Kaseya Connect 2011 - Building the Process Framework (Ant Farm)

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  • Good afternoon everyone and thank your for joining our webinar on “Building the Process Framework for Managed Services”. The great turnout that we are experiencing for these webinars is testimony to the importance of well defined processes for a successful Managed Services practice.
  • 3 objectives today:{BUILD} Give you a step by step approach to develop your processes, starting with a solid foundation of requirements{BUILD} Ensure that the service delivery model aligns with the expectations that you set with your customers for the service value proposition. If service delivery and expectations are not aligned, the result is unhappy customers{BUILD} (in just a few slides) Introduce a concept for deploying these processes in a modular approach that facilitates adoption
  • We hope you receive two benefits from the approach we are reviewing today:{BUILD} More sales – because your Managed Services represent greater value to your market{BUILD} Higher profitability – because you can deliver your managed services consistently, with less rework and reduced non-value-add effort
  • There’s a lot of buzz around about clouds these days.I would like to suggest that there’s one cloud that’s not getting as much publicity as it should.That’s the dust cloud raised by all of the backstage activities that many MSPs juggle in delivering their services to their customers.Unfortunately, without consistent processes in place, many MSPs are successful due solely to the heroic efforts of their staff.
  • In some cases, MSPs have developed processes for isolated areas. Areas like…While performance has improved in these areas, the cloud remains. There are still problems with waste, rework, and handoffs in other areas.
  • Unfortunately, heroic efforts don’t scale very well. You can maintain customer satisfaction for a limited number of customers, but at some point, as you add customers, your service levels begin to break down.
  • The underlying premise in this presentation is that services must be designed, just like products.Service delivery processes are a critical element of the design. You must design value – outcomes that satisfy specific customer needs – into the service in order to satisfy customers and achieve your business objectives for growth and profitability.
  • This afternoon, we’re going to look at the four steps required to institute a solid process foundation for Managed Services.At the end of today’s webinar we’ll review AntFarm’s offerings for a completed process framework for Managed Services.
  • All too often, “Value Proposition” for a service is confused with the top level messaging used to capture the prospect’s attention.[build]While this messaging is clearly an important part of the go-to-market strategy for a service, it doesn’t provide the necessary foundation for service design. It doesn’t explain the business problems you’re solving or how you’re going to solve them.
  • We’re going to take a three step approach to defining the in-depthvalue proposition for a service:a) Define the business problems you are going to address with a service – stated as business objectives. These will be sources of pain or benefit for the customer. They are the reason the customer will spend money with you.Increased revenue, reduced cost, reduced or managed risk, increase competitivenessb) Determine the underlying requirements – or needs- that must be addressed to solve the problemc) Identify the outcomes your service must provide to satisfy these requirements[build] Let’s start with a couple of examples for business objectives... As you write them, always finish with “so that you can…”
  • Now lest look at some examples of requirements that must be met so that the objectives are achieved.We’ll focus on the availability element in the first objectiveMake sure you include the non-technical requirements to be satisfied: No downtime because of changes that went wrong Client understands service delivery procedures Proper notifications Periodic review of service levels provided
  • Finally, determine the service outcomes you will delivery to satisfy the needsFor those of you familiar with Six Sigma, this thought process should look very similar to the Critical To Quality (or CTQ) Flowdown
  • Make this a comprehensive exercise.[build] The deeper that you understand the needs, the more value in the service.This is where you begin to differentiate your services competitively from those of your competition.(approx 140 needs addressed by 60 – 70 specific outcomes)
  • Once you’ve completed the Customer Needs Analysis, you can develop your top level messaging to match.You will be able to articulate:Specific business problems you are addressing – why they should spend money on you They underlying needs that contribute to solving these business problems The service outcomes you will provide that satisfy the needsYou will be able to establish credibility with your prospects that you understand the full scope of the business problems they face related to IT management and that you have and answer for those problems.
