How to Support Mobile Learning Initiatives Without Increasing Your Operating BudgetJune 2011<br />
Introductions<br />Jeff KeyesTeam Lead, Product MarketingKaseya<br />Anthony JulianoCTO & General PartnerLandmark Ventures...
Agenda<br />	Agenda<br />Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Best Practices for Developing Mobile Support & Imple...
Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Mobile access is ubiquitous <br />Mobile learning initiatives are in demand <...
Mobile access is everywhere<br />There are now more than 4.6 billion mobile phones in the world1. More than half of the wo...
Mobile learning is a critical<br />future goal<br />Through mobile devices and instant access to the Internet, students no...
BUT academic organizations are not increasing operating budget…<br />Cumulatively, technology budgets have been stuck in n...
…and are confused on how to approach mobile initiatives<br />“The reality is that the use of mobiles continues to be restr...
The Mobile Impact<br />Increase in mobile devices<br />  +  Increase in support expectations<br />+  Increased support cos...
Cost<br />	What does it cost to support a mobile user?<br />(enterprise)<br />“The Cost To Support a Mobile  Enterprise Us...
Ticketing increases<br />Complexity of supported devices<br />Different models<br />Rapidly developing hardware<br />New c...
Training & staff demands increase (IT & Teachers)<br />Schools have overburdened, underfunded IT staff: 49% of school lead...
User expectations increase<br />Pen and paper never break down, but poor mobile service can be a measurable bottleneck to ...
Best Practices: Implementing a Mobile Strategy<br />Develop mobile policies<br />Baseline your environment<br />Choose too...
Develop mobile policies<br />Develop solutions to defray cost<br />Create a “bring your own” program<br />Create partnersh...
Baseline your environment<br />Educate your administrators<br />Ask for forgiveness not permission<br />Build the case for...
Choose your tools<br />Focus budgets on tools that allow you to manage mobile devices within your existing infrastructure ...
Track your assets<br /> Understand what you have<br />Create a high-level view of your infrastructure<br />Track and measu...
Automate actions<br />Leverage technology to eliminate low-level support<br />Let devices & machines heal themselves<br />...
Recap<br />Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Mobile access is ubiquitous <br />Mobile learning initiatives are ...
Kaseya <br />Mobile Device Management Demonstration<br />
Agenda<br />	About Kaseya<br /><ul><li>Enterprise IT systems management for everybody
Value Proposition
A single Kaseya user can proactively manage 1,000s of automated IT systems tasks in the same amount of time required by a ...
Key Facts
Founded 2000 & HQ in Switzerland
Privately held, no debt, no external capital requirements
33 offices worldwide in 20 countries with 450+ employees
10,000+ customers
5,000,000+ assets managed
Patented technology and FIPS 140-2 compliant</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br />	The Kaseya Solution – Automated ITSM<br />Comp...
Agenda<br />	Integrated Mobile Device Management – KMDM <br />Available in mid Q3 2011<br /><ul><li>Phone registration
HW & SW audits
Device tracking
Email provisioning
Backup & restore
Managing lost devices</li></ul>Announcing Kaseya Mobile Device Management (KMDM)<br />
Agenda<br />	Phone Registration<br />Registering a Device for Management<br />Multiple Methods for Registration<br />Admin...
	Phone Registration<br />
Agenda<br />	Hardware Audits<br />Manufacturer & Model<br />Device Information<br />Device ID<br />Data Roaming on or off<...
	Hardware Audits<br />
Agenda<br />	Software Audits<br />By Device<br />Which Applications are Deployed to Specific Devices?<br />Which Applicati...
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How to Support Mobile Learning Initiatives Without Increasing Your Operating Budget

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  • Will Javier be on this call?
