able to benefit and grow through the support of the relationship they had with Keller: he successfully fashioned an open corporate culture that did away with the idea of a rigid communication structure. \n \n
  • Herb spent a day each quarter on the front lines to experience almost every position in the company (Hollon, 2008). Kelleher’s attitude and demeanor towards his employees illustrated his belief that a corporation is based on its people. Southwest employees enjoy benefits way above industry standard, the company has a 7% turnover rate, the lowest in the industry.\n understood the demands of the job and conditions through first hand experience\n attitude reflected the fact that he valued employees as the foundation of the corporation\n\n
  • Kelleher was so connected to his employees that he knew many by name; he was deeply respected in return for the relationships he established with all levels of employees. It wasn’t unusual for Kelleher to call on an employee that had fallen ill (Welles, 1992). Kelleher was known for treating his employees like customers and ensuring that they felt taken care of and not like a “cog in the machine(Hollon, 2008).” \n\n
  • Kelleher had a unique hierarchy of priorities; people and safety were tied for the top position, but the priority of people was relayed through the company culture by the employees, all the way down to the customers. Employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity that he established through his actions on behalf of Southwest and the relationships with the people of the company. \n\nSouthwest employees are known to frequently entertain and show how much they care. For instance, thanks to the light-hearted corporate culture laid down by Kelleher, it isn’t uncommon for a flight attendant to recite the safety information as they impersonate Elvis (Frandsen, 2009). Kelleher would often show how deeply he cared for his customers and employees by personally responding to their letters (Welles, 1992).\n employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity demonstrated through his actions and relationships\n
  • Kelleher had a unique hierarchy of priorities; people and safety were tied for the top position, but the priority of people was relayed through the company culture by the employees, all the way down to the customers. Employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity that he established through his actions on behalf of Southwest and the relationships with the people of the company. \n\nSouthwest employees are known to frequently entertain and show how much they care. For instance, thanks to the light-hearted corporate culture laid down by Kelleher, it isn’t uncommon for a flight attendant to recite the safety information as they impersonate Elvis (Frandsen, 2009). Kelleher would often show how deeply he cared for his customers and employees by personally responding to their letters (Welles, 1992).\n employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity demonstrated through his actions and relationships\n
  • Kelleher had a unique hierarchy of priorities; people and safety were tied for the top position, but the priority of people was relayed through the company culture by the employees, all the way down to the customers. Employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity that he established through his actions on behalf of Southwest and the relationships with the people of the company. \n\nSouthwest employees are known to frequently entertain and show how much they care. For instance, thanks to the light-hearted corporate culture laid down by Kelleher, it isn’t uncommon for a flight attendant to recite the safety information as they impersonate Elvis (Frandsen, 2009). Kelleher would often show how deeply he cared for his customers and employees by personally responding to their letters (Welles, 1992).\n employees trusted Kelleher based on his integrity demonstrated through his actions and relationships\n
  • Change and people are the components that allowed Kelleher to lead Southwest to meet the demands of it’s customers. Kelleher empowered his people to initiate change and constantly scrutinize the current system and suggest improvements. Herb often implemented employee suggestions. When there was confusion amongst customers who were throwing away tickets accidentally, Herb went ahead with a simple solution suggested by an employee.\n
  • Change and people are the components that allowed Kelleher to lead Southwest to meet the demands of it’s customers. Kelleher empowered his people to initiate change and constantly scrutinize the current system and suggest improvements. Herb often implemented employee suggestions. When there was confusion amongst customers who were throwing away tickets accidentally, Herb went ahead with a simple solution suggested by an employee.\n
  • Herb’s leadership style developed naturally and became the basis for the company culture, which is remarkable. Love and passion was evident in all of Kelleher’s leadership tactics. Luv and Spirit is how Southwest is differentiated and recognized by customers. The values that Kelleher instilled in the company are the values that create loyal customers, which allowed Southwest to develop into what is today. \n\n
  • Herb’s leadership style developed naturally and became the basis for the company culture, which is remarkable. Love and passion was evident in all of Kelleher’s leadership tactics. Luv and Spirit is how Southwest is differentiated and recognized by customers. The values that Kelleher instilled in the company are the values that create loyal customers, which allowed Southwest to develop into what is today. \n\n
