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I planned the induction to last over six months. We started before school with a two day (mostly) intensive, then had an hour and a half session once a month until December.

I planned the induction to last over six months. We started before school with a two day (mostly) intensive, then had an hour and a half session once a month until December.

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  • I grew up in New Mexico, my parents were both in education TEFOL and Art. Family has now transplanted to Portland, OR which is where I spend most of my big holidays, visiting my niece. I taught for 5 years in NM in Santa Fe and Belen, my home town, in fact I taught 6th grad literature and science in one of my 6th grade classrooms. I discovered that I could teach overseas and never looked back. In 1997 I moved to Tanzania and worked at IST for 6 years, 5 of which were using using the PYP framework in a grade 5 classroom. I moved on to teach a combination 5/6 class, integrating technology at HKA in Hong Kong before moving into the PYP Coordinator’s position. Five years went by quickly but I grabbed the opportunity to work at AISD in Bangladesh as PYPC and IT Facilitator.\n
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  • in your new groups, debrief the activity by looking back on the answers that were collected. What does this information tell us about this group? How might this impact our learning on this workshop? What can we do about this?\n
  • What can we each do to ensure that this workshop is a success? These words represents one of the main headings for our essential agreements. Work on a word in pairs, think about the word and create one or two brief but descriptive sentences to offer the group as potential agreements.\n\nRelate this to classroom use.\n
  • Given some of the answers you gave to this activity plus your general feelings about the PYP at the moment (past readings, word of mouth, etc); a copy of this is sitting on your table, grab a copy and somehow identify which of these figures you feel best represents where you are at the moment. Put today’s date or color it, etc then look again at that sticker on your booklet and get together with the one other person in the room that has that exact same sticker. Discuss and share where you are at on the continuum.\n
  • Give yourselves permission to not know everything at once. Teachers typically like control and they like to know what’s going on. Throughout the induction process you’ll have some time to reflect and organize your thoughts. There’s a lot of information, it’s the journey that counts not just the destination.\n
  • Emily lives in London with her mom and dad, as well as a sister and brother. I knew her when she lived in Hong Kong, a student in my classroom. She is now 15 years old and will soon need to narrow down all the things she wants to do to just three subjects. Emily is thinking of Art, English Lit., and Sociology. She is already making plans to spend her gap year teaching English in China while she continues to improve her Mandarin in a local context. We’ll be learning more about Emily as we move through the induction program.\n
  • Think about a child, a student you know, your own child, niece or nephew, a former student or Emily and visualize what qualities that individual is going to need in order to take his or her place in the world. What qualities are going to help them succeed? Take a moment to think about this yourself; you can use p6 in your booklet to help if needed. Then share your ideas with your table group and create a visual representation of the ideal learner. Please choose someone from the group to share that with everyone.\n
  • These are attributes that an internationally minded person demonstrates. Notes the similarities between their ideal learners and the Learner Profile. \n\nFind a sticky and note it on page 4 in your MPYPH.\n\nTake a moment to reflect on the Learner Profile and yourself, which attributes are well developed? Which are challenging for you? What can you do to develop this further during the first year at a new school?\n\nTeachers at AISD are expected to actively display the Learner Profile in their classrooms. One of our Bangla teachers has spent some time translating the attributes into Bangla, as displayed here. These are available in Tagore, the school’s faculty server.\n
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  • These are attributes that an internationally minded person demonstrates. Note the similarities between their ideal learners and the Learner Profile. \n
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  • Teachers at AISD are expected to actively display the Learner Profile in their classrooms. These are available in Tagore, the school’s faculty server. \n\nIf you’d like a starter set printed for you, let me know.\n\n\n
  • Take a moment to brainstorm ways you can use or integrate learning about the Learner Profile into your classroom. Use one of the blank sheets in your booklet to record your ideas.\n
  • wander & wonder\nWhat’s what? So what? Here’s what!\nEssential Agreements\nAISD ‘tree’\n
  • Compare the mission statements for the IB and AISD. How does the Mission reflect the Learner Profile or vice versa?\n\nThe learner profile is the expression of the philosophy of the PYP and contributes to the development of international awareness.\n
  • Introduce the IB Standards and Practices document. A1 & 2\n\nThe PYP Standards & Practices describe a PYP school and provide focus for ongoing self-improvements in schools. It is the primary reference for school visits (pre-authorization, authorization, evaluation).\n
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  • Key features: Students will inquire, make connections, develop conceptual understanding, think critically, work collaboratively, consider multiple perspectives, construct meaning, reflect, take action \n\nRather than designing a fixed syllabus, the PYP has set out to identify transdisciplinary themes – areas of knowledge – which:\n\nhave significance for all students, all cultures\n\noffer students the opportunity to explore knowledge which is of genuine importance in understanding the human condition\n\naddress the fields which form the traditional disciplines but present these in a way which transcends these disciplines, therefore facilitating transdisciplinary planning and teaching\n\nwill be revisited throughout the student’s years of schooling, the end result being an articulated curriculum content, from pre-kindergarten to secondary school\n
