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R M S T I T L E I P L A N

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  • 1. Title I Schoolwide Program Roscommon Middle School Gerrish- Higgins School District Kathy Rees, District Title I Director Ronald J. Alden, Principal Nancy Root, Counselor Rosemarie Farrell, Title I Building Leadership Team Rebecca Yaske, Title I Building Leadership Team Lauri Cook, Parent Advisory Committee Valerie Doebler, Parent Advisory Committee 2008/2009
  • 2. Table of Contents 1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment ……………………………………………………… 3 2. Schoolwide Reform Strategies ……………………………………………………………… 6 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Professional Staff (Teachers and Instructional Paraprofessionals) …………………………………………….………………………………… 12 4. Strategies to Attract High-Quality Highly Qualified Teachers to High Need Schools ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13 5. High Quality and Ongoing Professional Development …………………………. 13 6. Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement ………………………………………. 15 7. Preschool Transition Strategies ……………………………………………………………. 18 8. Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions ………………………. 19 9. Timely and Additional Assistance to Students Having Difficulty Mastering the Standards …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 2|Page
  • 3. 10. Coordination and Integration of Federal, State and Local Programs and Resources ………………………………………………………………………………………….... 20 11. Evaluation ………………………………………………………………………………………..… 22 Appendix ...…………………………………………………………………………………………… 23 1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) The Title I Building Leadership Team completed the School Improvement Comprehensive Needs Assessment provided by the Michigan State Department of Education to compile and evaluate the four measures of school data. This information was used to evaluate the overall effectiveness of Roscommon Middle School’s Schoolwide Plan. The data collected was used to formulate conclusions in the following four areas: A. Student Achievement Data B. Demographic Data C. School Programs D. Perceptions Data A. Student Achievement Data The Comprehensive Needs Assessment highlighted Roscommon Middle School’s academic strengths and weaknesses. One of the strengths is that Roscommon Middle School’s overall general education population showed consistent progress on the Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) in the areas Math, English Language Arts (ELA), and Science. (See Figure 1) Another strength for Roscommon Middle School is meeting Michigan’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Targets in Math and ELA as outlined by the Michigan Department of Education in conjunction with the No Child Left Behind legislation. Two areas of weakness that were discovered 3|Page
  • 4. when disseminating the MEAP data include the students with disabilities subgroup and the gender subgroup. Figure 1 Grade Level Achievement –School Level Data Year: 2007/2008 % of Population Demonstrating Proficiency of GLCE/HSCE* Grade ACS** % HQ ELA Math Science Social Studies *** # % # % # % # % 5 100 76% 100 77% 100 84% 6 100 78% 100 83% 100 73% 7 114 87% 114 84% 8 136 87% 136 85% 136 89% Additional data sources used to influence the decision making process about student achievement includes Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) assessment, the AIMS/Web oral reading fluency assessment, and the MAZE reading comprehension assessment. The first area of concern includes the fact that less than 75% of Roscommon Middle School students are performing at grade level on the NWEA’s math and reading MAP assessment. (See Appendix A) Another major area of concern after analyzing the AIMS/Web and MAZE results from fall of 2007 to fall of 2008, is that the lowest performing students are remaining in the deficient category in both oral reading fluency and reading comprehension. B. Demographic Data When analyzing Roscommon Middle School’s demographic data, it became clear that there were strengths and weaknesses within the subgroups. It was found that students who have been in the Gerrish-Higgins School District since first grade were over 80% proficient on the MEAP in the areas of Math and ELA. (See Figure 2) Figure 2 Continuity of Instructional Program Highest grade level in building # of % of students % of students % of students % of students 8th grade Students proficient proficient proficient proficient ELA Math Social Studies Science Students who have been in 86 84% 81% the building since 1st grade 4|Page
  • 5. Student who moved into the 50 66% 62% building after 1st grade A major area of concern includes the fact that the majority of Roscommon Middle School’s students with disabilities are not proficient on the MEAP in any area that is assessed. Another area of concern includes the fact that our female population consistently outperforms the male population on most tested areas of the MEAP. (See Appendices B1-B4) C. School Programs Based on the needs assessment, the following focus areas have been identified for the 2008-2009 school year: • Improving math skills for all students • Improving oral reading fluency for all students • Improving reading comprehension for all students Schoolwide Program Goals Goal Area # 1 Math 75% or more of Roscommon Middle School students will achieve grade level status in math as assessed by NWEA’s Math MAP assessment Goal Area # 2 Oral Reading Fluency 75% or more of Roscommon Middle School students will achieve benchmark status as measured by the AIMS/Web oral reading fluency assessment Goal Area #3 Reading Comprehension 75% or more of Roscommon Middle School students will achieve benchmark status as measured by the MAZE reading comprehension assessment and NWEA’S Reading Map assessment 5|Page