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  • There are now more than 4.6 billion mobile phones in the world, according to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU)&apos;s February 2010 press release. This means that mobile has taken the place of FM radio as the most ubiquitous communications technology on the planet.The way we think of learning environments is changing. Traditionally, a learning environment has been a physical space, but the idea of what constitutes a learning environment is changing. The “spaces” where students learn are becoming more community-driven, interdisciplinary, and supported by technologies that engage virtual communication and collaboration. This changing concept of the learning environment has clear implications for school The story of mobiles is no longer about the devices themselves, but about the blurring of the boundary between the cellular networks and the Internet. Increasingly, and more so in the developing world, the Internet is accessed from mobile devices using a cellular network that extends significantly beyond even the electric grid. Mobiles represent an untapped resourcefor reaching students and for bridging the gap between the learning that happens in school and the learning that happens out in the world. - http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2010-Horizon-Report-K12.pdf
  • Key Advantages of Mobile Learning:1. Encourage “anywhere, anytime” learningMobile devices allow students to gather, access, and process information outside the classroom. They can encourage learning in a real-world context, and help bridge school, afterschool, and home environments.2. Reach underserved childrenBecause of their relatively low cost and accessibility in low-income communities, handheld devices can help advance digital equity, reaching and inspiring populations “at the edges” — children from economically disadvantaged communities and those from developing countries.3. Improve 21st-century social interactionsMobile technologies have the power to promote and foster collaboration and communication, which are deemed essential for 21st-century success.4. Fit with learning environmentsMobile devices can help overcome many of the challenges associated with larger technologies, as they fit more naturally within various learning environments.5. Enable a personalized learning experienceNot all children are alike; instruction should be adaptable to individual and diverse learners. There are significant opportunities for genuinely supporting differentiated, autonomous, andindividualized learning through mobile devices
  • Districts facing technology budget cuts have responded primarily by cutting back on equipment and supplies or postponing exploration of new hardware. They aren&apos;t likely to tap into reserves or engage in fundraising - with some key exceptions. Eight in 10 school leaders whose districts have experienced declining technology budgets (80 percent) cut back on equipment and supplies. More than six in 10 (63 percent) say budget cuts have made them less likely to explore laptop programs - a marker, we believe, for disinvestment in innovative technologies under budget strains. Students are different, but educational practice and the materials that support it are changing only slowly. Schools are still using materials developed to teach the students of decades ago, but today’s students are actually very different in the way they think and work. Schools need to adapt to current student needs and identify new learning models that are engaging to younger generations. Many education professionals feel that a shift to a more learner-centered model focused on the development of individual potential instead of the imposition of a body of knowledge would lead to deeper and more sustained learning across the curriculum. To support such a change, both teaching practice and the tools used in the classroom must adapt.Assessment has also not kept pace with new modes of working, and must change along with teaching methods, tools, and materials. - http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2010-Horizon-Report-K12.pdfThe second adoption horizon is set two to three years out, where we will begin to see widespread adoptions of two well-established technologies: game-based learning and mobiles. Both games and mobiles have clearly entered the mainstream of popular culture; both have been demonstrated as effective tools for learning in a number of schools already; and both are expected to see much broader use in pre-college education over the next two to three years. Mobiles make a repeat appearance this year. While the Advisory Board acknowledges their great potential for learning, the reality is that the use of mobiles continues to be restricted by policies that prevent many schools from taking advantage of them as tools for teaching and learning.
  • “A key challenge is the fundamental structure of the K-12 education establishment. As long as maintaining the basic elements of the existing system remains the focus of efforts to support education, there will be resistance to any profound change in practice. Learners have increasing opportunities to take their education into their own hands, and options like informal education, online education, and home-based learning are attracting students away from traditional educational settings. If the system is to remain relevant it must adapt, but major change comes hard in education…” - [1] 2010 Horizon Report: K-12 Edition, The New Media ConsortiumA number of critical challenges must be addressed to unleash the educational potential of mobile technologies. Five key challenges outlined in the report include:1. Negative aspects of mobile learningCognitive, social, and physical challenges must be surmounted when mobile devices are incorporated into children’s learning. Disadvantages include: the potential for distraction or unethical behavior; physical health concerns; and data privacy issues.2. Cultural norms and attitudesThough many experts believe that mobile devices have significant potential to transform children’s learning, parents and teachers apparently are not yet convinced. A 2008 study done by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center in collaboration withCommon Sense Media found that most teachers see cell phones as distractions and feel that they have no place in school.3. No mobile theory of learning Currently, no widely accepted learning theory for mobile technologies has been established, hampering the effective assessment, pedagogy, and design of new applications for learning.4. Differentiated access and technologyWide diversity among mobile technologies represents a challenge for teachers and learners who wish to accelerate academic outcomes as well as the producers who seek to facilitate such learning.5. Limiting physical attributesPoorly designed mobile technologies adversely affect usability and can distract children from learning goals. Physical aspects of mobile technologies that may prevent an optimal learning experience include: restricted text entry, small screen size, and limited battery lifehttp://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/upload_kits/pockets_of_potential_execsum_1_.pdf
  • The Mobile Impact – increase in mobile devices + increase in support expectations + increased support costs + frozen or reduced budgets + reduced staff = HUGE PROBLEMWork on this.