  • Herb’s leadership style developed naturally and became the basis for the company culture, which is remarkable. Love and passion was evident in all of Kelleher’s leadership tactics. Luv and Spirit is how Southwest is differentiated and recognized by customers. The values that Kelleher instilled in the company are the values that create loyal customers, which allowed Southwest to develop into what is today. \n\n
  • Herb’s leadership style developed naturally and became the basis for the company culture, which is remarkable. Love and passion was evident in all of Kelleher’s leadership tactics. Luv and Spirit is how Southwest is differentiated and recognized by customers. The values that Kelleher instilled in the company are the values that create loyal customers, which allowed Southwest to develop into what is today. \n\n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Herb would initiate and accept responsibility for growth, his leadership was driven by what was demanded by the situation (Harvard Business Review, 1996). He controlled the growth of the company by restricting it to a reasonable rate.\nKelleher was able to develop and follow a culture of corporate love based on the trust of his followers (Bengston, 2007). Love is a pillar value for Southwest and it is a huge factor of the company’s success. \n
  • Kelleher made his energy an integral part of the company. The unconventional approach to leadership allowed Kelleher to rely on his strengths as he improved his weaknesses. The combination of Kelleher’s laid-back approach to leadership and his courage to be a non-conformist helped propel Southwest into the position of industry leader. \n\n
  • Kelleher made his energy an integral part of the company. The unconventional approach to leadership allowed Kelleher to rely on his strengths as he improved his weaknesses. The combination of Kelleher’s laid-back approach to leadership and his courage to be a non-conformist helped propel Southwest into the position of industry leader. \n\n
  • Kelleher made his energy an integral part of the company. The unconventional approach to leadership allowed Kelleher to rely on his strengths as he improved his weaknesses. The combination of Kelleher’s laid-back approach to leadership and his courage to be a non-conformist helped propel Southwest into the position of industry leader. \n\n
  • Kelleher developed a standard of accountability for results. He encouraged constant self evaluation, even when the company was doing well. For instance, when the company was exceeding profit forecasts, Herb implemented a reevaluation of the company budget and was able to stop one of the departments from hemorrhaging money.\n\n
  • Kelleher developed a standard of accountability for results. He encouraged constant self evaluation, even when the company was doing well. For instance, when the company was exceeding profit forecasts, Herb implemented a reevaluation of the company budget and was able to stop one of the departments from hemorrhaging money.\n\n
  • Kelleher developed a standard of accountability for results. He encouraged constant self evaluation, even when the company was doing well. For instance, when the company was exceeding profit forecasts, Herb implemented a reevaluation of the company budget and was able to stop one of the departments from hemorrhaging money.\n\n
  • Kelleher did the things that gave high return. When air traffic controllers were on strike, Kelleher made every effort to work the system (within the boundaries of FAA rules) and provide for his company to carry on and remain successful by gaining flight rights, much to the chagrin of Southwest’s competitors (Beddingfield & Loftus, 1998). Kelleher was the only person in the company that could get away with a stunt like that.\n
  • Kelleher did the things that gave high return. When air traffic controllers were on strike, Kelleher made every effort to work the system (within the boundaries of FAA rules) and provide for his company to carry on and remain successful by gaining flight rights, much to the chagrin of Southwest’s competitors (Beddingfield & Loftus, 1998). Kelleher was the only person in the company that could get away with a stunt like that.\n
  • Kelleher did the things that gave high return. When air traffic controllers were on strike, Kelleher made every effort to work the system (within the boundaries of FAA rules) and provide for his company to carry on and remain successful by gaining flight rights, much to the chagrin of Southwest’s competitors (Beddingfield & Loftus, 1998). Kelleher was the only person in the company that could get away with a stunt like that.\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Kelleher communicated Southwest’s vision of providing the “highest quality of Customer Service delivered with a sense of warmth, friendliness, individual pride, and Company Spirit” through leading by example.\nBeing a change agent allowed Kelleher to navigate the uncertain waters of the airline industry and, combined with his tenacity, provided for Southwest to become a champion.\n\n
  • Herb made decisions that may have been difficult, but made a difference. After an article that questioned the safety of Southwest planes, Herb took the initiative to review the safety of their aircraft, only to find that it wasn’t compromised (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). Herb initiated a working collaboration with the Boeing Company to increase safety on future models (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). This incident reinforced an even deeper company wide commitment to safety.\n