  • The PYP definition of curriculum comprises three interrelated componenets and can be expressed in the form of three open-ended questions. \n\nThe figure represents this model. The double headed arrows indicate that developing, implementing and assessing the school’s curriculum is an iterative process, whereby each component informs the other two. This is not a linear model that ends with assessment. \n
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  • Go through the ES Binder: Assessment section - look at the assessment calendar; review a report card, etc\n
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  • wander & wonder\nWhat’s what? So what? Here’s what!\nEssential Agreements\nAISD ‘tree’\n
  • What were some things that could be particularly helpful?\n Keep the people in your home group in mind, looking for things that might be helpful\n Note any questions that arise, where can I find planners? etc if there are pressing questions\n Bookmark or record the url of pages that are particularly helpful, identify ways to return to places you found useful (to show others)\n
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  • Reflection – Take a moment to think of something that you feel you understand really well. It might be something that you can explain to others or something you have applied to solve a range of problems.\nWrite down or draw as much as you can about the learning experiences that you had, which contributed to this understanding.\n\n
  • Reflection – Take a moment to think of something that you feel you understand really well. It might be something that you can explain to others or something you have applied to solve a range of problems.\nWrite down or draw as much as you can about the learning experiences that you had, which contributed to this understanding.\n\n\n
  • Give time for participants to work.\n\nShare your experience with your table group and together identify any commonalities in your experiences then.\n\nAsk participants to share these commonalities and chart them while they share.\n
  • Reflect on ideas/learning’s from Chapter 1 “Unpacking inquiry”\n
  • Write down one thing you heard from one of your partners that you want to remember about the article.\n
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  • Mother Teresa - Indian nun, founded Missionaries of Charity in Calcutta, internationally known as a humanitarian and advocate for the poor and helpless, 1979 Nobel Peace Prize winner\nMohammed Yunis - Bangladeshi banker and economist who developed the concepts of microcredit and microfinance, advocating loans for entrepreneurs too poor to qualify for traditional loans, Nobel Peace Prize winner 2006 \nBarack Obama - American politician, President of United States, Winner of the Nobel Peace Prize 2009\nLiu Xiaobo - Chinese writer, human rights activist and political prisoner/dissident, just won the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize\nPrincess Diana - English aristocrat, campaigned against the use of landmines due the injuries they end of causing to children in war torn countries\nKofi Annan - Ghanaian diplomat who served as secretary general of the UN, 2001 Nobel Peace Prize, founded the Global AIDS and Health Fund to support developing countries in their struggle to care for their people\nPope Benedict XVI - Italian, Head of the Catholic church, founder and patron of the Ratzinger Foundation, a charitable organisation, which makes money from the sale of his books and essays in order to fund scholarships and bursaries for students across the world\nAngelina Jolie - American actress known for promoting humanitarian causes, and is noted for her work with refugees as a Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees\nSacha Baron Cohen-English comedian/actor best known as an agent provocateur in his portrayal of unorthodox characters.\nOsama bin Laden-Saudi Islamist extremist and founder of al-Qaeda.\n
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  • These are attributes that an internationally minded person demonstrates. Notes the similarities between their ideal learners and the Learner Profile. \n\nFind a sticky and note it on page 4 in your MPYPH.\n\nTake a moment to reflect on the Learner Profile and yourself, which attributes are well developed? Which are challenging for you? What can you do to develop this further during the first year at a new school?\n\nTeachers at AISD are expected to actively display the Learner Profile in their classrooms. One of our Bangla teachers has spent some time translating the attributes into Bangla, as displayed here. These are available in Tagore, the school’s faculty server.\n
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  • Sticking with “just the facts” is intellectually shallow and it fails to engage higher-order thinking.\nMemorization=lower-level cognitive work\n\n
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  • To stimulate more sophisticate, complex thinking, we need to create a synergy between the simple and more complex processing centers in the brain. This synergy means that information will be processed on two cognitive levels (factual and conceptual)\n\n
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  • Students retain the factual info longer because the use of the lens requires them to process what they know at a deeper level. Further, because students are invited to bring their own thinking to the facts at hand, they are better able to make personal meaning. The invitation involves them emotionally and the motivation for learning increases.\n
  • Thinking reflectively (metacognitively), are you aware of how the lens invites you to bring your personal intellect to the study? Does the engagement of your personal intellect increase your motivation and interest in this study?\n
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  • The Futility of Trying to \n
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Transcript

  • 1. PYP INDUCTIONAmerican International School Dhaka August-December 2010
  • 2. ABOUT ME...