  • Drawing comparison between enterprise costs and projected educational costs.
  • • Build capacity: Digital teacher corps – Teachers cannot teach what they do not know, and most have not been trained to use new technologies in their classrooms or afterschool settings. It is not just a matter of showing teachers how to use the devices; rather, it is crucial to provide them with methodologies for ways in which they can incorporate technologies within their curriculum. Professional development is essential to the future of mobile learning. http://www.joanganzcooneycenter.org/upload_kits/pockets_of_potential_execsum_1_.pdf
  • Because mobile devices are essentially always ‘on’ user expectations for quality of service increase. Poor service becomes a measureable bottleneck to learning. Unlike the ease of simply using pen and paper (essentially unbreakable), a broken mobile device brings learning to a standstill
  • Align best practices to problem areas.Recap of problem areas:Industry-specific – education budgets are tight and innovative projects meet cultural resistanceMobile-specific – mobile deployment means higher costs, more tickets, increased staff demand and higher user expectations
  • % parents who would buy for a student if they had learning initiativesBetter learning now = better learning later. Allows for engagement with next classProblem area to address: Industry-specific – education budgets are tight and innovative projects meet cultural resistance
  • Problem area to address: Industry-specific – education budgets are tight and innovative projects meet cultural resistance
  • Design educational innovations to capitalize on unique affordances of mobile – It is entirely ineffective to take educational applications that have been developed for a big screen and simply shrink them down to be used on mobile devices. Developers need to discern what is special about mobile devices and design interventions that take advantage of those attributes. • Counter the disadvantages and limiting physical attributes of mobile devices – Mobile technologies have numerous disadvantages (e.g., can be distracting) and limiting physical attributes (e.g., difi cult text entry) that — if not taken into consideration — might detract from the learning experience. • Avoid constant defaults to the latest technology – In order to develop scalable models, it is important to emphasize features that will become ubiquitous. Relying on features that are more common on less-expensive phones will help ensure that mobile technologies can help close rather than amplify the digital divide.
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  • How to Support Mobile Learning Initiatives Without Increasing Your Operating Budget

    1. 1. How to Support Mobile Learning Initiatives Without Increasing Your Operating BudgetJune 2011<br />
    2. 2. Introductions<br />Jeff KeyesTeam Lead, Product MarketingKaseya<br />Anthony JulianoCTO & General PartnerLandmark Ventures<br />
    3. 3. Agenda<br /> Agenda<br />Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Best Practices for Developing Mobile Support & Implementing a Mobile Strategy<br />Kaseya Mobile Device Management (KMDM) Demonstration<br />
    4. 4. Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Mobile access is ubiquitous <br />Mobile learning initiatives are in demand <br />Budgets are tight<br />Implementation meets resistance<br />
    5. 5. Mobile access is everywhere<br />There are now more than 4.6 billion mobile phones in the world1. More than half of the world’s population now owns a cell phone and children under 12 constitute one of the fastest growing segments of mobile technology users in the U.S.2<br /> Student Access to Mobile Devices3<br />[1] International Telecommunication Union February 2010 Press Release<br />[2] Pockets of Potential - Using Mobile Technologies to Promote Children’s Learning, Carly Shuler, The Joan Ganz Cooney Center at Sesame Workshop, 2009<br />[3] Learning in the 21st Century: Taking it Mobile! Blackboard K-12 & Speak Up 2010 Report<br />