  • Herb made decisions that may have been difficult, but made a difference. After an article that questioned the safety of Southwest planes, Herb took the initiative to review the safety of their aircraft, only to find that it wasn’t compromised (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). Herb initiated a working collaboration with the Boeing Company to increase safety on future models (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). This incident reinforced an even deeper company wide commitment to safety.\n
  • Herb made decisions that may have been difficult, but made a difference. After an article that questioned the safety of Southwest planes, Herb took the initiative to review the safety of their aircraft, only to find that it wasn’t compromised (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). Herb initiated a working collaboration with the Boeing Company to increase safety on future models (Kelleher, FAA oversight of airline safety, n.d.). This incident reinforced an even deeper company wide commitment to safety.\n
  • Building relationships was a strength that Herb leaned on as he developed as a leader when he was unceremoniously dubbed CEO. As a lawyer, Kelleher helped Southwest wage courtroom battles that nearly nipped the project in the bud before it was even off the ground. People followed him because they knew about him as a founder and gladiator on behalf of the start-up company.\n\n\n
  • Building relationships was a strength that Herb leaned on as he developed as a leader when he was unceremoniously dubbed CEO. As a lawyer, Kelleher helped Southwest wage courtroom battles that nearly nipped the project in the bud before it was even off the ground. People followed him because they knew about him as a founder and gladiator on behalf of the start-up company.\n\n\n
  • Building relationships was a strength that Herb leaned on as he developed as a leader when he was unceremoniously dubbed CEO. As a lawyer, Kelleher helped Southwest wage courtroom battles that nearly nipped the project in the bud before it was even off the ground. People followed him because they knew about him as a founder and gladiator on behalf of the start-up company.\n\n\n
  • Building relationships was a strength that Herb leaned on as he developed as a leader when he was unceremoniously dubbed CEO. As a lawyer, Kelleher helped Southwest wage courtroom battles that nearly nipped the project in the bud before it was even off the ground. People followed him because they knew about him as a founder and gladiator on behalf of the start-up company.\n\n\n
  • Building relationships was a strength that Herb leaned on as he developed as a leader when he was unceremoniously dubbed CEO. As a lawyer, Kelleher helped Southwest wage courtroom battles that nearly nipped the project in the bud before it was even off the ground. People followed him because they knew about him as a founder and gladiator on behalf of the start-up company.\n\n\n
  • Based on his leadership accomplishments, Herb is definitely at the level of production, as proven by previous examples. People followed Herb because of what he had done for them and the company. Employees sensed his success, and liked him and what he did. Problems were resolved with minimum effort because of the momentum Herb started.\n
  • Based on his leadership accomplishments, Herb is definitely at the level of production, as proven by previous examples. People followed Herb because of what he had done for them and the company. Employees sensed his success, and liked him and what he did. Problems were resolved with minimum effort because of the momentum Herb started.\n
  • Based on his leadership accomplishments, Herb is definitely at the level of production, as proven by previous examples. People followed Herb because of what he had done for them and the company. Employees sensed his success, and liked him and what he did. Problems were resolved with minimum effort because of the momentum Herb started.\n
  • Based on his leadership accomplishments, Herb is definitely at the level of production, as proven by previous examples. People followed Herb because of what he had done for them and the company. Employees sensed his success, and liked him and what he did. Problems were resolved with minimum effort because of the momentum Herb started.\n
  • Based on his leadership accomplishments, Herb is definitely at the level of production, as proven by previous examples. People followed Herb because of what he had done for them and the company. Employees sensed his success, and liked him and what he did. Problems were resolved with minimum effort because of the momentum Herb started.\n
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  • Herb Kelleher pechakucha

    1. 1. THE LEADER OF Katie-Lee Read
    2. 2. HERBERT KELLEHER
    3. 3. HERBERT KELLEHER
    4. 4. HERBERT KELLEHER
    5. 5. HERBERT KELLEHERCo-Founder ofSouthwest AirlinesDefended SWA from3 years worth oflawsuitsCEO 1982-2001
    6. 6. HERB ‘S HIS PEOPLE
    7. 7. HERB ‘S HIS PEOPLE
    8. 8. HERB ‘S HIS PEOPLE
    9. 9. PRIORITIES
    10. 10. PRIORITIES
    11. 11. HERB THE CHANGE AGENT
    12. 12. HERB THE CHANGE AGENT Empowered people to initiate and own the change Often implemented employees suggestions
    13. 13. HERB THE CHANGE AGENT
    14. 14. HERB THE CHANGE AGENTInfectious attitudeDifferentiated bycultureCreated lastingcompany values There has never been more love in the air.
