Hockey
Field Hockey Field hockey is played on gravel, natural grass, sand-based or  water-based artificial turf, with a small, h...
Rules and Play   The game is played between two teams of up to sixteen players, eleven of whom are permitted to    be on ...
Ice Hockey Ice hockey is played on a large flat area of ice, using a  three-inch-diameter (76.2 mm) vulcanized rubber dis...
Injury   Ice hockey is a full contact sport and carries a high risk of injury. Not only are the    players moving at arou...
Roller Hockey Roller Hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using  skates with wheels. The term "Roller Hocke...
Hockey
Hockey
Hockey
Hockey
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Hockey

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Hockey

  1. 1. Hockey
  2. 2. Field Hockey Field hockey is played on gravel, natural grass, sand-based or water-based artificial turf, with a small, hard ball. The game is popular among both males and females in many parts of the world, particularly in Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. In most countries, the game is played between single-sex sides, although they can be mixed- sex. Modern field hockey sticks are J-shaped and constructed of a composite of wood, glass fiber or carbon fiber (sometimes both) and have a curved hook at the playing end, a flat surface on the playing side and curved surface on the rear side. While current field hockey appeared in the mid-18th century in England, primarily in schools, it was not until the first half of the 19th century that it became firmly established. The first club was created in 1849 at Blackheath in south-east
  3. 3. Rules and Play The game is played between two teams of up to sixteen players, eleven of whom are permitted to be on the pitch at any one time. The remaining five players, the substitutes, may be substituted in any combination, from one to five, an unlimited number of times in the course of a game. Substitutions are permitted at any point in the game, apart from between the award and end of a penalty corner; the only exception to this rule is for injury or suspension of the defending goalkeeper. Players are permitted to play the ball with the flat of the face side and with the edges of the head and handle of the hockey stick with the exception that, for reasons of safety, the ball may not be struck hard with a forehand edge stroke, because of the difficulty of controlling the height and direction of the ball from that stroke. The flat side is always on the "natural" side for a right-handed person swinging the stick at the ball from right to left. Left-handed sticks are rare, but available; however they are pointless as the rules forbid their use in a game. To make a strike at the ball with a left to right swing the player must present the flat of the face of the stick to the ball by reversing the stick head, i.e. by turning the handle through approximately 180°(while a reverse edge hit would turn the stick head through approximately 90° from the position of an upright forehand stoke with the face of the stick head. Edge hitting of the ball underwent a two year experimental period, twice the usual length of an experimental trial and is still a matter of some controversy within the sport. Ric Charlesworth, the current Australian coach, has been a strong critic of the unrestricted use of the reverse edge hit. The hard forehand edge hit was banned after similar concerns were expressed about the ability of players to direct the ball accurately, but the reverse edge hit does appear to be more predictable and controllable than its counterpart. Other rules include; no foot to ball contact, obstructing other players, high back swing, and no third party. If a player is dribbling the ball and either loses control and kicks the ball or another player interferes that player is not permitted to gain control and continue dribbling. The rules do not allow the person who kicked the ball to gain advantage from the kick, so the ball will automatically be passed on to the opposing team. Players may not obstruct anothers chance of
  4. 4. Ice Hockey Ice hockey is played on a large flat area of ice, using a three-inch-diameter (76.2 mm) vulcanized rubber disc called a puck. This puck is often frozen before high-level games to decrease the amount of bouncing and friction on the ice. The game is contested between two teams of skaters. The game is played all over North America, Europe and in many other countries around the world to varying extent. It is the most popular sport in Canada, Finland, Latvia, the Czech Republic, and in Slovakia. Ice hockey sticks are long L-shaped sticks made of wood, graphite, or composites with a blade at the bottom that can lie flat on the playing surface when the stick is held upright and can curve either way, legally, as to help a left- or right- handed player gain an advantage.
  5. 5. Injury Ice hockey is a full contact sport and carries a high risk of injury. Not only are the players moving at around 20–30 miles an hour, quite a bit of the game revolves around the physical contact between the players. Skate blades, hockey sticks, shoulders, hips, and hockey pucks all contribute. The number of injuries is quite high and includes lacerations, concussions, contusions, ligament tears, broken bones, hyperextensions, and muscle strains. According to the Hughston Health Alert, "Lacerations to the head, scalp, and face are the most frequent types of injury [in hockey]." Even a shallow cut to the head results in a loss of a large amount of blood. Most concussions occur during player to player contact rather (49%)than when a player is checked into the boards (35%).Not only are lacerations common, “it is estimated that direct trauma accounts for 80% of all [hockey] injuries. Most of these injuries are caused by player contact, falls and contact with a puck, high stick and occasionally, a skate blade.” One of the causes of head injury is checking from behind. Due to the danger of delivering a check from behind, many leagues, including the NHL have made this a major and gross misconduct penalty. Another type of check that accounts for many of the player to player contact concussions is a check to the head. A check to the head can be defined as delivering a hit while the receiving players head is down and their waist is bent and the aggressor is targeting the receiving players head. Checks to head have accounted for nearly 50% of concussions that players in the National Hockey League have suffered. Concussions that players suffer may go unreported because there are no obvious physical signs if a player is not knocked
  6. 6. Roller Hockey Roller Hockey is a form of hockey played on a dry surface using skates with wheels. The term "Roller Hockey" is often used interchangeably to refer to two variant forms chiefly differentiated by the type of skate used. There is traditional "Roller Hockey," played with quad roller skates, and "Inline Hockey", played with inline skates. Combined, roller hockey is played in nearly 60 countries worldwide. There are two kinds of Roller Hockey; Inline and Quad. Inline roller hockey  Inline hockey is a variation of roller hockey very similar to ice hockey, from which it is derived. Inline hockey is played by two teams, consisting of four skaters and one goalie, on a dry rink divided into two halves by a center line, with one net at each end of the rink. The game is played in three 15-minute periods with a variation of the ice hockey off-side rule. Quad  Roller hockey (quad) is an overarching name for a roller sport that has existed since long before inline skates were invented. This sport has been played in sixty countries worldwide and thus has many names worldwide. The sport is also known as quad hockey, international style ball hockey, rink hockey, roll hockey,

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