  • 6. D. Perception Data After completing the CNA, it became clear that Roscommon Middle School must formalize the way in which it collects perception data from students, parents, staff, and community. This year, eighth grade students will complete an exit survey that will evaluate their feelings about academic expectations and their Roscommon Middle School experience. Parents of these students will also have an opportunity to share their own perceptions of Roscommon Middle School as it relates to their child’s middle school learning experience. In the summer of 2007, Roscommon Middle School became part of the Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSI). Through this initiative, a Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) survey asks teachers to rank their schools implementation of this initiative to improve student behavior. The MiBLSI team, three times a year also completes an Effective Behavior Support Survey that helps the team assess and plan any changes necessary to improve reading instruction and student behavior. Staff has always had informal input into our schoolwide plan, but after completion of the CNA it became evident that this information must be collected in a more formal fashion. The Title I Building Leadership Team will create a survey for collecting staff perceptions. The survey will include their perceptions regarding student expectations, instructional program unity, and support and effectiveness of leadership. Roscommon Middle School’s summer program currently uses an entrance and exit survey to inform teaching staff of the effectiveness of its’ program. This information is used to modify the summer school program to meet the needs of each individual learner. The Title I Building Leadership Team will survey community members who have direct contact with school activities and members. Survey questions will address different aspects of the school setting such as student expectations and overall tone of the Roscommon Middle School. 2. Schoolwide Reform Strategies 6|Page
  • 7. Goal Area #1 Math SMART Goal 1 By May of 2009, Roscommon Middle School students will show a 10% improvement in math skills as measured by the NWEA Math MAP assessment Rationale and Supporting 1. NWEA Math MAP scores show that less than 68% of Data 5th to 8th grade students are grade level proficient 2. MEAP Item Analysis showed a schoolwide deficit in geometry skills Standardized Assessments 1. NWEA Math MAP Test, beginning and end of school used to measure goal year(schoolwide) 2. MEAP-Math (Fall) Local Assessments used to 1. Teacher Observations measure goal 2. Curriculum and performance assessments Instructional Strategy 1 Teachers will model and instruct students in specific concepts of geometry that relate to grade level content expectations Research to support strategy The University of Chicago School Mathematics Project and activities (USCMP), McGraw Hill Wright Group Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Activities  Teachers will provide multiple exposures to targeted grade level geometry concepts  Students will be able to draw and solve problems about geometric shapes and figures  Students will understand and apply geometric properties 7|Page
  • 8. Students experiencing  Extended time to practice geometry skills difficulty attaining proficiency  Small group instruction specifically targeted for will be provided with the learning disabled students and those at risk following accommodations and interventions  Title I Intervention Program for at risk students to aid reinforcement of skills and assist mastery of strategies to increase geometry knowledge  After school tutoring program for at risk students and students who have moved into the district  Summer School Program Professional Development  Best Practices  Grade level meetings  Curriculum Planning Meetings  Professional Learning Committees (PLC’s)  Michigan Mathematics Rural Initiative (M2RI) Evidence and Documentation  Unit Assessments  NWEA MAP Math Assessment  Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives  Formative assessments Resources  Everyday Math, McGraw Hill  Pre-Algebra, McDougal Littell  Algebra, McDougal Littell  Accelerated Math, Renaissance Learning  Math Facts in a Flash, Renaissance Learning  Classworks, Knowledge Adventure 8|Page
  • 9. Goal Area #2 Oral Reading Fluency SMART Goal By May of 2009, Roscommon Middle School students will show a 10% improvement in oral reading fluency skills as measured by the AIMS/WEB assessment Rationale and Supporting 1. Less than 64% of Roscommon Middle School Students Data are performing at benchmark status as measured by the AIMS/WEB oral reading fluency assessment 2. Lowest performing students are remaining in deficient category Instructional Strategy 1 Teachers will model and instruct students on how to read fluently Standardized Assessments 1. AIMS/WEB trimester assessment (schoolwide) and used to measure goal progress monitoring as needed Local Assessments used to 1. Weekly teacher observations measure goal Research to support What Really Matters for Struggling Readers, Richard L. strategy and activities Allington Reading Excellence: Word Attack and Rate Development Strategies, Anita Archer Diagnostic Teaching of Reading: Techniques for Instruction and Assessment, Barbara J. Walker Activities  Teachers will demonstrate fluency using read alouds across the curriculum  Students will practice fluency using paired reading with various texts  Students will use the repeated readings strategy to 9|Page
  • 10. improve oral reading fluency Activities, continued  Students will be taught how to choose appropriate leveled texts for independent reading time based on lexile results from NWEA Reading MAP Test data Students experiencing  Extended time to practice fluency difficulty attaining  Small group instruction proficiency will be provided with the  Title I Intervention Program for at risk students using following accommodations Read Naturally software program and REWARDS in a and interventions small group setting  Weekly progress monitoring for students in the deficient category Professional Development  Best Practices  Grade level meetings  Curriculum Planning Meetings  Professional Learning Committees (PLC’s) Evidence and  AIMS/WEB assessment Documentation  Teacher observations Resources  Read Naturally software, Read Naturally, Inc.  REWARDS, Anita Archer  Bringing Title I Struggling Readers up to Grade Level, Tim Rasinski 10 | P a g e