    15. 15. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP
    16. 16. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPInitiate and accept responsibility forgrowthDevelop and follow a company culture
    17. 17. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPInitiate and accept responsibility forgrowthDevelop and follow a company culture
    18. 18. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPInitiate and accept responsibility forgrowthDevelop and follow a company cultureMade his energy an integral part of thecompany
    19. 19. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPInitiate and accept responsibility forgrowthDevelop and follow a company cultureMade his energy an integral part of thecompany
    20. 20. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPInitiate and accept responsibility forgrowthDevelop and follow a company cultureMade his energy an integral part of thecompanyDevelop accountability for results
    21. 21. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIP
    22. 22. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPDid the things that give a high return
    23. 23. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPDid the things that give a high return
    24. 24. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPDid the things that give a high returnCommunicated the vision of SouthwestBeing a change agent
    25. 25. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPDid the things that give a high returnCommunicated the vision of SouthwestBeing a change agent
    26. 26. SUCCESSFUL LEADERSHIPDid the things that give a high returnCommunicated the vision of SouthwestBeing a change agentMade decisions that may have beendifficult, but made a difference
    27. 27. FIVE LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP
    28. 28. FIVE LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP Personhood People Development Production PermissionPosition
    29. 29. FIVE LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP Personhood People Development Production PermissionPosition
    30. 30. FIVE LEVELS OF LEADERSHIP Production
    31. 31. REFERENCES • Bengston, T. (2007). The L word. The Financial Review . • Frandsen, B. M. (2009 йил September). Fostering effective work relationships. LTL Magazine . • Harvard Business Review. (1996 йил May-June). Whats personality got to do with it? Harvard Business Review . •!Hollon, J. (2008). It aint rocket science. Workforce Management . •!Jaffe, C. (1991). Moving fast by standing still. Nations Business , 79 (10). •!Kelleher, H. (n.d.). FAA oversight of airline safety. FDCH Congressional Testimony. •!Kelleher, H. (1995 йил January). Unorthodoxy at Work. (B. Lee, Interviewer) •!Lieber, R. (1998). Why employees love these companies. Fortun , 137 (1), pp. 72-74. •!Loftus, K. B. (1998). Americas funniest flyboy. U.S. News & World Report , 125 (24). •!Marchetti, M. (2005). Stepping in for Superman. Fast Company , 98. •!Spreitzer, G. M. (2006). Learning to grow and growing to lead. Organizational Dynamics . •!Welles, E. O. (1992). Captain marvel. Inc. , 14 (1). •!Wheat, A. (2001). The chairman of the board looks back. Fortune .•
    32. 32. MULTIMEDIA REFERENCEShttp://www.flickr.com/photos/10037058@N08/3862651602/sizes/z/in/photostream/http://pictopia.com/perl/get_image?provider_id=40&size=550x550_mb&ptp_photo_id=5877562http://newsinfo.iu.edu/pub/libs/images/usr/764_h.jpghttp://www.window.state.tx.us/comptrol/fnotes/fn0905/stability.htmlhttp://www.rightattitudes.com/blogincludes/images/20080912_herb_kelleher_southwest_airlines_respect_people.jpghttp://cache2.asset-cache.net/xc/50821178.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=2&d=77BFBA49EF878921F7C3FC3F69D929FD5C6EF5C3A7BCE6AFBA13B68E8DB1BB248CD10B20311B189FF06BF04B24B4128Chttp://www.airwaysmag.com/channel/images/special_reports/southwest_airlines/DSCF2153.jpghttp://blog.cleveland.com/business/2009/04/large_southwest-ny.jpghttp://img.timeinc.net/time/photoessays/2008/herb_kelleher/kelleher_01.jpghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxTFA1kh1m8
    33. 33. THANK YOU

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