Quality of light

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Quality of light

  1. 1. Quality Of Light Katelynn Olney*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  2. 2. What Is It? Quality of light is basically, what hue of light is produced at certain times of day. For example, Foggy mornings produce a light quality similar to this. Afternoon light will be similar to this. (this is the most “natural” light) Dusk and twilight produce a light quality similar to this.*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  3. 3. Dawn, Twilight, and Morning Light Taking pictures at twilight is very beneficial if you’re going for an eerie feel. For example, if you want a darker image of a house, twilight will provide darkness, as well as a haunting bluish hue. Taking pictures at dawn will give you a brighter, orangey hue. It will most likely give you vibrant colors, darker darks, and lighter lights. Taking pictures in the morning will give you a darker, cooler feel than taking them exactly at sunrise. If you’re going for an eerie feel, morning is prime time to take pictures that include fog as one of their Main components. It’s generally referred to as “soft light”. From Kodak.com: “Soft light is very camera- friendly—smooth, diffuse, even, with few shadows to confuse your camera. Cloudy days and large shaded areas offer soft light with no harsh shadows or intense bright spots.”*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  4. 4. Examples*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  5. 5. Afternoon Light Taking pictures in the afternoon will give you more “natural light”. It’s when you’ll get the most light, and more dramatic differences in light and shadow. Generally, afternoon light is what you’d be working with most. It doesn’t necessarily add any “hue”, however it will make pictures much brighter. So, if you’re considering taking pictures of dark things, or cold things, consider taking a picture in the afternoon and just after sunset to compare. Most likely, the “just after sunset” shot will give the object a better subject quality. It’s generally referred to as “hard light”. From Kodak.com: “Hard light, like that found on a bright, sunny day, creates very bright and very dark areas in the same scene. Another example of hard light is when the cameras flash is the only light source, resulting in bright subjects against a very dark background. Use the dark shadows as design elements or soften them with fill flash if youre within range.”*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  6. 6. Examples*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  7. 7. My Examples Taken at 2:00 PM Taken at 4:00 PM Taken at 5:00 PM*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  8. 8. My Examples Taken at 2:00 PM Taken at 4:00 PM Taken at 5:00 PM*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  9. 9. My Examples Taken at 2:00 PM Taken at 4:00 PM Taken at 5:00 PM*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.
  10. 10. My Examples Taken at 2:00 PM Taken at 4:00 PM Taken at 5:00 PM*images not taken by me are from kodak.com’s photography tip section or retrieved from google.

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