  • Typically 3 levels to a process framework as shown here…> Top level view> Process or workflow view>Detailed technical procedures (you probably have these already) process ties them together to create the serviceIn this presentation, we will be focusing on the top two layers in this framework.
  • Service Episodes – episodes of customer engagement
  • If the concept of an architecture or life cycle is still a little fuzzy for you…Common example of a life cycle for a project. All of you have one of these. You call it a methodology.For a project, relatively linear.Be sure to define entry and exit points or boundary conditions for each phase. Serve as: triggers, handoff points, contract milestones.
  • For managed services, the architecture has a number of parallel phases once you onboard the customer.This architectural model provides the broad framework for the life cycle of the relationship with the customer and for service delivery.(yours may not match exactly)
  • Next step is to define the process modules included in each phase.This is done by grouping the service outcomes into logical sets – based on common teams, tools, technology, place in the lifecycleNot as hard as it may seem. You know many of these already – perhaps just not all of the outcomes to include.Use affinity diagramming.
  • This is the AntFarm view of a Managed Service architecture.Yours may vary.Now you can explain your service methodology to both your employees and your clients.And, you know where in the process framework the various outcomes are delivered that satisfy customer needs > the value proposition has a direct tie to the service methodology and process framework.Although your diagram may not include all of these areas yet. As you mature your offering over time, they can be added.
  • Each module drills down to a process map, or Service Blueprint – discussed next.All of the modules connect together to form the service offering.Within the service architecture, you can prioritize where you want to start in process development or improvement.
  • This is the AntFarm view of a Managed Service architecture.Yours may vary.Now you can explain your service methodology to both your employees and your clients.And, you know where in the process framework the various outcomes are delivered that satisfy customer needs > the value proposition has a direct tie to the service methodology and process framework.Although your diagram may not include all of these areas yet. As you mature your offering over time, they can be added.
  • Process design begins with understanding the objectives and desired outcomes.
  • Kaizen is Japanese for “Change for the Better” or continuous, incremental process improvement. The Kaizen approach was developed as part of the Toyota Production System in the 1950’s and 1960’s. It spread to the United States in the 1970’s and 1980’s, where it has become established as the leading method for fast-paced business process improvement.The focus of Kaizen is incremental process change, as opposed to sweeping change, that improves customer satisfaction, eliminates wasted effort and reduces process delay.Some key tenets of Kaizen are shown here: First, understand value from the customer’s perspective: improve service delivery elements that represent business value for them and reduce or eliminate the rest Second, improve process performance by reducing service failures (whether for the customer or for the provider) and improving productivity Next, take an evolutionary approach rather than a revolutionary approach to process change. Institute an ongoing, repetitive process to improve service delivery that achieves results one step at a time. Finally, involve the workgroup as part of a team focused on achieving results. With everyone’s input, the situation is more thoroughly understood and solutions have stakeholder buy-in.
  • The foundation for Kaizen is the “Deming Improvement Cycle” introduced into Japan during the 1950’s by Dr. Edwards Deming, a renowned quality consultant. Since it’s initial introduction, the Deming Improvement Cycle has become the cornerstone of many process improvement disciplines.The cycle has four steps as shown on this slide – PLAN, DO, CHECK, and ACTLet’s review the steps:[build] PLAN: Seek to understand the current state of the process: how is value created for the customer of the process, how well is the process performing. Then determine how to improve the process: what steps must be optimized, what steps must be eliminated. Design the future state of the process. Prioritize the potential improvements. (You will not be able to implement all of them in a single Kaizen event)[build] DO: Implement the proposed process improvements: develop the tools, templates, standard work processes. Pilot the changes to make sure they are practical and don’t have unintended consequences. Roll the changes out to the work group.[build] CHECK: Determine the resulting process performance: is your team complying with the process; are metrics moving in the right direction. Verify that the improvements were as expected, or explain why not.[build] ACT: Fix the root cause of any variation from the expected results. Lock-in the new process to ensure sustained performance.This simple four-step cycle occurs at two levels for Kaizen events. We’ll explore this more in succeeding slides.