  • 11. Goal Area #3 Reading Comprehension SMART Goal By May of 2009, Roscommon Middle School students will show a 10% improvement in reading comprehension skills as measured by the MAZE assessment Rationale and Supporting 1. Less than 68% of Roscommon Middle School Students Data are performing at benchmark status as measured by the MAZE reading comprehension assessment 2. Lowest performing students are remaining in the deficient category 3. Less than 74% of RMS students are performing at grade level as measured by the NWEA Reading MAP assessment 4. Less than 58% of students with disabilities are proficient on the reading MEAP assessment Instructional Strategy 1 Teachers will model and instruct students on how to increase reading comprehension in the areas of science, social studies, English language arts, and math. Standardized 1. MAZE trimester assessment (schoolwide) and progress Assessments used to monitoring as needed measure goal 2. NWEA Reading MAP Test, beginning and end of school year (schoolwide) 3. MEAP-Reading (Fall) Local Assessments used 1. Teacher observations to measure goal 2. Curriculum and performance assessments Research to support What Really Matters for Struggling Readers, Richard L. Allington strategy and activities Michigan Content Literacy Assessments, Standards, and 11 | P a g e
  • 12. Strategies (MiCLASS), Macomb Intermediate School District Research to support Diagnostic Teaching of Reading: Techniques for Instruction and strategy and activities, Assessment, Barbara J. Walker continued Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement, Ann Goudvis and Stephanie Harvey Activities  Teachers will model and instruct students in a specific reading strategy aimed at improving comprehension of content material. 5th Grade: Think, Pair, Share 6th Grade: It Says, I Say, and So 7th Grade: REAP (Read, Encode, Annotate, Ponder) 8th Grade: Word Study: Developing Content Vocabulary  Students will apply the strategy when reading for information within content area classes.  Teachers will model and instruct students on identifying key words necessary to facilitate comprehension within content reading material Students experiencing  Extended time to practice comprehension difficulty attaining  Small group instruction specifically targeted for learning proficiency will be disabled students and those at risk provided with the following  Title I Intervention Program for at risk students to aid accommodations and reinforcement of skills and assist mastery of strategies to interventions increase reading comprehension skills  Weekly progress monitoring for students in the deficient category  After school tutoring program for at risk students and students who have moved into the district  Summer School Program Professional  Best Practices Development 12 | P a g e
  • 13.  Grade level meetings Professional  Curriculum Planning Meetings Development, continued  Professional Learning Committees (PLC’s) Evidence and  MAZE Reading Comprehension Assessment Documentation  MEAP-Reading (Fall)  Teacher Observations  Unit Assessments  Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives  NWEA MAP Reading Assessment Resources  Bringing Title I Struggling Readers up to Grade Level, Tim Rasinski  Scott Forseman Reading Street Reading Program  Growing Literacy, Genre Units, Macomb Intermediate School District  Classworks, Knowledge Adventure  M-ss-ing L-nks, Sunburst Technology Corporation  Accelerated Reader, Renaissance Learning 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Professional Staff (Teachers and Paraprofessionals) All teachers at Roscommon Middle School are highly qualified and state certified for their assigned teaching positions. Roscommon Middle School paraprofessionals meet 13 | P a g e
  • 14. the No Child Left Behind requirements for instructional paraprofessional staff through completion of the Work Keys Certification program. 4. Strategies to Attract High-Quality Highly Qualified Teachers to High Need Schools For the past two years, Roscommon Middle School’s teacher turnover rate is less than 1%. 75% of the Roscommon Middle School staff has been teaching for more than nine years, and 91% of said staff has been teaching in the middle school for more than four years. (See Figure 3) Of the teaching staff at Roscommon Middle School, 69% hold a Master’s Degree. Figure 3 Questions # Teachers 0-3 years 4-8 years 9-15 years >15 years 1. Indicate how long teachers have been 32 2 6 13 11 teaching. 2. Indicate the number of years, each of 3 5 13 11 the teachers has been assigned to this school. Gerrish-Higgins School District incorporates a variety of continuing education opportunities in order to maintain our high quality teachers. To maintain our high quality of education, professional teaching staff members who join the Roscommon Middle School team are mentored by veteran teachers. District-wide ongoing professional development opportunities are offered by the Gerrish-Higgins School District and the Crawford, Ogemaw, Oscoda, and Roscommon (COOR) Intermediate School District (ISD). In addition, the COOR ISD has established the COOR Coordinated Council for Professional Development (CCCPD) which offers a series of professional development opportunities aimed at improving student learning across the curriculum. 5. High-quality and Ongoing Professional Development The Gerrish-Higgins School District plans and implements 32 hours of the state required 35 professional development hours for the professional staff. During the 2008/2009 school year, the COOR ISD and CCCPD retained Dr. Paul Slocumb from the 14 | P a g e
