0
Marketing Your
Technology
Marty Kaszubowski
President, General Ideas
www.SlideShare.com/Kaszubowski
@MartyKasz
What you WON’T be getting today
A PhD in marketing theory and practice
“One-size-fits-all” solutions to sell your
techno...
What I WON’T be talking about
 Many of the usual “marketing and sales” topics are only
appropriate for mature companies
...
What you WILL be getting today
 A framework that will help you think about the kind of
marketing you should be doing
 St...
What I will be asking about …
1. What are your goals for your company?
What kind of company do you want to
create?

2. How...
The kind of company you create defines
your marketing approach!

1. Lifestyle business
2.Small business
3. Scalable startu...
Types of ventures:
1. Lifestyle Startups: Work to Live their Passion.
Examples: Professional Photographers, Healthclubs,
S...
Types of ventures:
4. Buyable Startups: Born to Flip:
Examples: Tumblr (acquired by Yahoo), Instagram
(acquired by Faceboo...
A challenging question …
What do you want your company to look like in five years?

In ten years?
Did you say …
 A small,...
We Love Engineers … But …
• “Everyone loves ‘cool ideas’ and new
technology.”
• “I need to go-it alone to assure quality
a...
How do we define “Maturity?”
 An objective assessment of the maturity of your
technology is the first step to an effectiv...
Technology Readiness Levels
1. Basic principles observed and reported.
2. Technology concept and/or application formulated...
Technology Readiness Levels
1. Basic principles observed and reported.
2. Technology concept and/or application formulated...
Maturity defines who your target customer is!
 TRL 1-3 is basic research and is generally “marketed” to government
agenci...
Market Paths
Basic Research
(TRL 1-3)

Technology
Demonstration
(TRL 4-7)
Product
Development
(TRL 8-9)
What is a “Good Outcome” for you?
Success in Basic Research means:
 You’ve found agencies, universities, or R&D-intensive...
What is a “Good Outcome” for you?
Success in Technology Demonstration means:
 You have formed partnerships or joint ventu...
What is a “Good Outcome” for you?
Success in Technology Application and Product
Development means:
 Sales, sales, and mor...
Two Questions
To what extent does your technology make other
technologies obsolete?
Example: The automobile made the horse...
Other Examples
Niche Innovations:
Solid state Flash Drives did not make Hard Drives obsolete
The people who sell Flash Dri...
The Transilience Map
Makes sales & marketing
channels obsolete
Niche
Flash Drives

Leaves older
technologies
viable

Archi...
Another Useful “Framework”
• Build trust
• Extend communication
New Product
• Extend feedback
or Service
mechanisms
• Iden...
Another Useful “Framework”
• Build trust
• Extend communication
New Product
• Extend feedback
WAIT FOR IT …
or Service
mec...
The 7 Ps of Technology Marketing
1. Potential – Once it’s mature, what sort of new and valuable
applications or improvemen...
The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity”
Basic Research

Technology
Demonstration

Product Development

Potential

Many possible
applicatio...
The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity”
Basic Research

Technology
Demonstration

Product Development

Potential

Many possible
applicatio...
The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity”
Basic Research

Technology
Demonstration

Product Development

Potential

Many possible
applicatio...
A few words about selling …

Are you an introverted entrepreneur?
Not all people love
selling all the time.
But as a start...
The Introvert Salesman …
1. Understand the sales process
• Understanding how salespeople work will help you
explore ways t...
The Introvert Salesman …
2. Don't Expect an Immediate 'Yes'
• Not everyone will fall in love with your product or service
...
The Introvert Salesman …
4. Start with the People You Know
• You'll feel more comfortable talking to friends and
acquainta...
The Introvert Salesman …
6. Spend Time Educating
• Few startups have a known product to sell …
• Your potential customer p...
The Introvert Salesman …
8. Be a Consultant, Not a Salesman
• A salesperson's job is to find problems and help solve
them
...
Knowing your Competition – Existing Markets
Competitor Competitor Competitor
#1
#2
#2
Feature #1

Feature #2




Feature...
Knowing your Competition – Category
Creators!
Market
Category
#8
Market
Category
#7
Market
Category
#6

Market
Category
#1...
An Example of a Category Creator!
Personal
Data
Assistant
SMS Text

Cell
Phone

Laptop
with WiFi

Facsimile
Machines

MP3
...
One last thing to
worry about ...
Premature scaling of
sales and marketing is
the leading cause in a
start-up.

