Handouts 11 17 10

4,887 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,887
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Handouts 11 17 10

  1. 1. CURRICULUM AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION SOCIAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT NATIONAL HISTORY DAY TEACHER TRAINING NOVEMBER 17, 2010 CLARK HIGH SCHOOL 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. AGENDA: • Welcome and Introductions: 4:00 p.m.-4:05 p.m. o Karlye Mull, Project Facilitator, K-12 Social Studies o NHD Teacher Letter (h) • National History Day College Park, Maryland: 4:05 p.m.-4:30 p.m. o Photos o Teacher, Student, & Parent Testimonials Linda Garman, Rancho HS Sarah and Sally Niederman, LVA Erin and Brandon Franke, Saville MS • Why Study History?: 4:30 p.m.-4:45 p.m. o History matters o NHD Research Research skills Critical thinking skills Writing skills Civic engagement • 2011 NHD Theme-Debate & Diplomacy: 4:45 p.m.-5:30 p.m. o 2011 NHD Theme (h) & NHD Sample Topics (h) o Nevada topics o Thinking Thematically (h) • Southern Nevada NHD Contest: 5:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m. o Process o Categories Changes to website category o Date and location o NHD CD OUTCOMES • As a participant in today’s session, you will have the opportunity to… o learn about research that supports the use of NHD in classroom instruction o learn about the 2011 NHD theme, Debate & Diplomacy o learn about the process for implementing NHD in the social studies classroom 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 1
  2. 2. National History Day in Nevada Karlye Mull Project Facilitator, K-12 Social Studies Curriculum and Professional Development Division Dear Social Studies Educator! I hope that you all had a smooth start to your school year! Though it may seem early, now is the time to begin thinking about starting students on their National History Day projects! This year’s state contest will be on Saturday, April 2, 2011 at the Northwest Career and Technical Academy, 8200 W. Tropical Parkway, Las Vegas, 89149. The 2011 National History Day theme is Debate & Diplomacy In History: Successes, Failures, and Consequences. This theme lends itself to easy application in all middle and high school social studies classes, including U.S. History, Geography, World History, and Government. NVNHD Teacher workshop: This workshop will provide new and veteran NVNHD teachers with suggestions and strategies for implementing National History Day in their classrooms. Current NVNHD teachers will be sharing their tips and strategies for the successful implementation of NVNHD in the classroom. This professional development opportunity will take place on Wednesday, November 17, 2010 in the Clark High School Library from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm. Registration is available on Pathlore. NVNHD CD: This year NVNHD materials are being provided in the form of a training website on a CD. This CD contains the NHD theme book, 2011 NHD rulebook, the NVNHD curriculum guide, 2011 State contest dates and entry form, and most anything else you need to successfully implement NVNHD in your classroom! You will receive a copy of the training materials CD at the November workshop. If you would like to get started before the November 17 training, please check out the National History Day website at www.nhd.org. Click on Contest and then Getting Started. Educational Value of NVNHD: Based on a national evaluation conducted last school year, students participating in National History Day have shown evidence of being better writers, able to write for a purpose, using real voice; use solid evidence to support their point of view; are critical thinkers who can digest, analyze, and synthesize information; and are better prepared to conduct college-level research than their peers who do not participate in National History Day. This valuable research demonstrates the power of the National History Day program in creating historical thinkers who are engaged by inquiry. As with every year, we look to expand the number students competing at the state competition. Your participation and support of Nevada National History Day will assist our students in becoming competitive in a 21 st century society. Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions you may have regarding Nevada National History Day. Best, Karlye Mull, Project Facilitator, K-12 Social Studies 799-8464 kjmull@interact.ccsd.net 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 2