  • Kaseya Connect 2011 - Building the Process Framework (Ant Farm)

    1. 1. 1<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Building the Process Framework for your Managed Services<br />
    2. 2. 2<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />John KilianPresident, AntFarm, Inc.<br />
    3. 3. 3<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Our Mission<br />We are Service Architects<br />We drive service growth for IT Solutions Providers<br />through improved service design and delivery<br /><ul><li>Build in customer & solution provider value
    4. 4. Base service delivery on best practices
    5. 5. Employ practical methods and tools</li></li></ul><li>4<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Bold Statement #1<br />50% of Service Effort is Waste<br />CVA<br />Customer Value-Add<br />BNVA<br />Customers are willing to pay for this<br />Required to manage the business<br />WASTE!!!<br />Business Non- Value-Add<br />NVA<br />Non-Value-Add<br /><ul><li> Measurement
    6. 6. Accounting
    7. 7. Invoicing
    8. 8. Inefficiency
    9. 9. Rework
    10. 10. Setup
    11. 11. Travel</li></ul>Michael George, Lean Six Sigma for Service, 2003<br />
    12. 12. 5<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Bold Statement #2<br />Up to 98% of Elapsed Service Time<br />Adds No Value to the Client<br />Start of<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />End of<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />Service<br />Delivery<br />Value-<br />Add<br />WAIT<br />WAIT<br />WAIT<br />WAIT<br />WAIT<br />Non-<br />Value-<br />Add<br />Setup<br />Moving<br />Rework<br />Rework<br />Rework<br />Setup & Teardown<br />2% to 20%<br />Waiting<br />30% to 70%<br />Value-Add effort<br />2% to 20%<br />Rework<br />20% to 50%<br />Travel & Shipping<br />10% to 30%<br />Testing & Inspecting<br />5% to 15%<br />Adapted from: Dan Madison, Process Mapping, Process Improvement, and Process Management, Paton Press, 2005<br />
    13. 13. 6<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />At high utilization,<br />process delay increases dramatically with defects & rework<br />Bold Statement #3<br />For Each 10% In Your Variability<br />Your Clients Wait Up to 40% Longer<br />Queuing Delay<br />Resulting Delay<br />% Defects<br />System Utilization<br />(as percent of capacity)<br />More Work In Progress<br />
    14. 14. 7<br />Copyright © 2007 AntFarm, Inc.<br />Which archer would you want to train?<br />Improve process consistency first, then improve capability<br />
    15. 15. 8<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Our objective today:Introduce you to concepts to help you…<br />Take a structured approach to developing your Managed Services processes<br />Link the value proposition to service delivery<br />Institutionalize the processes so that you achieve the required results<br />
    16. 16. 9<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Two Sources of ROI from this approach:<br />REV<br />Improve sell price<br />Increase demand<br />OI<br />Manage capacity<br />Use less expensive resources<br />Reduce waste<br />TOP LINE:Increased sales of services through a stronger value proposition<br />BOTTOM LINE:Better return for your services capital $$ through more efficient operations<br />
    17. 17. 10<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Change<br />Management<br />Service<br />Call<br />Intake<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Anti-Virus<br />Management<br />Service<br />Ticket<br />Closeout<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Emergency<br />Dispatch<br />Service<br />Activation<br />Event<br />Management<br />Incident<br />Management<br />Quarterly<br />Business Review<br />Escalation<br />Management<br />Managed Services<br />Delivery Cloud<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />
    18. 18. Change<br />Management<br />Service<br />Call<br />Intake<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Anti-Virus<br />Management<br />Service<br />Ticket<br />Closeout<br />Emergency<br />Dispatch<br />Service<br />Activation<br />Event<br />Management<br />Incident<br />Management<br />Quarterly<br />Business Review<br />Escalation<br />Management<br />11<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />“Raisin Pudding”<br />Process Model<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />With apologies to J.J. Thomson's<br />'Raisin Pudding' model of atomic structure<br />