Early sale...
Questions?
Upcoming SlideShare
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Updated: Marketing your Technology

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This is a slightly revised version, most recently presented in Kiev, November, 2013.

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Transcript of "Updated: Marketing your Technology"

  1. 1. Marketing Your Technology Marty Kaszubowski President, General Ideas www.SlideShare.com/Kaszubowski @MartyKasz
  2. 2. What you WON’T be getting today A PhD in marketing theory and practice “One-size-fits-all” solutions to sell your technology Advice on how to get someone to buy something they don’t want or need
  3. 3. What I WON’T be talking about  Many of the usual “marketing and sales” topics are only appropriate for mature companies  I won’t be talking about:  Pricing strategy, Distribution, Market Research, Demographics, Market Segmentation, Advertising, Branding, Brand management, Direct marketing, Publicity.
  4. 4. What you WILL be getting today  A framework that will help you think about the kind of marketing you should be doing  Strategies for deciding who your customers are and what you should be saying to them  Some potential “good outcomes” that you should be pursuing  Encouragement to take marketing seriously and learn more
  5. 5. What I will be asking about … 1. What are your goals for your company? What kind of company do you want to create? 2. How mature is your technology? 3. What kind of problem does your technology solve?
  6. 6. The kind of company you create defines your marketing approach! 1. Lifestyle business 2.Small business 3. Scalable startup 4.Buyable startup 5.Large company 6.Social entrepreneur Per Steve Blank, et al
  7. 7. Types of ventures: 1. Lifestyle Startups: Work to Live their Passion. Examples: Professional Photographers, Healthclubs, Surf Shops, Ski Instructors, Golf Pros, R&D Shops 2. Small Business Startups: Work to Feed the Family. Examples: Restaurants, Clothing stores, coffee shops, Cleaning Services, Contractors, Taxi Cabs, Consultants 3. Scalable Startups: Born to Be Big: Examples: Google, Facebook, Skype, Apple, Ford, Boeing, Мобильные Телесистемы, SoftServe, etc.
  8. 8. Types of ventures: 4. Buyable Startups: Born to Flip: Examples: Tumblr (acquired by Yahoo), Instagram (acquired by Facebook), Groupon (should have taken the offer from Google!), IP-driven licensing 5. Large Company Startups: Innovate or Evaporate: Examples: Boeing (satellites, rockets), Ford Motor Company (Ford credit), Apple Computer (iPod, iPhone, iPad), Hewlett Packard (printers), Research In Motion (?) 6. Social Startups: Driven to Make a Difference: Examples: Tom’s (shoes), Ethos (water), Husk Power Systems (electricity generation)
  9. 9. A challenging question … What do you want your company to look like in five years? In ten years? Did you say …  A small, well respected R&D team with consistent project funding and licensable patents?  A stable, medium-sized company that offers several related products or services?  A major manufacturing company that has products known throughout the world?  Something else?
  10. 10. We Love Engineers … But … • “Everyone loves ‘cool ideas’ and new technology.” • “I need to go-it alone to assure quality and elegance.” • “Marketing is fluff and selling is black magic.” • “We need to get functionality maximized before we focus on customers.” • “A good engineer hates unpredictability and risk.” • “We can’t worry about making money until we get it built.” • “Outside funding causes loss of control and undue pressure to deliver.” Per Krishna Uppuluri
  11. 11. How do we define “Maturity?”  An objective assessment of the maturity of your technology is the first step to an effective marketing plan!  “Technology Readiness Levels” (TRLs) are a simple way to define how mature a technology is.  US government agencies, large companies, universities, and investors use TRLs to help guide investment, product development, purchasing, and resource allocation decisions.
  12. 12. Technology Readiness Levels 1. Basic principles observed and reported. 2. Technology concept and/or application formulated. 3. Analytical and experimental critical function and/or characteristic proof of concept. 4. Component and/or breadboard validation in laboratory environment. 5. Component and/or breadboard validation in relevant environment. 6. System/subsystem model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment. 7. System prototype demonstration in an operational environment. 8. Actual system completed and qualified through test and demonstration. 9. Actual system proven through successful long-term operations.
  13. 13. Technology Readiness Levels 1. Basic principles observed and reported. 2. Technology concept and/or application formulated. 3. Analytical and experimental critical function and/or characteristic proof of concept. 4. Component and/or breadboard validation in laboratory environment. 5. Component and/or breadboard validation in relevant environment. 6. System/subsystem model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment. 7. System prototype demonstration in an operational environment. 8. Actual system completed and qualified through test and demonstration. 9. Actual system proven through successful long-term operations. Basic Research Technology Demonstration Product Development
