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Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit
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Younger Brothers Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit

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Younger Brothers presents: Informative Slideshow of Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit …

Younger Brothers presents: Informative Slideshow of Pests in Arizona: Identify Your Culprit

Use this helpful guide to assist you in identifying some of the traits of pests you will commonly see throughout Arizona.

www.youngerbrothers.com

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  • 1. Carpenter Ants• One of nature’s most aggressive wood destroyers• Carpenter ants do not actually consume wood• Sprays and powders are typically ineffective• Destroy the nest for reliable extermination
  • 2. Harvester Ants• Primarily farmers that gather food and seeds for colony construction• Fierce predators that vehemently bite and sting intruders• Destroy the nest for reliable extermination
  • 3. Bed Bugs• Feed on human blood when other prey is unavailable• Very small and adept at hiding• Victims of infestation may never actually see a bed bug• Call local pest control immediately if you suspect an infestation
  • 4. Africanized Honey Bee• Hybrid of African honey bees and the westernized honey bee• Tend to swarm and fly farther from the hive than other bees• Respond quickly and sting in large numbers• Nest in small cavities and sheltered areas
  • 5. European Honey Bee• Important not to panic if stung by a bee• Only two out of 1,000 people are allergic to bee stings• People who panic are usually experiencing a normal reaction• Let professionals deal with bee hives
  • 6. Bumble Bee• Different from honey bees in several ways• Live in small communities between 5-50 bees• Only females can sting and will sting multiple times• Very distinguishable large, fuzzy bodies and thick wings
  • 7. Carpenter Bee• Nest by tunneling into wood, making trees a common home• Like carpenter ants, they don’t consume any wood but commonly threaten a tree’s life by excavating the trees they inhabit• Males act aggressive in defense of the hive but only females actually possess stingers
  • 8. Cockroach• Roaches have been around for hundreds of millions of years• Common species are America, German, and Oriental Cockroaches• Only about 30 out of 4,000 known species act as pests• Cockroaches tend to be more active at night
  • 9. Bark Scorpion• There are 40-60 species of scorpions in Arizona• Known as one of the most dangerous scorpions in the world• Bark scorpions are fluorescent, glowing green under ultraviolet light• Smaller scorpions are typically more dangerous than large scorpions
  • 10. Striped Tail Scorpion• Found all throughout Arizona• Sting is venomous but not usually lethal• Dark triangle mark between the eyes• Brownish-tan stripes on its back differentiate it from Arizona Bark Scorpion
  • 11. Black Widow• Venom is 15x more poisonous than a rattlesnake• Especially dangerous to small children and the elderly• They are non-aggressive and will only bite in self-defense
  • 12. Arizona Crab Spider• Look similar to wolf spiders• One of the largest spiders in the Southwest• Can move quickly and rely on speed to catch food• Very efficient climber with ability to climb smooth walls vertically
  • 13. Arizona Brown Spider• Also known as the Brown Recluse or the Violin because of the violin-shaped marking on its back• Doesn’t bite often but is dangerous and very venomous• The violin-shaped marking becomes more defined with age• Males are smaller than females but have longer legs
  • 14. Tarantula• About 800 species around the world• Venomous but rarely bite humans• Some species are very mild, while others are aggressive• Tarantulas have retractable claws, similar to cats
  • 15. Drywood Termites• Commonly found in warm coastal and southern regions• In nature the drywood termite breaks down wood in the soil• They often infiltrate homes through the attic or foundation vents• Resilient insects that require no contact with soil to survive
  • 16. CALL THE LOCAL EXPERTS TODAY Younger Brothers Exterminating Pest Control Services General Manager - Jenifer Salcido 623-487-3147www.youngerbrothers.com

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