    19. 19. Challenges with little or no process<br />12<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Inconsistent service results > low client satisfaction<br />Variability in service delivery > high cost<br />Employee satisfaction issues<br />No foundation for growth<br />
    20. 20. 13<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Service Design is the keyto Service Value<br />“Better Service Design provides<br />the key to market success, and<br />more importantly, to growth”<br />Lynn Shostack, Harvard Business Review<br />Lynn Shostack, “Designing Services that Deliver”,<br />Harvard Business Review, Jan/Feb 1984<br />
    21. 21. 14<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    22. 22. 15<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    23. 23. Establish the Value Proposition<br />16<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />“Don’t Worry, Be Happy,<br />We’ve got you covered”<br />Doesn’t provide the proper foundation for Service Design<br />
    24. 24. Establish the Value Proposition<br />17<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Determine the Business Objectives for the service<br />“Improve the availability and performance of the client’s IT infrastructure, reducing the impact of IT problems”<br />“Align IT capabilities to the needs of the business, ensuring the greatest ROI on the client’s IT spending”<br />Outline the client needs to be satisfied<br />Specify the outcomes you will deliver to satisfy the needs<br />
    25. 25. “Improve the availability and performance of the client’s IT infrastructure, reducing the impact of IT problems”<br />Establish the Value Proposition<br />18<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Determine the Business Objectives for the service<br />availability<br />Resolve outages quickly, when they do occur<br />Outline the client needs to be satisfied<br />Keep the client’s IT systems in compliance with vendor software updates<br />Avoid unintended consequences from changes to IT systems<br />Specify the outcomes you will deliver to satisfy the needs<br />
    26. 26. Establish the Value Proposition<br />19<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Determine the Business Objectives for the service<br />“Improve the availability and performance of the client’s IT infrastructure, reducing the impact of IT problems”<br />availability<br />Resolve outages quickly, when they do occur<br />Outline the client needs to be satisfied<br />Service Desk to receive client service calls<br />Specify the outcomes you will deliver to satisfy the needs<br />Remote incident resolution to restore service<br />Emergency dispatch when on site presence is required<br />
    27. 27. Customer Needs Analysis<br />20<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Customer Needs<br />Service Results<br />Service Desk to receive client service calls<br />24 x 7 Monitoring and event management<br />Resolve outages quickly, when they do occur<br />Remote incident resolution to restore service<br />Emergency dispatch when on site presence is required<br />Patch review for applicability and risk<br />Server patch application and verification<br />Keep the client’s IT systems in compliance with vendor software updates<br />Desktop patch application and verification<br />Problem management process for patch issues<br />Avoid unintended consequences from changes to IT systems<br />Change management process<br />Central (or online) backup system<br />Ensure that the client’s data is backed up to enable recovery within required service levels<br />Compelling <br />Value Proposition originates here<br />!!!<br />Backup monitoring and alerting on backup issues<br />Backup issue resolution<br />5 x “What else?”<br />
    28. 28. Customer Needs Analysis<br />21<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Customer Needs<br />Service Results<br />Service Desk to receive client service calls<br />24 x 7 Monitoring and event management<br />Resolve outages quickly, when they do occur<br />Remote incident resolution to restore service<br />Emergency dispatch when on site presence is required<br />Patch review for applicability and risk<br />Server patch application and verification<br />Keep the client’s IT systems in compliance with vendor software updates<br />Desktop patch application and verification<br />Problem management process for patch issues<br />Avoid unintended consequences from changes to IT systems<br />Now, you have a foundation for Service Design!<br />Change management process<br />Central (or online) backup system<br />Ensure that the client’s data is backed up to enable recovery within required service levels<br />Backup monitoring and alerting on backup issues<br />Backup issue resolution<br />