    6. 6. Mobile learning is a critical<br />future goal<br />Through mobile devices and instant access to the Internet, students now see the world as their classroom and they have clearly stated that using their own mobile devices anytime or anywhere to learn will help them improve their personal productivity and learning.1<br />1. Encourage “anywhere, anytime” learning<br />2. Reach underserved children<br />3. Improve 21st-century social interactions<br />4. Fit with learning environments<br />5. Enable a personalized learning experience<br />[1] Pockets of Potential - Using Mobile Technologies to Promote Children’s Learning<br />[2] Learning in the 21st Century: Taking it Mobile! <br />
    7. 7. BUT academic organizations are not increasing operating budget…<br />Cumulatively, technology budgets have been stuck in neutral for the last three years, with school leaders in more than six in 10 districts (62 percent) reporting that their technology budgets have remained unchanged or decreased.1<br />[1] CoSNGrunwald Survey, http://www.cosn.org/tabid/4218/Default.aspx<br />
    8. 8. …and are confused on how to approach mobile initiatives<br />“The reality is that the use of mobiles continues to be restricted by policies that prevent many schools from taking advantage of them as tools for teaching and learning.” 1<br />[1] Learning in the 21st Century: Taking it Mobile! <br />
    9. 9. The Mobile Impact<br />Increase in mobile devices<br /> + Increase in support expectations<br />+ Increased support costs<br />- Frozen or reduced budgets<br />- Reduced staff<br />BIG PROBLEMS<br />
    10. 10. Cost<br /> What does it cost to support a mobile user?<br />(enterprise)<br />“The Cost To Support a Mobile Enterprise User,” Roy Maher, Business Insider, 2009.<br />http://www.businessinsider.com/the-cost-to-support-a-mobile-enterprise-user-2009-11<br />
    11. 11. Ticketing increases<br />Complexity of supported devices<br />Different models<br />Rapidly developing hardware<br />New challenges with mobile support<br />Inevitable ticketing increase<br />Number of supported devices<br />Additional machines for every student<br />Increased classroom demand<br />
    12. 12. Training & staff demands increase (IT & Teachers)<br />Schools have overburdened, underfunded IT staff: 49% of school leaders report cutting staff in response to declining technology budgets.2<br />“Professional development is essential to the future of mobile learning.” 1<br />[1] Pockets of Potential - Using Mobile Technologies to Promote Children’s Learning<br />[2] CoSN Grunwald Survey, 2004. <br />
    13. 13. User expectations increase<br />Pen and paper never break down, but poor mobile service can be a measurable bottleneck to learning<br />
    14. 14. Best Practices: Implementing a Mobile Strategy<br />Develop mobile policies<br />Baseline your environment<br />Choose tools<br />Track your assets<br />Automate actions <br />
    15. 15. Develop mobile policies<br />Develop solutions to defray cost<br />Create a “bring your own” program<br />Create partnerships to source devices from your community<br />Seek grants from vendors & government<br />Address security concerns<br />Plan to quickly remediate problems (fix it before it breaks)<br />Control machines in smart groups<br />Create plans to accommodate lost devices<br />Spare devices for loan<br />Equivalent support & experiences through other means<br />
    16. 16. Baseline your environment<br />Educate your administrators<br />Ask for forgiveness not permission<br />Build the case for stronger education & competitive advantage<br />As a 1st adopter, you’re a pioneer. As a follower, point to proven models<br />SMS messages have a 100% open rateamong young adults<br />~Nancy Lublin, speaking at the Social Innovation Summit 2011, based on research by DoSomething.org<br />Project budgets & create assurances<br />Look at existing costs while forecasting a strategic budget<br />Roll out 1 grade at a time, measure and predict – invest in metrics<br />Minimize support costs<br />
    17. 17. Choose your tools<br />Focus budgets on tools that allow you to manage mobile devices within your existing infrastructure and environment<br />Choose tools that enable your cost saving policies i.e. manage personal devices in a lightweight fashion<br />
    18. 18. Track your assets<br /> Understand what you have<br />Create a high-level view of your infrastructure<br />Track and measure device lifecycles<br />Intelligently insert new devices<br />Minimize onboarding processes<br />Increase types of supported devices<br />
