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Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
Kentuckys National History Day 08 09
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Kentuckys National History Day 08 09

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An introductory powerpoint about Kentucky's National History Day program.

An introductory powerpoint about Kentucky's National History Day program.

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  • 1. Kentucky’s National History Day
  • 2. What is National History Day? <ul><li>NHD is a project-based education program that engages students in the process of discovery and interpretation of historical topics. It is like a science fair for history. </li></ul>
  • 3. Categories <ul><li>Exhibit </li></ul><ul><li>Documentary </li></ul><ul><li>Paper (individual only) </li></ul><ul><li>Performance </li></ul><ul><li>Web Site (group and individual combined) </li></ul>
  • 4. Who participates? <ul><li>Students in grades 6-12 (individual or group) </li></ul><ul><li>Compete in District, State, and National Contests </li></ul>
  • 5. Requirements <ul><li>Each category has rules associated with it. </li></ul><ul><li>All PROJECTS must have an annotated bibliography with separated secondary and primary sources. </li></ul><ul><li>All PROJECTS (except Paper) must have a Process Paper. </li></ul>
  • 6. Theme <ul><li>Theme is very general and changes from year to year. </li></ul><ul><li>This year’s theme is “The Individual in History.” Other themes have been “Taking a Stand in History” and “Triumph and Tragedy” </li></ul>
  • 7. Student Interview <ul><li>Students are interviewed at the contests. </li></ul><ul><li>Judges are usually history teachers, public historians, or librarians. </li></ul><ul><li>Judges ask students questions like: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why did you pick this topic? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How did you do your research? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why is your topic significant? </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Rubric --Students can improve their projects between contests.
  • 9. Academic Expectations and Core Content Standards met by NHD <ul><li>Middle School </li></ul><ul><li>2.20: Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-06-5.11, SS-07-5.1.1, and SS-08-5.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources) to describe and explain historical events and conditions and to analyze </li></ul><ul><li>the perspectives of different individuals and groups (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, age, economic status, religion, political group) in </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. history prior to Reconstruction. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-07-5.1.2 and SS-08-5.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will explain how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause-and-effect relationships and give examples of those </li></ul><ul><li>relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-8-HP-U-2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will understand that U.S. History can be analyzed by examining significant eras (Exploration as it relates to the settlement of America, </li></ul><ul><li>The Great Convergence, Colonization and Settlement, Revolution and the New Nation, Expansion and Reform, Civil War) to develop </li></ul><ul><li>chronological understanding and recognize cause-and-effect relationships and multiple causation. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-8-HP-S-1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will demonstrate an understanding of the interpretative nature of history using a variety of tools and resources (e.g., primary and </li></ul><ul><li>secondary sources, Internet, timelines, maps) </li></ul><ul><li>High School </li></ul><ul><li>2.20: Students understand, analyze, and interpret historical events, conditions, trends, and issues to develop historical perspective. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.1.1 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will use a variety of tools (e.g., primary and secondary sources, data, artifacts) to analyze perceptions and perspectives (e.g., gender, race, region, ethnic group, </li></ul><ul><li>nationality, age, economic status, religion, politics, geographic factors) of people and historical events in the modern world (1500 A.D. to present) and United States History </li></ul><ul><li>(Reconstruction to present). </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.1.2 </li></ul><ul><li>Students will analyze how history is a series of connected events shaped by multiple cause and effect relationships, tying past to present. </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.2.1 through SS-HS-5.2.7— History of the United States </li></ul><ul><li>SS-HS-5.3.1 through SS-HS-5.3.6—History of the World </li></ul>
  • 10. District Contests <ul><li>District 1, Murray State University, March 14 </li></ul><ul><li>District 2, Kentucky Wesleyan College, March 21 </li></ul><ul><li>District 3, University of Louisville, TBA </li></ul><ul><li>District 4, Western Kentucky University—not until 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>District 5, Eastern Kentucky University, March 21 </li></ul><ul><li>District 6, Georgetown College, February 28 </li></ul><ul><li>District 7, Morehead State University, March 7 </li></ul><ul><li>District 8, Southeast Community and Technical College, March 20 </li></ul>
  • 11.  
  • 12. State and National Contests <ul><li>State </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History, Frankfort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>April 18, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nationals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>College Park, Maryland </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>June 14-18, 2009 </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. History Day Project <ul><li>It is not a book report, students will have to think about their topics, ask questions, find answers, and develop their own conclusions. </li></ul><ul><li>Students must “do history,” instead of just read about in a textbook. Students discover topic, instead of being told about their topic. </li></ul>
  • 14. Selecting a Topic <ul><li>Students should choose a topic that… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>INTERESTS them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relates to the THEME </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has a NARROWED FOCUS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Topics can be… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local, State, U.S. History, or World History </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to pick topic at least 25 years old. </li></ul></ul>
  • 15. Doing Research <ul><li>Students need both primary and secondary sources. </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary sources are not created first-hand. </li></ul><ul><li>History Textbook </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedias </li></ul><ul><li>Books or articles written by scholars about a topic </li></ul><ul><li>Primary sources are materials directly related to a topic by time or participation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Letters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speeches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Diaries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Newspaper or magazine articles from the time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Oral History Interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manuscripts/Paper collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Songs and Hymns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Photographs and artifacts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Court Proceedings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government records, including census data </li></ul></ul>
  • 16. Where Should Students Do Research? <ul><ul><li>Libraries (school, public, and University) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Historical societies and/or museums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contact college professors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Archival Collections at organizations (i.e. corporations, YMCA, etc.) </li></ul></ul>
  • 17. Going Beyond the Book Report <ul><li>NHD projects do more than tell a story, they make a point about a topic. A thesis statement makes an argument about the historical impact of the person, event, pattern, or idea you are studying. Often, it answers historical questions. </li></ul><ul><li>Questions like: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Why is my topic significant? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Has my topic influenced anything else of historical importance? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What changed as a result of my topic? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What causes led up to my topic? </li></ul></ul>
  • 18. Benefits for Teachers <ul><li>Project-based teaching tool </li></ul><ul><li>Appeals to various learning styles </li></ul><ul><li>Can be incorporated into class (theme is always very general) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches history core content (primary sources, secondary sources, timelines, and artifacts are used to interpret history and historical perspective) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches literacy (research, reading, and writing) </li></ul><ul><li>Teaches students to analyze and think critically. </li></ul><ul><li>Helps teachers integrate the study of history with other disciplines, including writing and the arts. </li></ul>
  • 19. Benefits for Students <ul><li>Makes learning about history fun! </li></ul><ul><li>Shows students that history is alive and relevant to their lives. </li></ul><ul><li>Lets students be creative and not just learn about history through a textbook. It’s hands-on. </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn important life skills and research skills that will help them in high school and college </li></ul><ul><li>Engages all kinds of learners.  </li></ul><ul><li>Encourages students to use their community’s resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Gives incentives to do well: Special Prizes/Scholarships at all levels of competition. </li></ul><ul><li>Chances to improve their work and compete at three levels of competitions. </li></ul>

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