    29. 29. And…<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Don’t Worry, Be Happy,<br />We’ve got you covered<br />“Improve the availability and performance of the client’s IT infrastructure, reducing the impact of IT problems”<br />Because we’re going to…<br />“Align IT capabilities to the needs of the business, ensuring the greatest ROI on the client’s IT spending”<br />Resolve outages quickly, when they do occur<br />By addressing these needs of yours…<br />Keep the client’s IT systems in compliance with vendor software updates<br />Ensure that the client’s data is backed up to enable recovery within required service levels<br />Remote incident resolution to restore service<br />With these service outcomes…<br />Emergency dispatch when on site presence is required<br />Patch review for applicability and risk<br />Server patch application and verification<br />Problem management process for patch issues<br />22<br />
    30. 30. 23<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    31. 31. Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Three Layers<br />of the <br />Process<br />Framework<br />Life Cycle Diagram<br />Service<br />Architecture<br />Process Maps<br />Service Blueprint<br />Module Overview Diagram<br />Procedure Descriptions<br />Job Aid<br />24<br />
    32. 32. 25<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Design the Service Architecture<br />The Service Life Cycle:<br />Block diagram depicting the service from start to finish<br />Provides a high level understanding of the service flow<br />Brings organization to the underlying process modules – it shows how they relate<br />
    33. 33. 26<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Typical Implementation Life Cycle<br />Commonly known as a “Methodology”<br />Time<br />Project<br />Initiation<br />System<br />Design<br />System<br />Build & Ship<br />System<br />Install & Test<br />Project<br />Closeout<br />Customer<br />Training<br />Define Entry and Exit conditions for each phase:<br /><ul><li> Service Triggers
    34. 34. Boundary Conditions</li></ul> for Blueprinting<br /><ul><li> Milestones for Project</li></ul> Management<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Project<br />Control<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />
    35. 35. 27<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Define your Managed Services Life Cycle<br />Time<br />Delivery<br />Management<br />Client<br />Onboarding<br />Reactive<br />Support<br />Proactive<br />Management<br />Strategic<br />Consulting<br />Contract<br />Renewal<br />Contract<br />Cancellation<br />Security<br />Management<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />Service Triggers<br />Entry<br />Exit<br />
    36. 36. 28<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Building Out the Service Architecture<br />Customer Needs<br />Analysis results<br />mapped here<br />Needs<br />Results<br />Reactive<br />Support<br />Proactive<br />Management<br />Delivery<br />Management<br />Service<br />Cancellation<br />Client<br />Onboarding<br />Service<br />Desk<br />Quarterly<br />Business<br />Review<br />Server &<br />Desktop<br />Management<br />Service<br />Deactivation<br />Service<br />Kickoff<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />Service<br />Activation<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Reporting<br />Patch review for applicability and risk<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Change<br />Management<br />Tier 1<br />Help Desk<br />Server patch application and verification<br />Agreement<br />Management<br />Remote incident resolution to restore service<br />Tier 2<br />Incident<br />Response<br />Network<br />Management<br />Use the Affinity<br />Diagram<br />
    37. 37. Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Responsive Support<br />Typical “Mature”<br />Managed Services Architecture<br />Service Ticket Management<br />Service Call<br />Intake<br />Event<br />Management<br />Response<br />Matrix<br />Service Ticket<br />Closeout<br />Escalation Management<br />Request Fulfillment and Incident Management<br />Client Onboarding<br />Service<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />Tier 1<br />Help Desk<br />Support<br />Tier 2<br />Incident<br />Resolution<br />Emergency Dispatch<br />Scheduled<br />Dispatch<br />Transition & Activation<br />Proactive Management<br />Transition<br />From Sales<br />Client<br />Service<br />Kickoff<br />Service<br />Activation<br />IT Systems Management<br />Problem<br />Management<br />Server & Desktop<br />Management<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Network<br />Management<br />Systems Readiness Audit<br />Security Management<br />Client IT<br />Environment Discovery<br />Baseline &<br />Analysis<br />Audit Results<br />Review<br />Firewall<br />Management<br />Malware<br />Management<br />Access<br />Management<br />Audits and Tests<br />IT Service<br />Continuity<br />Audit<br />Recovery Planning &<br />Testing<br />Proactive<br />Availability<br />Audit<br />Availability<br />Testing<br />Service<br />Level<br />Assurance<br />Technical Account Management<br />Quarterly<br />Business<br />Review<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Program<br />Customer<br />Satisfaction<br />Program<br />System Health<br />& Service Level<br />Reporting<br />Strategic IT Consulting<br />Business<br />Requirements<br />Discovery<br />Strategic<br />IT Plan<br />Development<br />StrategicIT Plan Review<br />& Management<br />Service Control<br />Service Cancellation<br />Asset &<br />Configuration<br />Management<br />Change<br />Management<br />Risk<br />Management<br />Agreement<br />Management<br />Queue<br />Management<br />Continual<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Service<br />Closeout<br />Service<br />Deactivation<br />29<br />
    38. 38. Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Typical “Mature”<br />Managed Services Architecture<br />Client Onboarding<br />Transition & Activation<br />Proactive Management<br />Client<br />Service<br />Kickoff<br />Transition<br />From Sales<br />Client<br />Service<br />Kickoff<br />Service<br />Activation<br />IT Systems Management<br />Problem<br />Management<br />Server & Desktop<br />Management<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Network<br />Management<br />Responsive Support<br />Systems Readiness Audit<br />Service Ticket Management<br />Security Management<br />Client IT<br />Environment Discovery<br />Baseline &<br />Analysis<br />Audit Results<br />Review<br />Service Call<br />Intake<br />Event<br />Management<br />Response<br />Matrix<br />Service Ticket<br />Closeout<br />Escalation Management<br />Firewall<br />Management<br />Malware<br />Management<br />Access<br />Management<br />Request Fulfillment and Incident Management<br />Audits and Tests<br />Service<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />Tier 1<br />Help Desk<br />Support<br />Tier 2<br />Incident<br />Resolution<br />Emergency Dispatch<br />Scheduled<br />Dispatch<br />IT Service<br />Continuity<br />Audit<br />Recovery Planning &<br />Testing<br />Proactive<br />Availability<br />Audit<br />Availability<br />Testing<br />Service<br />Level<br />Assurance<br />Technical Account Management<br />Quarterly<br />Business<br />Review<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Program<br />Negative Feedback<br />Review<br />System Health<br />& Service Level<br />Reporting<br />Strategic IT Consulting<br />Business<br />Requirements<br />Discovery<br />Strategic<br />IT Plan<br />Development<br />StrategicIT Plan Review<br />& Management<br />Service Control<br />Service Cancellation<br />Asset &<br />Configuration<br />Management<br />Change<br />Management<br />Risk<br />Management<br />Agreement<br />Management<br />Queue<br />Management<br />Continual<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Service<br />Closeout<br />Service<br />Deactivation<br />30<br />
    39. 39. Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />31<br />Responsive Support<br />PAIN<br />Priorities<br />Service Ticket Management<br />Service Call<br />Intake<br />Event<br />Management<br />Response<br />Matrix<br />Service Ticket<br />Closeout<br />Escalation Management<br />Request Fulfillment and Incident Management<br />Client Onboarding<br />Service<br />Request<br />Fulfillment<br />Tier 1<br />Help Desk<br />Support<br />Tier 2<br />Incident<br />Resolution<br />Emergency Dispatch<br />Scheduled<br />Dispatch<br />PAIN<br />Transition & Activation<br />Proactive Management<br />Transition<br />From Sales<br />Client<br />Service<br />Kickoff<br />Service<br />Activation<br />IT Systems Management<br />Problem<br />Management<br />Server & Desktop<br />Management<br />Patch<br />Management<br />Backup<br />Management<br />Network<br />Management<br />Systems Readiness Audit<br />Security Management<br />Client IT<br />Environment Discovery<br />Baseline &<br />Analysis<br />Audit Results<br />Review<br />Firewall<br />Management<br />Malware<br />Management<br />Access<br />Management<br />Audits and Tests<br />IT Service<br />Continuity<br />Audit<br />Recovery Planning &<br />Testing<br />Proactive<br />Availability<br />Audit<br />Availability<br />Testing<br />Service<br />Level<br />Assurance<br />Technical Account Management<br />Quarterly<br />Business<br />Review<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Program<br />Customer<br />Satisfaction<br />Program<br />System Health<br />& Service Level<br />Reporting<br />Strategic IT Consulting<br />VALUE<br />Business<br />Requirements<br />Discovery<br />Strategic<br />IT Plan<br />Development<br />StrategicIT Plan Review<br />& Management<br />Service Control<br />Service Cancellation<br />Asset &<br />Configuration<br />Management<br />Change<br />Management<br />Risk<br />Management<br />Agreement<br />Management<br />Queue<br />Management<br />Continual<br />Service<br />Improvement<br />Service<br />Closeout<br />Service<br />Deactivation<br />
    40. 40. 32<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    41. 41. 33<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />What’s a Service Blueprint?<br />Graphical projection of how a service is delivered from the CUSTOMER’S PERSPECTIVE<br />Expansion of the general service delivery concept, providing who, what, when, where, & how details<br />Charts all of the transactions that occur both in the customer’s view and outside of it<br />Foundation for the Statement of Work / Service Agreement and consistent delivery<br />
    42. 42. 34<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Boundary Conditions for the Process Module<br />What you’re trying to achieve with the process<br />What goes into the process…<br />What comes out of the process…<br />Sets expectations for the process<br />Significant elements of the process<br />34<br />
    43. 43. 35<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Service Blueprint<br />“You are here” in the service<br />Life Cycle Diagram<br />Tangible deliverables or results<br />produced by the service<br />Events and outcomes experienced by the customer during the service<br />Service delivery actions in contact with the customer<br />Service delivery actions out of<br />direct view of the customer<br />Background processes or connection points to other services processes<br />Storyboard<br />for Service Delivery<br />Systems and tools which play a role in the service; backstage documents<br />
    44. 44. 36<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Show the workflow and the connection to the customer experience<br />Identify action performers by role<br />Integrate automated tasks into the workflow<br />Document the 80% path - provide links to “exception” handling<br />Show where templates and reference docs are used<br />Document systems used to automate the service<br />
    45. 45. Define the Boundary Conditions<br />37<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Include entry conditions or “triggers”<br />Include exit conditions and links to next process<br />
    46. 46. 38<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    47. 47. Process Doesn’t Happen By Osmosis<br />39<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Key Success Factors for Process Improvement:<br /><ul><li>Executive Support
    48. 48. Member Involvement
    49. 49. Clear Objectives</li></ul>The Standish Group 1999<br /><ul><li>Small milestones
    50. 50. Proper planning
    51. 51. Ownership</li></li></ul><li>What is Kaizen?<br />Kaizen (改善), is Japanese for “Change for the Better” or continuous, incremental process improvement<br /><ul><li>Key Tenets:</li></ul>Customer value<br />Performance improvement<br />Continuous, incremental improvement<br />Team centered<br />New Process<br />Launch<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />New Process<br />Launch<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />vs.<br />Process<br />Capability<br />Process<br />Capability<br />Time<br />Time<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc.<br />40<br />
    52. 52. Deming Improvement Cycle<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc.<br />41<br />Act<br />Plan<br />Do<br />Check<br />
    53. 53. Kaizen Blitz<br />42<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Day 1<br />Day 2<br />Day 3<br />Day 4<br />Day 5<br />Initial Event Planning Session<br />[<br />[<br />Act<br />Plan<br />Do<br />Check<br />Plan<br />Do<br />Check<br />Act<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />Kaizen<br />Blitz<br />Process<br />Capability<br />Time<br />Short, intense period to deploy a process module<br />“Tiger Team” singularly focused implementation<br />Event focus is well defined – no room for scope creep<br />Results should be evident, significant, and rapid<br />3 Phases to the Kaizen Blitz (align with Deming cycle)<br />Do<br />Plan<br />Check<br />Act<br />Planning<br />Kaizen Blitz<br />Follow-up<br />(a Deming Cycle occurs within the event as well)<br />