  • 3. INTRODUCTIONS AND GETTING TO KNOW ONE ANOTHER You need your Wander & Wonder grids + a writing implementRules of playWander around the room and ask a different participant one of the following questions:(be sure to write their names and replies in each box on the grid.) No one should be asked twice. What color do you feel like today and why? What are you passionate about? What makes you go quiet? Name someone you admire and tell why. What are you most proud of and why. What is your strongest method of learning (give some examples) What questions do you have about the PYP? Name something you long to do but haven’t quite managed to do yet. What has been a tough learning experience for you and why? What do you love about teaching?
  • 4. USE THE STICKER ON THE FRONT OF YOURBOOKLET TO REGROUP; MEET WITH THOSEOF THE SAME COLOR STICKERS. DISCUSS. What’s what? So what? Here’s What!
  • 5. ESSENTIAL AGREEMENTS Respect Reflection Responsibility Curiosity Cooperation Creativity
  • 6. WHERE ARE YOU?
  • 7. MEET EMILY
  • 8. THE IDEAL LEARNER
  • 9. THE LEARNER PROFILELook at the Learner Profilein your MPYPH p4
  • 10. SESSION 2 - IBPYP AND AISD CONT’D Be sure to grab a number tag and sit at that table
  • 11. TheLearnerProfile inaction at AISD
  • 12. ACTIVE LEARNER PROFILEBrainstorm ways you can think to use or integrate learning about the learner profile into your classroom. Share in your group.
  • 13. TEACHER’S TOOLBOX
  • 14. THE MISSION & VISION AISD IBHow is the learner profile reflected in these statements?
  • 15. IB Standards & Practices
  • 16. Programmes: What are IB Programmes?The three IB Programmes each contain four core elementsPage 6 © International Baccalaureate Organization 2007
  • 17. Definition: How is the PYP defined? The IB Primary Years Programme, for students aged 3 to 12 focuses on the development of the whole child as an inquirer, both in the classroom and in the world outside. It is a framework guided by six transdisciplinary themes of global significance, explored using knowledge and skills derived from six subjects areas, as well as transdisciplinary skills, with a powerful emphasis on inquiry- based learning. © International Baccalaureate Organization 2007
  • 18. Overview of the PYPPage 7 © International Baccalaureate Organization 2007
  • 19. Learners constructing meaning: How is the PYP curriculumdefined?Three interrelated components expressed in the form of three open-ended questions. Written curriculum Taught curriculum Assessed curriculumThis is a model whereby all threecomponents inform each other.Page 8 © International Baccalaureate Organization 2007
  • 20. WHAT IS CURRICULUM?PYP defines curriculum as ‘broad and inclusive’ – The Written Curriculum – commitment to continuous school improvement – The Taught Curriculum – equal emphasis to methodology – The Learned Curriculum – assesses the actual learning and reminds us of our original purpose The PYP definition of curriculum includes all three components
  • 21. THE WRITTEN CURRICULUM 5 Essential Elements Knowledge Concepts Skills Attitudes Action
  • 22. (HALF) JIGSAW 1-Knowledge - p11 2-Concepts - p15 3-Skills - p20 4-Attitudes - p24 5-Action - p25