  • 15. aha! Process, Inc. to present Parts I and II: Ruby Payne’s A Framework for Understanding Poverty. This professional development opportunity works to increase staff members understanding of the impact of poverty on education. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment for Roscommon Middle School shows that more that 55% of its students are economically disadvantaged. This presentation enabled staff members to employ the tools and strategies presented to positively impact student learning within this economically disadvantaged subgroup. Roscommon Middle School staff members are involved with additional professional development opportunities aimed at achieving the schoolwide math and reading program goals. The math curriculum team at Roscommon Middle School has participated in the Michigan Mathematics Rural Initiative (M2RI) for the past four years. This initiative focused on algebra and geometry content and pedagogy appropriate for grade sixth through eighth, with an emphasis on technology that can be carried over into the classroom. Roscommon Middle School joined the Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSI) in an effort to improve the reading skills of its middle school students. Being a part of MiBLSI has given the Roscommon Middle School staff various types of professional development opportunities to help achieve the two reading goals set by the Title I Building Leadership Team. For example, Read Naturally and Reading Excellence: Word Attack and Rate Development Strategies (REWARDS) has been adopted by the middle school to improve students’ oral reading fluency rate and reading comprehension. Through MiBLSI, Roscommon Middle School has been trained to use the AIMS/Web oral reading fluency and MAZE reading comprehension data to influence reading instruction decisions within the general education teacher population. The MiBLSI team members meet semi-annually to review schoolwide data and use this information to revise current reading goals. Training was provided through MiBLSI for staff members to participate in Anita Archer’s “Dynamic Vocabulary Instruction: Effective Practices for Intermediate and Middle School Students” workshop. The Title I Building Leadership Team Teachers have received Michigan Content Literacy Assessments, Standards, and Strategies (MiCLASS) training to enhance the reading strategy awareness knowledge with the Roscommon Middle School’s Title I population. This training gives participants the knowledge and skills necessary to 15 | P a g e
  • 16. increase student reading comprehension through the use of intensive reading strategy instruction. Title I teachers were also given the professional development opportunity to participate in Project Read Training. This training supports student learning by providing reading instruction that is structured, systematic and multisensory. This program allows students to become better readers by tapping into their individual learning styles. Another professional development workshop Title I teachers attended was Tim Rasinski’s “Bringing Title I Struggling Readers up to Grade Level”. This program showed staff how to incorporate classroom-tested strategies for boosting vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension across the curriculum. 6. Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement Roscommon Parental Involvement Policy The staff at Roscommon Middle School believes that schools clearly work best when parents are involved in their children’s education. Based on Joyce L. Epstein’s research, which shows that parental involvement is a critical component of the learning process, Roscommon Middle School strives to involve parents in every aspect of their child’s education.  Roscommon Middle School parents are involved in the design, implementation, and evaluation of the schoolwide plan.  Parents are invited to attend the annual Title I meeting held at the beginning of each school year. This meeting informs parents of the Title I program and services offered by Roscommon Middle School.  Roscommon Middle School has a Parent Advisory Committee that meets monthly with the Title I Building Leadership Team to discuss components of the schoolwide plan. Discussion topics include annual review of the comprehensive needs assessment, development of academic goals, plan and review school activities, and evaluate effectiveness of parental involvement in regards to the schoolwide plan. Parents have input on the plan through the Parent Advisory Committee, administrators, staff, and various parent surveys administered throughout the school year.  The Parent Advisory Committee in conjunction with the Roscommon Middle School’s Title I Building Leadership Team will annually evaluate the Parental 16 | P a g e
  • 17. Involvement Plan. The purpose of this evaluation is to identify barriers to greater participation and devise strategies to increase parental involvement.  Roscommon Middle School will gauge the effectiveness of schoolwide events by offering parents the opportunity to provide feedback on an evaluation form regarding parent/student activities. This information will be used by the Parent Advisory Committee and the Title I Building Leadership Team to determine if certain activities should continue or be modified to improve parental involvement.  Roscommon Middle School has a Parental Involvement Mission Statement and a Parent/Student/Teacher Compact that addresses the true partnership for learning that exists between home and school. (See Appendix C1 and C2) This compact was developed using survey data obtained from parents, students, and teachers. In the spring, representatives from each stakeholder group will review their portion of the compact and make suggested revisions. This compact is used annually at parent/teacher conferences to focus on the responsibilities of each stakeholder in order to improve student achievement and address schoolwide goals. Activities Roscommon Middle School employs a variety of activities that reflect the six standard areas developed by Joyce Epstein to meet the strategies to increase parental involvement in accordance with section 1118 (e), sections 1-5, and section 14 of the No Child Left Behind legislation. Section 1118 (e) section 1/Standard I - Communicating: Roscommon Middle School personnel assist parents in understanding the state’s content standards assessments and how to monitor their child’s progress in the following ways: • Roscommon Middle School uses the MDE’s Parent Report to help parents understand their child’s MEAP scores and to monitor their progress in 17 | P a g e