    54. 54. Kaizen Blitz<br />43<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Act<br />Do<br />Plan<br />Check<br />Process Training and Rollout<br />Event Kickoff<br />Process Improvement Testing<br />Process Improvement Development<br />Conference Room Pilot<br />Sustainability Planning<br />Service Blueprint Update<br />Work Plan Development<br />Event Wrap Up<br />
    55. 55. 44<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />4 Steps to a Process Framework<br />IMPROVE<br />1<br />2<br />3<br />4<br />Establish the<br />Value<br />Proposition<br />Design the<br />Service<br /> Architecture<br />Engineer<br />the Process<br />Modules <br />Deploy<br />The<br />Processes<br />Service Blueprintingframework<br />
    56. 56. 45<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Achieving the Value Proposition…<br />Define the Value Proposition<br />Customer<br />Needs<br />Service<br />Results<br />Drive<br />Service Design<br />Service<br />Process<br />Design<br />Service Execution<br />Achieve the Value Proposition<br />Customer<br />Needs<br />Service<br />Results<br />Service<br />Process<br />Satisfy<br />Yields<br />Consistently!!!<br />
    57. 57. 46<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Questions for you…<br />Does the Value Proposition for your services provide you with a competitive advantage?<br />Are you prepared to consistentlydeliver on that value proposition?<br />If not, what are you doing about it?<br />
    58. 58. 47<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Preview of AntFarmService Offerings<br />
    59. 59. 48<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Service Blueprintingfor Managed Services<br />If growth of your Managed Services business is hindered by a lack of process…<br />Typical Challenges:<br />Limited depth to existing processes<br />It takes People, Tools, and Processes for best-in-class managed services<br />MSPs must be able to differentiate themselves through both value and delivery<br />Lack of skills or time to develop process<br />A Managed Services Blueprint provides the solid foundation required for MSP sales and delivery:<br />Detailed blueprint which can be rolled out with a high probability of successful delivery<br />Service features expressly meet defined end-customer needs and business objectives<br />Strong foundation for the development of deliverables and underlying service delivery procedures<br />= repeatable<br />= value prop<br />MSP Factory<br />Craftsman<br />= everything ties<br />
    60. 60. Service Blueprint Bricks<br />49<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Life Cycle Diagram<br />Module Overview Diagram<br />Service Blueprint<br />Off-the-Shelf Process Modules:<br /><ul><li>“Personalized” with your corporate identity, roles, and systems
    61. 61. Priced approximately $150 to $450 per module</li></li></ul><li>50<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Service Blueprint BricksBenefits<br />Comprehensive high-value service offering, built one brick at a time:<br /><ul><li>In-depth AntFarm templates
    62. 62. Low cost of entry
    63. 63. Personalized for faster adoption
    64. 64. Can be customized</li></li></ul><li>From one of our clients:<br />“AntFarm is the best operations investment we made at PlanIT Solutions. We thought we were very good at how we ran our business until AntFarm forced us to examine deeply the processes behind all aspects of our business. We realized that with some hard work we could dramatically improve our operational efficiencies.”<br />“AntFarm helped us accelerate improvements in our processes in a very short time. The paybacks were immediate. Right out of the gate the changes to our on boarding process tremendously improved our customer satisfaction and our retention rate.”<br />51<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />
    65. 65. 52<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Questions?<br />
    66. 66. 53<br />Copyright © 2010 AntFarm, Inc. All Rights Reserved<br />Thanks for joining us today<br />Customer<br />Needs<br />Service<br />Results<br />Satisfy<br />Contact us for help in designing value into your services!<br />1-888-AntFarm<br />info@antfarm-inc.com<br />

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