  • 23. 10:00 am
  • 24. SESSION 3 - INQUIRY & ASSESSMENTPlease sit in grade level or single subject groups
  • 25. Assessment at AISD
  • 26. 1:00 pm
  • 27. SESSION 4 - COLLABORATIVE PLANNINGPlease regroup using the colored dots on your workshop booklets. (Red, Yellow, Blue)
  • 28. Who will I be working with? Collaborative planning at AISD
  • 29. ATLAS RUBICONOpen browser (Safari, Firefox, etc)Click on Rubicon link on toolbarLogin using your name (letter of last name trick); password is “culture”Follow the prompts to change your password; don’t forget this!Your Atlas main pageStart exploring in browse modeCan you find your units (inquiry, math, etc); can you find any attached/linkeddocuments?; try downloading one of them
  • 30. TEACHER’S TOOLBOX
  • 31. OCC JIGSAW 1-Forums 2-E-library & News 3-PYP Exhibition 4-Resources 5-Support areas
  • 32. ALL TEACHERS/ADULTSPromote – Internationalism ThroughModel – Learner Profile inquiryTeach – 5 essential elements Programme of Inquiry Stand Alone Inquiry The PYP Curriculum Matrix Mathematics 6 Trans-disciplinary units Languages of work based on: Performing Arts Science, Social Studies Visual Arts Personal and Social Physical Education Education Celebrations Local Topics Incidental
  • 33. SESSION 5 - IB’S ONLINE CURRICULUM CENTERPlease sit in your ‘expert’ group: Forums, E-library/News, Exhibition, Resources, Support Areas
  • 34. EXPERT GROUPSDiscuss your findings, what What do you want to shareyou learned about that with your home group?area. Decide how best to shareWhat were some things that information to yourthat could be helpful? home group.Keep the people in your How much timehome group in mind. do you need?
  • 35. SHARING WHAT WE LEARNEDReturn to your home groupTake turns round the table to share thearea you explored on the OCCTake notes on each section as yourgroup mates share what they learning;something you could refer back to.
  • 36. Now you should have some of the pieces to the puzzle of the OCC!
  • 37. SESSION 6 INQUIRY Sit anywhere you like...
  • 38. DonutDiscussion
  • 39. Article reflections
  • 40. The IBperspective on inquiryRead pp 28-30 and pp 41-43MPYPH for next session
  • 41. EnjEid Mubarak oy ho you lida r y!
  • 42. SESSION 7 INQUIRY Sit anywhere you like...
  • 43. MODELS OF INQUIRYDirect the inquiryHelp justify learning tasksBuild on experiencesMakes sense of learning to reach understandings
  • 44. TEACHING & LEARNING CYCLE Laying the groundworkBranching out Exploration Making connections
  • 45. KATH MURDOCH Tuning In(To gauge prior knowledge and immerse students in the inquiry) Finding Out (Collecting and gathering information) Sorting Out (To organize, represent and present collected data)
  • 46. KATH MURDOCH Going Further(Extend or broaden experiences and consider other perspectives; investigate areas of personal interest) Making Connections (Analyzing and linking to themselves and their world) Reflection(To reflect on understandings and the process of learning; To draw conclusions and make connections between ideas) Action (To apply or act on what has been learned.)