  • 18. mastering state grade level expectations. This report is a tool parents and teachers can use to analyze and plan for differentiated instruction. Section 1118 (e) section 2/Standard 2 - Parenting: Roscommon Middle School Counselors and staff provide materials and training to help parents work with their children in the following ways: • “The Middle School Years: Working together for school success” flyer which is a publication from Resources for Educators. This flyer is sent home monthly and informs parents about different topics that are related to parenting middle school students. • Parents have access to a loaning library which consists of books that are related to many different topics that can help families cope with personal challenges that affect their middle school children. Some examples include divorce issues, family crisis, substance abuse and homework. • Counselors and professional staff conduct one on one conferences to help parents work effectively with their children, and provide referrals to community resources as needed. Section 1118 (e) section 3/Standard I - Communicating: The staff at Roscommon Middle School has been trained to build effective parent involvement through the presentation of Ruby Payne’s “A Framework for Understanding Poverty” professional development series. Section 1118 (e) section 4/Standard – Standard IV – Collaborating with Community: Roscommon Middle School collaborates with other programs to coordinate parent involvement in the following ways: • Catholic Human Services provides a student assistance program which utilizes small group settings to help students cope with divorce and step 18 | P a g e
  • 19. families, family substance abuse, and life skills training such as anger management, self-esteem, and conflict resolution. • Roscommon Middle School counselors work with the Department of Human Services to make decisions in the best interest of the child where neglect and abuse may be present. Counselors work with support services to help build and/or maintain the family unit. • Roscommon Middle School counselors also work with Roscommon County Probate Court when needed to serve the best interest of at-risk students. • High achieving eighth grade students are given the opportunity to participate in Kirtland Community College’s extensive fine arts programs. • Roscommon Middle School collaborates with Central Michigan University’s Science Education Department to sponsor “Star Lab”. This day and evening program is for students and their families to learn about the solar system. • Roscommon Middle School Title I program collaborates with an area business to sponsor math and reading Family Involvement Nights. • Coordination with COOR’s Gifted and Talented Program to sponsor an informational meeting for parents regarding their middle school student who is eligible to take the ACT in 8th grade. • Gerrish-Higgins School District collaborates with the local Federally Qualified Health Center, MidMichigan Health Services, to provide health care services to the area's students and their families. The major goal of the School Based Health Center is to provide comprehensive primary care services with an emphasis on prevention, health improvement, and health maintenance and disease management. By providing School Based Health Care Services, student access to appropriate health care is increased; school absenteeism is reduced; students are taught to be advocates for their personal health; and through the Medical Care Discount Program, services are provided to people who otherwise may not be able to afford them. 19 | P a g e
  • 20. Section 1118 (e) section 5/Standard III – Student Learning: Roscommon Middle School strives to provide information in a format and language that parents can understand. • Teachers provide individual student academic assessment data to students and parents at parent teacher conferences which are held in the fall and as needed. • Individualized Educational Program Team (IEPT) special education data is updated at IEPT meetings, and a copy of that information is given to parents of special education students. • Progress reports are provided school wide three times a year. Additional progress reports are issued more often per parent request. • Attendance is closely monitored at the building, and letters are sent home to families when students have been absent more than nine days. • Report cards are issued to parents three times a year. • Parents and the community may enroll in Roscommon Middle School’s email notices that provide the most up to date information regarding school related activities. • Students of the Month are honored in the local newspaper. • “The Middle Years: Working together for school success” is a user friendly newsletter with a variety of topics relevant to raising a middle school student. • Parents of incoming fifth graders are invited to attend a middle school orientation that introduces families to the middle school concept. Section 1118 (e) section 14/Standard IV - Volunteering: Opportunities for parental involvement include: • Roscommon Middle School allows parents to work with students in the educational experience as chaperones for fieldtrips, helping in the science labs, and team building activities. 20 | P a g e
