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Serving Latino Children and Families - Bibliography
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Serving Latino Children and Families - Bibliography

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A bibliography to supplement the presentation by Katie Cunningham at the 2011 McConnell Conference titled "Serving Latino Children and Families in Kentucky Libraries."

A bibliography to supplement the presentation by Katie Cunningham at the 2011 McConnell Conference titled "Serving Latino Children and Families in Kentucky Libraries."

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  • 1. Serving Latino Children and Families in Kentucky – Bibliography<br />Katie Cunningham, Children’s Librarian, Lexington Public Library – Village Branch<br />McConnell Conference, February 25 – 26, 2011<br />Easy Picture Books<br />Ada, Alma Flor. Let Me Help! = ¡Quiero ayudar! 2010.<br />A pet parrot tries to help his human family prepare for the Cinco de Mayo festivities in San Antonio, Texas.<br />Colato-Laínez, René. My Shoes and I. 2010.<br />As Mario and his Papá travel from El Salvador to the United States to be reunited with Mamá, Mario's wonderful new shoes help to distract him from the long and difficult journey.<br />Hudes, Quiara Alegría. Welcome to My Neighborhood: A Barrio ABC. 2010. Also in Spanish as ¡Bienvenidos a mi barrio! Mi mundo de la A a la Z.<br />A young girl takes a walk through her urban neighborhood, observing items representing every letter of the alphabet, from her abuela to loud, zooming cars.<br />Tafolla, Carmen. Fiesta Babies. 2010<br />Through gentle rhyming text, a parade of multicultural babies and toddlers in vibrantly colored costumes sing, dance and celebrate at a local fiesta. <br />Tonatiuh, Duncan. Dear Primo: A Letter to My Cousin. 2010<br />Two cousins, one in Mexico and one in New York City, write to each other and learn that even though their daily lives differ, at heart the boys are very similar.<br />Older Picture Books<br />Ancona, George. Olé, Flamenco! 2010.<br />Introduces the dancing, singing, and guitar playing of flamenco, exploring details of the art form, which draws on traditions from various cultures, and focuses on the study of the form by Janira Cordova, a young member of a company in Santa Fe, New Mexico.<br />Brown, Monica. Side by Side : The Story of Dolores Huerta and Cesar Chavez = Lado a lado: La historia de Dolores Huerta y César Chávez. 2010.<br />Describes the partnership between Dolores Huerta and César Cháves, the founding of the National Farm Workers Association, and their combined efforts to improve working conditions for agricultural laborers.<br />Colato-Laínez, René. From North to South = Del Norte al Sur. 2010.<br />When his mother is sent back to Mexico for not having the proper immigration papers, José and his father travel from San Diego, California, to visit her in Tijuana.<br />González, Lucía. The Storyteller’s Candle = La velita de los cuentos. 2008.<br />During the early days of the Great Depression, New York City's first Puerto Rican librarian, Pura Belpré, introduces the public library to immigrants living in El Barrio and hosts the neighborhood's first Three Kings' Day fiesta.<br />Novesky, Amy. Me, Frida. 2010.<br />Artist Frida Kahlo finds her own voice and style when her famous husband, Diego Rivera, is commissioned to paint a mural in San Francisco, California, in the 1930s and she finds herself exploring the city on her own.<br />Juvenile Chapter Books<br />Alvarez, Julia. Return to Sender. 2009.<br />After his family hires migrant Mexican workers to help save their Vermont farm from foreclosure, eleven-year-old Tyler befriends the oldest daughter, but when he discovers they may not be in the country legally, he realizes that real friendship knows no borders. Winner of the 2010 Pura Belpré Award for narrative.<br />Cervantes, Jennifer. Tortilla Sun. 2010.<br />While spending a summer in New Mexico with her grandmother, twelve-year-old Izzy makes new friends, learns to cook, and for the first time hears stories about her father, who died before she was born.<br />Gonzalez, Christina Diaz. The Red Umbrella. 2010.<br />In 1961 after Castro has come to power in Cuba, fourteen-year-old Lucia and her seven-year-old brother are sent to the United States when her parents, who are not in favor of the new regime, fear that the children will be taken away from them as others have been.<br />López, Diana. Confetti Girl. 2009.<br />After the death of her mother, Texas sixth-grader Lina's grades and mood drop as she watches her father lose himself more and more in books, while her best friend uses Lina as an excuse to secretly meet her boyfriend.<br />Resau, Laura. Star in the Forest. 2010.<br />After eleven-year-old Zitlally's father is deported to Mexico, she takes refuge in her trailer park's forest of rusted car parts, where she befriends a spunky neighbor and finds a stray dog that she nurses back to health and believes she must keep safe so that her father will return.<br />

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