    19. 19. Automate actions<br />Leverage technology to eliminate low-level support<br />Let devices & machines heal themselves<br />Be proactive when managing reactive support<br />Anticipate issues and plan ahead<br />Dedicate resources to more strategic initiatives <br />
    20. 20. Recap<br />Education Landscape & The Mobile Impact<br />Mobile access is ubiquitous <br />Mobile learning initiatives are in demand <br />Budgets are tight<br />Implementation meets resistance<br />Best Practices for Developing Mobile Support & Implementing a Mobile Strategy<br />Develop mobile policies<br />Baseline your environment<br />Choose tools<br />Track your assets<br />Automate actions <br />
    21. 21. Kaseya <br />Mobile Device Management Demonstration<br />
    22. 22. Agenda<br /> About Kaseya<br /><ul><li>Enterprise IT systems management for everybody
    23. 23. Value Proposition
    24. 24. A single Kaseya user can proactively manage 1,000s of automated IT systems tasks in the same amount of time required by a team of technicians using other techniques
    25. 25. Key Facts
    26. 26. Founded 2000 & HQ in Switzerland
    27. 27. Privately held, no debt, no external capital requirements
    28. 28. 33 offices worldwide in 20 countries with 450+ employees
    29. 29. 10,000+ customers
    30. 30. 5,000,000+ assets managed
    31. 31. Patented technology and FIPS 140-2 compliant</li></li></ul><li>Agenda<br /> The Kaseya Solution – Automated ITSM<br />Comprehensive<br />Automates all systems management tasks<br />Integration friendly<br />Scalable and flexible<br />Uncomplicated<br />Lightweight & only need 1 agent<br />Cross platform<br />Easy to install & use via a single web console<br />Affordable<br />On-premise or cloud<br />www.kaseya.com/solutions.aspx<br />
    32. 32. Agenda<br /> Integrated Mobile Device Management – KMDM <br />Available in mid Q3 2011<br /><ul><li>Phone registration
    33. 33. HW & SW audits
    34. 34. Device tracking
    35. 35. Email provisioning
    36. 36. Backup & restore
    37. 37. Managing lost devices</li></ul>Announcing Kaseya Mobile Device Management (KMDM)<br />
    38. 38. Agenda<br /> Phone Registration<br />Registering a Device for Management<br />Multiple Methods for Registration<br />Administrator Initiated<br />End User Initiated<br />
    39. 39. Phone Registration<br />
    40. 40. Agenda<br /> Hardware Audits<br />Manufacturer & Model<br />Device Information<br />Device ID<br />Data Roaming on or off<br />
    41. 41. Hardware Audits<br />
    42. 42. Agenda<br /> Software Audits<br />By Device<br />Which Applications are Deployed to Specific Devices?<br />Which Application Versions are installed?<br />
    43. 43. Software Audits<br />
    44. 44. Agenda<br /> Track Single Mobile Device<br />Where is a Device?<br />Recovery<br />Visibility on Location<br />Manage SLAs <br />Need to Dispatch Based on Device Location<br />
    45. 45. Track Single Mobile Device<br />
    46. 46. Agenda<br /> Locate Multiple Mobile Devices<br />Where are all of my Devices in a Given Group?<br />Informed Decision Making Based on Device Location<br />Which of my Devices is Closest to a Particular Location?<br />
    47. 47. Locate Multiple Mobile Devices<br />
    48. 48. Agenda<br /> Email Provisioning<br />Decrease End User Support<br />Save User Downtime<br />Initial Email Configuration<br />Create New<br />Reuse Configurations<br />
    49. 49. Email Provisioning<br />
    50. 50. Agenda<br /> Backup & Restore<br />Backup Contacts<br />Restore Contacts<br />Backup Status<br />Number of Backups<br />Last Backup<br />
    51. 51. Backup & Restore<br />
    52. 52. Agenda<br /> Managing Lost Devices<br />Mark Device as Lost/Missing<br />Set Alarm<br />Wipe Device<br />
    53. 53. Managing Lost Devices<br />
    54. 54. Agenda<br /> Next Steps<br />Explore Kaseya Mobile Device Management<br />http://www.kaseya.com/download/en-us/Files/Kaseya_Mobile_Device_Management_1_0_Release_Announcement.pdf<br />Learn More About Kaseya<br />www.kaseya.com/PPSresources<br />Contact Us<br />sales@kaseya.com or toll free +1 877-692-2003<br />Join the Kaseya Conversation<br />www.kaseya.com/community.aspx<br />
    55. 55. Thank you!<br />42<br />

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