  • 21. Section 1118 (f): • Roscommon Middle School is barrier free and has on-site staff resources to assist parents with any disabilities so they may actively be involved in their child’s education. 7. Preschool Transition Strategies Not applicable for Roscommon Middle School 8. Teacher Participation in Making Assessment Decisions Roscommon Middle School teachers have input into the decision making process regarding academic assessments. For example, teachers meet in Professional Learning Committees (PLC’s) and are given release time to meet once a month to discuss formal and non-formal grade level academic assessments. The information gathered at the PLC is used to modify and adjust curriculum based on student need. Teachers also analyze student achievement data such as; NWEA MAP scores, AIMS/Web oral reading fluency results, MAZE comprehension data, and MEAP results. Teachers use this information to modify and adjust classroom instruction as needed to reach all learners. Teachers were given professional development time to learn how to analyze and evaluate NWEA MAP scores. They were trained to use the extensive NWEA database to gain access to the dynamic reports suite and growth charts for students in reading, math, and language arts. 9. Timely and Additional Assistance to Students Having Difficulty Mastering Standards Roscommon Middle School has a process in place that ensures proper placement of students experiencing math and reading difficulties within available programs. The selection process begins in the spring to prepare students and staff for the following school year. All students are assessed in late April using NWEA MAP tests (math, reading, and language usage) and AIMS/Web and MAZE for oral reading fluency and reading comprehension. This information 21 | P a g e
  • 22. along with current MEAP data and classroom grades are used to place students in appropriate learning environments for the following school year. These learning environments include admission into the Title I program and appropriate homeroom placement for students requiring additional support in certain content areas. For example, if a student requires extra support in math they will be placed in a Highly Qualified math teacher’s homeroom. All students at the beginning of the school year are again assessed to obtain baseline data using NWEA MAP tests (math, reading, and language usage) and AIMS/Web and MAZE for oral reading fluency and reading comprehension. New students to Roscommon Middle School are evaluated at this time to ensure appropriate placement within available programs. Students who were placed in the Title I program are re-evaluated every four weeks for evidence of progress in the areas of math and reading. Students who are benchmarking are released from the Title I program, but are closely monitored for success in the general education classroom. Students may re-enter the Title I program as needed based on progress monitoring data and teacher recommendation. Roscommon Middle School students are tested mid-year using AIMS/Web and MAZE assessments to chart oral reading fluency and reading comprehension growth. The data is analyzed to determine additional Title I placements. This process is ongoing and provides timely assistance to students who are having difficulty performing at grade level expectations. Students who have been identified for Title I services are given additional support in the areas of math and reading strategy instruction in all content areas. Depending on grade level, students receive between two to five hours of additional academic support outside the content area classroom setting, and/or additional assistance in the classroom. Title I teachers work with classroom instructors to meet the needs of each individual learner. They discuss individual student needs and brainstorm ways to differentiate instruction. Within the Title I program, Title I teachers differentiate instruction by using content area materials and technology to meet individual needs of each student. 22 | P a g e
  • 23. 10.Coordination and Integration of Federal, State and Local Programs and Resources Federal, state and local services and programs are effectively coordinated through the district consolidated application process to support the schoolwide plan. In fact, Gerrish- Higgins is involved in a number of grants that the Business Manager, Shay Anderson; Superintendent and Director of 31a, Dr. Millie Park Mellgren; and Title I Director, Kathy Rees, have written through the consolidated application process. They have worked to coordinate the following grants. (See Title I Attachment 1) • Title I, Part A/D • Title II, Part A • Title II, Part D • Title V • 31a State At-Risk Kathy Rees is responsible for the Title I grants. Dr. Park Mellgren, Superintendent, coordinates services for students formally identified to receive at-risk services. Mrs. Anderson coordinates Title II, Parts A & D and Title V. Mrs. Anderson, Dr. Park Mellgren, and Mrs. Rees have coordinated their efforts to efficiently supply materials, professional development activities, teacher stipends, release time and other support to the entire school district. The district professional development request form has been very helpful to coordinate those types of opportunities. On the forms, staff members are first and foremost requested to identify the connection of the professional development activity to NCA/School Improvement Goals. They are also required to obtain the approval of the project director if funding from one of the above grants is required. Mrs. Anderson, Dr. Park Mellgren, and Mrs. Rees adjust the source of the funding, with the purpose of coordinating all of the grants. For example, staff members who request to attend professional development activities need to complete a plan of how they intend to share and use the information themselves, upon their return. The goal is to make meaningful choices for professional development, which reflects a comprehensive, coordinated approach for educational reform. At the intermediate level, Mrs. McNitt, Roscommon Elementary Principal is a member of the COOR Intermediate Coordinating Committee for Professional Development (CCCPD). The CCCPD have coordinated grant efforts and have offered extensive training sessions that are ongoing throughout the year. At the community level, the Title programs coordinate services with several different agencies within the Gerrish-Higgins community to provide services and resources to our students. Action plans are written for some of the programs that outline what services or resources are needed. A record is kept that identifies program goals, technology needs, and 23 | P a g e