  3. 3. National History Day Introduction for Educators Authentic History, Authentic Student Historians Presented by Karlye Mull, Project Facilitator, K-12 Social Studies Curriculum and Professional Development Division What is History? • What does history mean to you? • What does history mean t t d t ?to your students? • What do you want your students to take away from your class? Why Study History? • History Matters! o It’s an active process of study and inquiry - not just passive memorization • Arena for development of cross-curricular skillsof cross-curricular skills o Research o Writing o Technology o Reading o Inquiry o Critical thinking o Analysis Why Study History? “True historical understanding requires students to engage in historical thinking; to raise questions and to marshal solid evidence in support of their answers; to go beyond the facts presented in their textbooks and examine the historical record themselves” -National Standards for History National Center for History in the Schools Why National History Day? • Students learn by doing. o Would you teach a chemistry class without having your students do experiments? • Students learn history by doing history. o National History Day is the lab component of youry y p y history class. Why NHD?? NHD Research Study on Applied Skills, Academic  Performance, & Interest in History and Civic Engagement • Conducted in 4 sites around the country • Data collection included performance assessments,  surveys, and standardized test scores • The study explored students’  The Research Shows….. research and writing skills ability to interpret historical information Academic performance Interest in past and current events 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 3
  4. 4. Findings: Applied Skills •What skills do NHD students gain? •Can they apply those skills? •How do they compare to their peers? Research Skills Compared to peers… • Almost twice as many NHD high school students correctly  identified primary sources (pre, 80% vs. 48%; post, 85% vs.  48%)48%).  • NHD students see a wider range of sources—experts,  museums, lecture notes, diaries, journals, films, first‐person  accounts, biographies.  • NHD students have a better understanding of how to  evaluate sources.  Critical Thinking Skills Compared to peers… • NHD students are better at interpreting information, drawing  conclusions summarizing passages scoring 10 & 20 percentageconclusions, summarizing passages—scoring 10 & 20 percentage  points higher than peers. • The more time in the program, the higher their scores.  Writing Skills • NHD students out‐scored peers on 2 assessments: • Pre‐test means:  3.5 vs. 2.6 • Post‐test means: 3.8 vs. 2.9 • Differences: sense of audience, distinct voice, organization,  sentence variety, richer vocabulary. Findings: Interest in History & Civic  Engagement Are NHD students more confident,  interested, & engaged? Confidence Compared to peers, NHD students are more confident in… • their knowledge of history (M=2.9 vs. 2.5)  t t t di d i h l (2 7 2 5)• events not studied in school (2.7 vs. 2.5) • ability to develop a research plan (M=2.9 vs. 2.7)  • ability to organize a report (3.1 vs. 2.9) • doing internet research (M=3.4 vs. 3.2) & using (3.4 vs. 3.1)  & evaluating what they find (3.2 vs. 2.9). 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 4
  5. 5. 2011 NHD Theme Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences Debate & Diplomacy in History • Topics must be an example of debate or diplomacy in history (or both) • Think about the definition of the words o Debate o Diplomacy • Successes, Failures, Consequences o Don't forget about the second half of the theme o Will help students to ask good questions about the significance of their topic in history Nevada Topics 1. Nevada Statehood – “Battle Born 2. Mining Strikes in Nevada ~ 1881 in Lewis (Lander  County); 1907 in Goldfield 3. Yucca Mountain 4. Federal ownership of lands in Nevada 5 Relocation of Indian tribes5. Relocation of Indian tribes 6. Indian gaming 7. Testing of the atomic bomb in the Nevada desert 8. Water rights 9. The Moulin Rouge hotel & African American  entertainers in the 1950’s Topic Brainstorm What topics from your curriculum are examples of debate or diplomacy in history? Tips for Picking Topics • Is your topic too new? o Avoid current events… Delve into a part of history! o More than 20 years in the past as a rule of thumb The contemporary debate over immigration in Arizona The 1924 Immigration Act: Quotas and the debate over who can come to America 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 5
  6. 6. Tips for Picking Topics Is your topic too broad? • Narrow topic by time period, people, event, or geographic area. • Look at something specific related to the broad topic The entire history of slavery in the United States The debate over slavery during the Constitutional Convention The NHD Process Research Analyze Present The Three Hats of the Historian Research • Students research their topics using primary and secondary sources • Builds information and media literacy "During my research I was able to visit the archives... I found that often the primary sources had better opinions and more meaningful information than the compiled secondary sources." Analyze • Students become historians • Analyze their findings and discuss significance of topic in history • Builds inquiry, critical thinking, and analysis skills Presentation • Students present their research in one of several creative formats: o Exhibits o Documentaries o Website o Performances o Papers (individuals only) Exhibits • Similar to what you might see in a museum • Uses text, images, objects, etc. to make an argumentargument • Up to 6' tall, 40" wide, and 30" deep • 500 student-composed words • Most popular NHD category 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 6