  • 47. Grade 3 Multiplication Facts Teacher Driven Inquiry•  Memorize each fact •  Body maths – rows in a•  Testing cinema which is best?•  Mad minutes 1x20, 20x1, 2x10, 10x2, 5x4 or 4x5? Is it the best•  Fact families – moving for a bus? towards inquiry but allow •  Arrays – visual / for discovery first. manipulatives•  Emphasis on the answer •  Finding connections rather than understanding between 3x5 and 5x3 •  Different strategies to find the answer
  • 48. Infants lesson on Floating and Sinking Teacher Driven Inquiry•  Emphasis on books to •  Free exploration of collect facts objects in water tray•  Complete worksheet •  Prediction with task •  Open ended•  Closed sentences classification and fill in missing •  Record findings and words decide on new inquiry
  • 49. Grade 5 Recycling Teacher Driven Inquiry•  Read about items that •  Sort objects they think can be recycled on page can be recycled 37 and complete •  Use 2-3 guiding comprehension questions to keep focus•  Complete worksheet on on field trip field trip to find numerous •  Collect all paper that is facts not put into recycled bin and analyse data
  • 50. Grade 1 Reading / Circle Teacher Driven Inquiry•  Read silently and answer a list •  After reading chapter think of a of factual questions e.g. who is question and pass to next group to Leena’s friend? answer •  Recount, relate and reflect•  Complete worksheet on the read chapter – comprehension •  After completion of book decide a way to present it to rest of class with superficial questions e.g role play, interview with author•  After complete of book •  Compare characters points of complete test view •  Choosing book from selection with similar theme e.g friendship
  • 51. 6 o’clock partners
  • 52. SESSION 8 -INTERNATIONAL MINDEDNESS
  • 53. INTERNATIONALLY MINDED? RANK FROM 1-10Mother Muhammad Barack Liu Xiaobo Princess DianaTeresa Yunus ObamaKofi Annan Angelina Sacha Baron Pope Benedict XVI Osama bin Laden Jolie Cohen
  • 54. BEYOND FOOD,FESTIVALS AND FLAGSHow internationally minded is AISD?How aware are our students locally?How aware are they globally?
  • 55. MEET THE WORLD
  • 56. MINIATURE EARTH
  • 57. THE LEARNER PROFILELook at the Learner Profilein your MPYPH p4
  • 58. ATTRIBUTES &ATTITUDES, OH MY! What are some ways you explicitly teach the learner profile/attitudes in your classroom?
  • 59. SESSION 9 - CONCEPTUALLY DRIVEN CURRICULUM
  • 60. HOW DO STUDENTS RETAIN,TRANSFER AND UNDERSTAND KNOWLEDGE?
  • 61. WHAT IS CURRICULUMPYP defines curriculum as ‘broad and inclusive’ – The Written Curriculum – commitment to continuous school improvement – The Taught Curriculum – Equal emphasis to methodology – The Learned Curriculum – assessing the actual learning and reminds us of its purpose The PYP definition of curriculum includes all three components
  • 62. THE WRITTEN CURRICULUM 5 Essential Elements Action Concepts Knowledge Skills Attitudes
  • 63. Traditional Curriculum... is Topic Based AMERICAN HISTORY: American Revolution, Westward Movement, the Constitution, our Government, the Civil War, the 60’s, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Colorado leaders, Native Americans…SCIENCE: Plants, snakes, fish, the human body, genes,volcanoes, the Earth, space travel, machines, water, mountains,streams…ENGLISH: Grammar, syntax, essays, Edgar Allan Poe, TheCay, Romeo and Juliet, Poetry, Fiction, Non-fiction, Skills…ART: Van Gogh, Picasso, drawing, crafts, art appreciation…
  • 64. Two Dimensional Curriculum Model-Topic-based Processes & Skills Factual Content
  • 65. Three Dimensional Curriculum Model-Concept-based Concepts & Principles lls Fa S ki ctu ses& a es lC oc Pr on ten t
  • 66. Key PointsTwo-dimensional vs. Three-dimensional
  • 67. Key Points Two-dimensionalCoverage-centered vs.Idea-centered Three-dimensional “inch deep, mile wide” -facts provide a foundation to understand conceptual, transferable ideas.
  • 68. Key Points Two-dimensionalCoverage-centered vs.Idea-centered Three-dimensional “inch deep, mile wide” -facts provide a foundation to understand conceptual, transferable ideas.Intellectually shallow Intellectual depth - lacks a conceptual focus -a “conceptual lens,” or focus, to create a factual/ requires mental processing on conceptual brain synergy the factual and conceptual levels-- producing intellectual depth in thinking and understanding.
  • 69. Key Points Two-dimensionalCoverage-centered vs.Idea-centered Three-dimensional “inch deep, mile wide” -facts provide a foundation to understand conceptual, transferable ideas.Intellectually shallow Intellectual depth - lacks a conceptual focus -a “conceptual lens,” or focus, to create a factual/ requires mental processing on conceptual brain synergy the factual and conceptual levels-- producing intellectual depth in thinking and understanding.Inability to transfer Concepts and Generalizations Transfer factual knowledge -allows the brain to make connections - facts do not transfer; and see patterns. locked in time, place, or situation.