  • 24. agencies providing the service, target dates and a summary reflection. Some of the agencies that Roscommon Middle School (RMS) utilizes are: COOR ISD serves as a hub for most of the state and federal educational programs and support services for Roscommon Middle School. Their support covers three main areas of education, general education, special education and vocational education. Roscommon County United Way reviews RMS scholarship applications twice per school year. The money the school receives from the United Way pays for transportation tokens for the Roscommon Mini Bus System. Some of the programs are held during after school hours or during summer time. Free transportation is provided to economically disadvantaged students who attend these programs. Roscommon Mini Bus System offers RMS students a reduced rate for transportation as long as rides are booked in advanced. Michigan State Police, Roscommon County Sherriff’s Department, and the Gerrish Township Police Department all offer support and programs for RMS students and their families. For example, bike, snowmobile, boater, hunter, and internet safety courses, Walk to School Day support, bullying, drug and alcohol education, and current updates on gang issues all aimed at protecting and educating RMS students, families, and staff. School Based Medical Clinic is located within the middle school. Students have access to medical clinic throughout the day. The clinic provides help for students on medical issues, sports physicals, counseling, and provides current health information for students and their families and the staff. The location of the clinic has helped to keep students in school. Sometimes living in a small rural northern Michigan community will offer limited resources; that cannot be said that of the Gerrish-Higgins school community. Several local businesses continue to support Roscommon Middle School in a variety of ways. Glen’s food market gives discounts, McDonalds and Subway supplies gift cards for educational incentives, Roscommon Movie theater donates movie passes, Fred’s Bowling gives bowling passes, Impact Office gives discounts on student and teaching supplies, BP gas station supplies paper, crayons, and note taking books for the economically disadvantaged. The generosity within the school community is wonderful. 11.Evaluation of Schoolwide Plan For a schoolwide plan to be effective it must be evaluated annually. The Title I Building Leadership Team and the Parent Advisory Committee at Roscommon Middle School meet annually in June to analyze state assessment data, MEAP, and other indicators of academic achievement to evaluate the schoolwide plan. During this process, in depth analysis of students not performing at grade level informs the team what areas of the plan are in need 24 | P a g e
  • 25. of revision. The schoolwide plan is then updated and in place by the beginning of the following school year. Appendix A NWEA School Overview 25 | P a g e
  • 26. School: ROSCOMMON MIDDLE SCHOOL Roster: Fall 2008 Growth Seasons: Fall 07 – Fall 08 Reading Student Count Student Count Grade for Growth % Growth for Season % Proficient % Median 5 104 49.0% 110 66.4% 37.3% 6 117 47.0% 128 70.3% 32.8% 7 115 38.3% 124 64.5% 37.1% 8 121 48.8% 130 73.8% 50.0% Mathematics Student Count Student Count Grade for Growth % Growth for Season % Proficient % Median 5 105 30.5% 111 67.6% 36.9% 6 117 64.1% 128 60.2% 40.6% 7 115 52.2% 124 62.9% 42.7% 26 | P a g e
  • 27. 8 121 33.9% 130 63.8% 50.0% Appendix B1 Sub Group Analysis: Grade 5 Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Standards Reading Writing Total ELA Group Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 76% 76% 78% 39% 44% 43% 70% 67% 67% (economically disadvantaged) Ethnicity (Caucasian) 84% 80% 79% 52% 42% 47% 77% 70% 65% Students with Disabilities 36% 20% 17% 4% 0% 25% 21% 7% 17% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 76% 79% 77% 45% 38% 41% 71% 64% 68% Female 90% 81% 84% 57% 46% 55% 82% 75% 65% Math Science Social Studies Group Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 70% 74% 73% 80% 76% 75% Ethnicity 77% 80% 73% 85% 79% 72% Students with Disabilities 25% 0% 42% 36% 19% 25% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 27 | P a g e
  • 28. Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 76% 82% 73% 86% 80% 73% Female 78% 77% 75% 82% 77% 73% (These charts look at data for full academic year students) Appendix B2 Sub Group Analysis: Grade 6 Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Reading Writing Total ELA Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 74% 91% 90% 81% 54% 67% 77% 76% 82% (economically disadvantaged) Ethnicity 78% 92% 90% 73% 63% 74% 80% 80% 83% Students with Disabilities 42% 13% 10% 38% 7% 19% 33% 7% 10% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 74% 87% 93% 62% 59% 67% 72% 79% 82% Female 80% 98% 87% 86% 65% 84% 84% 80% 86% Math Science Social Studies Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 85% 80% 74% 66% 83% 74% Ethnicity 83% 79% 82% 75% 84% 80% Students with Disabilities 24% 13% 19% 23% 27% 29% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 28 | P a g e