  14. 14. Maturity defines who your target customer is!  TRL 1-3 is basic research and is generally “marketed” to government agencies, major companies, and philanthropic organizations that seek to advance the state of the art. Ex: Sponsored research, “Science for hire”  TRL 4-7 is technology demonstration and is “marketed” to earlyadopters and strategic partners seeking early market advantages. Ex: Licensing agreements, sales of patent portfolio, joint venturing, pilot projects  TRL 8-9 is technology application and product development and is marketed directly to end users. Ex: Product sales and marketing, full-scale manufacturing & support
  15. 15. Market Paths Basic Research (TRL 1-3) Technology Demonstration (TRL 4-7) Product Development (TRL 8-9)
  16. 16. What is a “Good Outcome” for you? Success in Basic Research means:  You’ve found agencies, universities, or R&D-intensive companies who will pay you to generate new concepts and validate their potential; and  You have become a recognized “thought leader” in your field.
  17. 17. What is a “Good Outcome” for you? Success in Technology Demonstration means:  You have formed partnerships or joint ventures with companies who will help test your technology and ultimately manufacture products or provide valuable services;  You have licensed your technology to a company that will pay you a royalty when they sell products or services; and/or  You have sold the rights to your patent(s)
  18. 18. What is a “Good Outcome” for you? Success in Technology Application and Product Development means:  Sales, sales, and more sales.
  19. 19. Two Questions To what extent does your technology make other technologies obsolete? Example: The automobile made the horse and buggy obsolete To what extent will your technology make current marketing & sales channels obsolete? Example: The people who sell automobiles are not the same people who sold horses and buggies
  20. 20. Other Examples Niche Innovations: Solid state Flash Drives did not make Hard Drives obsolete The people who sell Flash Drives do not sell Hard Drives Evolutionary Innovations: 1 TB hard drives did make 100GB hard drives obsolete The people who sold 1GB drives also sell 1TB drives Revolutionary Innovations: High Definition (digital) TV made analog TVs obsolete The people who sold analog TVs also sell digital TVs
  21. 21. The Transilience Map Makes sales & marketing channels obsolete Niche Flash Drives Leaves older technologies viable Architectural Automobiles MP3 Music Digital Cameras High Capacity Hard Drives Evolutionary High Def.TV Revolutionary Retains existing sales & marketing channels Makes older technologies obsolete
  22. 22. Another Useful “Framework” • Build trust • Extend communication New Product • Extend feedback or Service mechanisms • Identify new “Insider Champion(s)” • Maintain relationships • Earn trust Current Product or • Maintain Quality Control Service Current Customer • Strong market research • MVP + early customer feedback • Find early-adopters • Focus on branding, social networks • Identify common need • Aggressive branding • Extend direct sales • Reduce “Switching Costs” New Customer
  23. 23. Another Useful “Framework” • Build trust • Extend communication New Product • Extend feedback WAIT FOR IT … or Service mechanisms • Identify new “Insider Champion(s)” • Maintain relationships • Earn trust Current Product or • Maintain Quality Control Service Current Customer • Strong market research ? • MVP + early customer feedback • Find early-adopters • Focus on branding, social networks • Identify common need • Aggressive branding • Extend direct sales HERE NEXT! • Reduce “Switching Costs” New Customer
  24. 24. The 7 Ps of Technology Marketing 1. Potential – Once it’s mature, what sort of new and valuable applications or improvements will be possible? 2. Products – What will you be delivering to your customers? 3. Price – How much money do you need to mature your technology versus what you might be able to charge for it? 4. Partners – Can you do this by yourself or do you need partners? 5. Promotion – How will you become known to your potential customers and partners? 6. Process - How can people obtain your product or service? 7. People – Who is the “face” of your business?
  25. 25. The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity” Basic Research Technology Demonstration Product Development Potential Many possible applications in many industries Initial product forms and features are being defined Specific products and services are defined, applications are known Products Papers, presentations, ideas Prototypes, one-time services, patents, methodologies Finished products, mature services Price Basic research funds Test and evaluation funds Operational and capital budgets Partners Other researchers Future manufacturers, joint sales & marketing Sales partners Promotion Conferences, technical Trade shows, professional Advertising, Public Relations, direct sales societies, journals societies, venture fairs Process Journals, invitations to speak, collaborative projects Test installations, Pilot Projects Purchase People The Researcher A team of developers, designers, testers The CEO and professional sales