  • 70. Key Points Two-dimensionalCoverage-centered vs.Idea-centered Three-dimensional “inch deep, mile wide” -facts provide a foundation to understand conceptual, transferable ideas.Intellectually shallow Intellectual depth - lacks a conceptual focus -a “conceptual lens,” or focus, to create a factual/ requires mental processing on conceptual brain synergy the factual and conceptual levels-- producing intellectual depth in thinking and understanding.Inability to transfer Concepts and Generalizations Transfer factual knowledge -allows the brain to make connections - facts do not transfer; and see patterns. locked in time, place, or situation.Fails to meet the intellectual Develops the intellect to handle a world demands of the 21st century of increasing complexity and accelerating change.
  • 71. Barry’s clipart.comThe Structureof Knowledge
  • 72. KNOWLEDGE Is it possible to identify a particular body of knowledge for international schools?The PYP recognizes that it would beinappropriate to attempt to define any narrow,fixed body of knowledge as essential contentwhich every student should know. Acceptingthis, the task has been approached from adifferent perspective.
  • 73. Rather than designing a fixed syllabus, the PYP has set out to identify transdisciplinary themes – areas of knowledge – which:• have significance for all students, all cultures• offer students the opportunity to explore knowledge which is of genuine importance in understanding the human condition• address the fields which form the traditional disciplines but present these in a way which transcends these disciplines, therefore facilitating transdisciplinary planning and teaching• will be revisited throughout the student’s years of schooling, the end result being an articulated curriculum content, from pre- kindergarten to secondary school
  • 74. The Structure of Knowledge Westward Movement Early American Early American settlers looked for settlers migrated new opportunities. west.
  • 75. The Structure of Knowledge • Migration • Opportunity Westward Movement Early American Early American settlers looked for settlers migrated new opportunities. west.
  • 76. The Structure of Knowledge • Migration • Opportunity • Needs • Freedom Westward Movement Early American Early American settlers looked for settlers migrated new opportunities. west.
  • 77. The Structure of Knowledge People migrate to meet a variety of needs. • Migration • Opportunity • Needs • Freedom Westward Movement Early American Early American settlers looked for settlers migrated new opportunities. west.
  • 78. The Structure of Knowledge People migrate to meet a variety of needs. Migration may lead to new opportunities or greater freedom. • Migration • Opportunity • Needs • Freedom Westward Movement Early American Early American settlers looked for settlers migrated new opportunities. west.
  • 79. The Structure of Knowledge The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 80. The Structure of Knowledge Scarcity Supply & Demand Economic Depression Leadership The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 81. The Structure of Knowledge •Economic depression in one country can significantly impact other nations. Scarcity Supply & Demand Economic Depression Leadership The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 82. The Structure of Knowledge •Economic depression in one country can significantly impact other nations. •In times of crisis, individual leaders can exert power and shape the course of events. Scarcity Supply & Demand Economic Depression Leadership The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 83. The Structure of Knowledge •Economic depression in one country can significantly impact other nations. •In times of crisis, individual leaders can exert power and shape the course of events. Scarcity Supply & Demand Economic Depression Leadership The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 84. The Structure of Knowledge •Economic depression in one country can significantly impact other nations. •In times of crisis, individual leaders can exert power and shape the course of events. Scarcity Supply & Demand Economic Depression Leadership The Great Depression At which levels does knowledge transfer?
  • 85. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct...
  • 86. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct...