  • 29. Gender Male 80% 82% 81% 76% 87% 82% Female 86% 76% 81% 70% 84% 80% (These charts look at data for full academic year students) Appendix B3 Sub Group Analysis: Grade 7 Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Standards Reading Writing Total ELA Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 82% 90% 73% 79% 54% 65% 82% 83% 69% (economically disadvantaged) Ethnicity 83% 93% 78% 85% 62% 71% 86% 85% 76% Students with Disabilities 22% 19% 35% 28% 0% 18% 28% 6% 18% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 81% 92% 71% 73% 56% 59% 81% 85% 67% Female 87% 94% 86% 95% 71% 85% 93% 87% 88% Math Science Social Studies Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 80% 74% 54% Ethnicity 84% 80% 66% Students with Disabilities 22% 6% 12% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a 29 | P a g e
  • 30. Gender Male 85% 86% 68% Female 84% 74% 65% (These charts look at data for full academic year students) Appendix B4 Sub Group Analysis: Grade 8th Percent of Sub-group meeting State Proficiency Standards Reading Writing Total ELA Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 89% 75% 64% 67% 62% 56% 83% 72% 61% (economically disadvantaged) Ethnicity 89% 76% 76% 71% 63% 57% 87% 73% 68% Students with Disabilities 42% 32% 33% 5% 16% 13% 16% 21% 13% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 83% 74% 75% 65% 50% 48% 82% 65% 67% Female 94% 81% 76% 79% 78% 64% 92% 84% 68% Math Science Social Studies Group Year1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 Year 1 Year2 Year3 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 2007 2006 2005 Social Economic Status (SES) 77% 64% 68% 83% 77% 89% Ethnicity 85% 71% 70% 89% 81% 90% Students with Disabilities 16% 21% 25% 26% 42% 56% Limited English Proficient (LEP) n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Homeless n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Neglected & Delinquent n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Migrant n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Gender Male 88% 68% 78% 88% 82% 93% Female 82% 75% 61% 90% 81% 88% 30 | P a g e
  • 31. (These charts look at data for full academic year students) Appendix C1 Roscommon Middle School “Learning for all in a safe, positive environment” Title I Parental Involvement Mission Statement We, the staff of Roscommon Middle School, in partnership with parents and the community, believe all children can learn. We will provide a safe and positive environment that offers a variety of educational opportunities which will enable your child to obtain life skills and reach their potential as a lifelong learner and contributing citizen. To assist in the achievement of our educational goals, Roscommon Middle School has developed a Parent, Student and Teacher Compact. It is a declaration of intent by all parties involved to help each other achieve mutual educational and social objectives. Our Parent, Student, and Teacher Compact, while being clear and concise, details the shared responsibilities that each of us has in order to ensure academic success for our students. The staff of Roscommon Middle School knows that parents are the first educators of their children. We are committed to developing school programs and activities that involve and equip our students, parents and/or guardians with needed skills and resources to assist their children in attaining their highest potential. Since parents are so important to their children’s education, strategies to assist student learning will be available throughout the year. Parental input is always welcome to help improve programs offered at Roscommon Middle School. 31 | P a g e
  • 32. Appendix C2 Roscommon Middle School “Learning for all in a safe positive environment” Parent-Student-Teacher Compact PARENT/GUARDIAN AGREEMENT It is important to have my child reach his/her full academic potential. Therefore, I will encourage him/her by doing the following:  See that my child attends school regularly and is punctual.  Attend parent-teacher conferences and other school functions.  Model respect by going to the teacher first about any concerns, trying to keep lines of communication open, and understanding that there are two sides to every issue.  Show respect and support for my child, the staff, and the school.  Establish a time and a place for completion of homework and work with my child to get it handed in on the day it is due.  Maintain high expectations for my child. Parent Signature ______________________________________________________ STUDENT AGREEMENT It is important that I work to the best of my ability; therefore, I shall strive to do the following:  Always try to do my best in my work and my behavior.  Come to school each day prepared with my homework and supplies, ready to learn.  Do my classwork/homework every day and ask for help when I need it.  Show respect for myself, my school, and other people.  Give my parents/guardians all papers and information sent home with me from school.  Participate in classroom activities and work cooperatively with students and staff. Student Signature _____________________________________________________ TEACHER AGREEMENT It is important that students achieve, therefore, I shall strive to do the following:  Provide a positive and safe environment that promotes active learning.  Enforce the rules and policies of the school consistently and fairly.  Believe that each child can learn and give each student strategies to increase competence. 32 | P a g e
  • 33.  Utilize a wide range of teaching techniques to benefit the wide range of learning styles.  Demonstrate professional behavior and a positive attitude.  Maintain high expectations for myself and all my students.  Maintain open lines of effective communication with my students and their parents in order to support student learning. Teacher Signature ___________________________________________________________ 33 | P a g e