  26. 26. The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity” Basic Research Technology Demonstration Product Development Potential Many possible applications in many industries Initial product forms and features are being defined Specific products and services are defined, applications are known Products Papers, presentations, ideas Prototypes, one-time services, patents, methodologies Finished products, mature services Price Basic research funds Test and evaluation funds Operational and capital budgets Partners Other researchers Future manufacturers, joint sales & marketing Sales partners Promotion Conferences, technical Trade shows, professional Advertising, Public Relations, direct sales societies, journals societies, venture fairs Process Journals, invitations to speak, collaborative projects Test installations, Pilot Projects Purchase People The Researcher A team of developers, designers, testers The CEO and professional sales
  27. 27. The 7 Ps vs. “Maturity” Basic Research Technology Demonstration Product Development Potential Many possible applications in many industries Initial product forms and features are being defined Specific products and services are defined, applications are known Products Papers, presentations, ideas Prototypes, one-time services, patents, methodologies Finished products, mature services Price Basic research funds Test and evaluation funds Operational and capital budgets Partners Other researchers Future manufacturers, joint sales & marketing Sales partners Promotion Conferences, technical Trade shows, professional Advertising, Public Relations, direct sales societies, journals societies, venture fairs Process Journals, invitations to speak, collaborative projects Test installations, Pilot Projects Purchase People The Researcher A team of developers, designers, testers The CEO and professional sales
  28. 28. A few words about selling … Are you an introverted entrepreneur? Not all people love selling all the time. But as a startup founder, that's usually part of the job description.
  29. 29. The Introvert Salesman … 1. Understand the sales process • Understanding how salespeople work will help you explore ways to offset your inability or dislike of sales • Try “selling” over lunch coffee. One-on-one or one-ontwo is always better than trying to "work a room.“ • Hire some to be your "relationship starter." • Work on building a community around your product or service (so they can sell each other and you don’t have to!). • Sometimes you just have to make the cold call.
  30. 30. The Introvert Salesman … 2. Don't Expect an Immediate 'Yes' • Not everyone will fall in love with your product or service • You will be pleasantly surprised by how many people say “Yes” once you stop expecting them to! 3. Fall in Love with Your Product • Deep down you fear that you don't bring value... • Focus on the ways your product or service saves your clients money, makes their lives easier, and changes the world for the better
  31. 31. The Introvert Salesman … 4. Start with the People You Know • You'll feel more comfortable talking to friends and acquaintances • They will be more forgiving as you learn how to best present your product/service. • Listen more than you talk 5. Ask a Lot of Questions • Don’t assume you know what potential customers value • Sales is really about getting to know your customers' needs. Ask them! • Find their “pain points” and customize your pitch and proposal just for them
  32. 32. The Introvert Salesman … 6. Spend Time Educating • Few startups have a known product to sell … • Your potential customer probably doesn’t understand what how you’re going to make his life better • Every sales call is a chance to educate people about your industry, your products, etc. 7. ”Small Talk” is a Big Deal … • Customers are people, too! • “Small Talk” = chatting about non-work-related things that are of interest to the person you’re meeting • Casual talk establishes rapport, builds relationships, and helps close deals!
  33. 33. The Introvert Salesman … 8. Be a Consultant, Not a Salesman • A salesperson's job is to find problems and help solve them • Selling is about creating value for both parties rather than simply providing a product or services 9. Find a Partner or Co-Founder Who Loves to Sell • Some people are just uncomfortable in a sales role and nothing helps … • If you really, really, really hate to sell, find a business partner who loves it. • The right person is worth whatever price you pay or equity you give up ...
  34. 34. Knowing your Competition – Existing Markets Competitor Competitor Competitor #1 #2 #2 Feature #1 Feature #2   Feature #3 Feature #4 Feature #5        Our Startup!!!     
  35. 35. Knowing your Competition – Category Creators! Market Category #8 Market Category #7 Market Category #6 Market Category #1 Our Startup !!! Market Category #5 Market Category #2 Market Category #3 Market Category #4
  36. 36. An Example of a Category Creator! Personal Data Assistant SMS Text Cell Phone Laptop with WiFi Facsimile Machines MP3 Players ? 1st Gen. Digital Cameras
  37. 37. One last thing to worry about ... Premature scaling of sales and marketing is the leading cause in a start-up. Early sales from board members or friends do not prove there’s sustainable business model. A start-up should scale sales and marketing only after the team has found a repeatable sales model.
  38. 38. Questions?
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