  • 87. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct... • Timeless
  • 88. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct... • Timeless • Universal
  • 89. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct... • Timeless • Universal • Abstract
  • 90. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct... • Timeless • Universal • Abstract • Represented by 1 or 2 words
  • 91. ConceptA concept is an organizing idea; a mental construct... • Timeless • Universal • Abstract • Represented by 1 or 2 words • Examples share common attributes
  • 92. Theory Building Generalizations Expressions of the relationship Between two or more concepts Concepts Classified/ categorized groups of related facts FactsFrom: Focus on Truths about specific events, objects, people.Inquiry by JoniWilson and Lesley These are easily investigatedWing Jan
  • 93. Te g d in ac h an er’ rst sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s nt g de -classified/categorized groups of relatedStu facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 94. Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s nt g de -classified/categorized groups of relatedStu facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 95. Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s nt g de -classified/categorized groups of relatedStu facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 96. Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt g de -classified/categorized groups of relatedStu facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 97. Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt g de -classified/categorized groups of relatedStu facts Facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 98. Organizing Themes Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt g de -classified/categorized groups of related Stu facts Facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 99. Organizing Themes Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt gKey Concepts de -classified/categorized groups of related Stu facts Facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 100. Organizing Themes Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’ rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt gKey Concepts de -classified/categorized groups of related Stu factsKnowledge Facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 101. Organizing Themes Theory Te g Building d in ac h an er’Central Ideas rst Generalizations sp -expressions of de lan reflections between two Un or more concepts nin ’s Concepts nt gKey Concepts de -classified/categorized groups of related Stu factsKnowledge Facts -truths about specific events, objects, people These are easily investigated From - Focus on Inquiry - Jeni Wilson and Lesley Wing Jan
  • 102. To develop the intellect and increase motivation forlearning, curriculum and instruction must create a“synergy” between the lower (factual) and higher(conceptual) levels of thinking.
  • 103. The Conceptual Mind engages thePersonal Intellect
  • 104. It is the conceptual mind that…
  • 105. It is the conceptual mind that… creates connections to prior experience and finds relevance;
  • 106. It is the conceptual mind that… creates connections to prior experience and finds relevance; synergistically works with factual level knowledge to develop the intellect;
  • 107. It is the conceptual mind that… creates connections to prior experience and finds relevance; synergistically works with factual level knowledge to develop the intellect; creates deeper understanding at the factual and conceptual levels;
  • 108. It is the conceptual mind that… creates connections to prior experience and finds relevance; synergistically works with factual level knowledge to develop the intellect; creates deeper understanding at the factual and conceptual levels; recognizes the transferablity of knowledge.
  • 109. It is the conceptual mind that… creates connections to prior experience and finds relevance; synergistically works with factual level knowledge to develop the intellect; creates deeper understanding at the factual and conceptual levels; recognizes the transferablity of knowledge. creates the motivation for learning
  • 110. Coordinated, Multidisciplinary Topic Organizer: A Little Art A Little Math Use of The Language Human Body Processes A Little ScienceThe “Potpourri Unit”of facts & activities A Little Literature
  • 111. This cognitive processingrequires an integrating,“conceptual lens” such asInterdependence or System to sup the intellectual synergybetween the factual andconceptual levels of the mind.
  • 112. Integrated, Transdisciplinary Literature Conceptual Lens: System The Human Body (Science concepts) The Scarlet Ibis (J. Hurst) (limits of the human body)Health To the Top: Annapurna (Blum)Wellness (endurance, respiratory system)Nutrition Physical EducationEating Disorders The Body ControlWeight Management MovementSubstance Abuse Human Body CoordinationDiseases Musculatory System Fitness EnduranceScienceCirculatory System Math Art Calculations: heart rate, body mass, Draw a body:Respiratory System Statistics symmetry, line, shapeDigestive System, etc. Measurements: height, weight Human forms - artFunction & structure Ratios realism, abstract,Interdependence Charts; graphs cubist
  • 113. Open the envelope on your table and have a look at the questions inside. What do you notice about them? How could you categorize them?
  • 114. Factual Questions:Why was the holocaust a significant event in world history?What beliefs did Hitler hold that drove his actions?Why is Hitler’s persecution of the Jewish people consideredinhumane? Conceptual Questions:What examples of humanity can you cite from our world today?What acts of humanity can you cite from our present-day world?How are beliefs, values, and perspectives related to views ofhumanity and inhumanity? Provocative (Debate, or Essential) Question: Can one be inhumane and civilized at the same time?
  • 115. 1. Think of two specific topics you teach. 2. Choose potential lenses for each topic (you can use the list on the table)Do the lenses change the focus or add a dimension for thinking about the topic?Which lens do you find most engaging (or challenging) for your topic?
  • 116. When we teach to the levels of concepts and generalizations we are teaching for deepunderstanding and the transfer of knowledge.
  • 117. MEET EMILY
  • 118. READINGS P 11 OR 12
  • 119. Inquiry is like...