  7. 7. Documentaries • Similar to what you might see on PBS or the History Channel • 10-minute media presentation • Great category for students• Great category for students who like technology and have a visual topic Performances • 10-minute dramatic performance • Conveys argument, evidence • Uses scripts, props, costumes, tetc. • Great category for performers who love to be on stage: actors, singers, dancers, etc. • Sarah Niederman, LVA Papers • Individual papers only - no group entries • 1,500-2,500 word paper about an historical topic • Includes citations:• Includes citations: footnotes, endnotes, or other internal documentation • Great category for aspiring writers Web Sites • Exciting, new category! • 1,200 student-composed words, 100 MB size limit • Incorporates text, images media and moreimages, media, and more to make and support an argument • Created using the NHD Website Editor - provided free online 1. Individual and Group are now separate categories 2. Must use the NHD website editor accessed at: http://nhd.weebly.com/ 3. File size ~ still 100 MB; however, no need to check file size as Weebly  won’t allow anything bigger 4. Multimedia Usage: • No limit to the number of pieces BUT no clip may be longer than 45  seconds (e.g. background music must be looped) 5. Annotated Bibliography and Process Paper should: B f h b i Website Category Changes Be a part of the website Be integrated into navigational structure of the website NOT be printed and sent in  Is NOT included in the word count 6. DEADLINE:  Websites are closed for judging at 5pm on March 30th. 7. Copyrighted music/songs may not be used (unless permission has been  granted to do so) ~ recommend that students use websites such as  “Limewire” or “Freeplay Music” 8. No narration of student composed text 9. Footnotes, Endnotes, or internal documentation NOT required State History Day • Saturday, April 2, 2011 • Northwest Career & Technical Academy • 8200 W. Tropical Pkwy Las VegasPkwy, Las Vegas, 89149 • 7:30 Registration • 3:00 Awards • 4:00 Winners’ Meeting 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 7
  8. 8. The NHD Timetable • Remember the Basics: Research, Analyze, Present o Introduce History Day and theme o Help students choose topics o Mentor their research and analysis o Guide their project creation Evaluate their worko Evaluate their work The NHD Timetable Remember: Can be shorter or longer depending on your needs. • November/December: o Introduce program and theme o Topic selection o Begin research • January o Continue into more advanced research o Analysis and argument o Draft projects • February, March o Project creation o Feedback and revisions • April, May, June o NHD competition cycle Resources Resources you may not have considered (for students) 1. ABC‐CLIO 2. Library of Congress 3. National Archives 4. Eyewitness to History 5. ONE ~ Online Nevada Encyclopedia 6 N d St t M Vi t l T6. Nevada State Museum Virtual Tours  7. GOOGLE Images (Can do an advanced search) 8. Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History 9. EDSITEment (for teacher use)  http://edsitement.neh.gov/tab_websites.asp 10. NNCSS website resource list (for teacher use):  http://www.nvsocialstudies.com/resources.html 1. State Contest Location:  Northwest Career & Technical  Academy, 8200 W. Tropical Parkway, Las Vegas, 89149 2. Contest Deadlines: Entry Cards due March 25, 2011 NHD Competition April 2, 2011 3.  On the teacher training CD • Rubric for judging entries Details, Details, Details……. • Sample judges questions • 2011 NHD Rulebook 4.  Revised Entry Form • Teacher phone number (last 4 digits used for registering  for NHD) • URL ~ If a student is entering a website their URL MUST be on the entry form!! Want your teachers and students to get involved? Southern Nevada Competition, Saturday, April 2, 2011 NWCTA, 8200 W. Tropical Pkwy, Las Vegas, 89149 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 8
  9. 9. Congratulations on your decision to become a National History Day Scholar! You are joining more than half a million students studying history by doing history! No longer will your knowledge of history be measured by the correct answers to the predetermined questions at the end of the chapter or how often you lug a 1000-page history book home only to fall asleep, drooling on the couch, after two pages of the chapter. National History Day (NHD) wants you to become the historian! You decide on a topic. You find the sources. You determine the consequences based on the evidence. After you finish your research, you have a choice on how to tell the story. You may choose to create a historical performance, paper, web site, documentary or an exhibit. NHD puts you in control of your learning. Let’s get started. First, begin with the theme: Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences. If you have participated in National History Day before you know the theme is always broad enough to include research topics at the community, state, national or world history level. The theme is important because historical research requires more than a detailed description of an event. The theme helps you ask questions and think deeply about your topic. Examine the arguments for and against. Explain the historical consequences of the outcome of the debate or diplomatic event. Whose success is it? Whose failure? Excellent topics that are not connected to the theme can quickly become poor research projects. The best way to understand the theme is to define each word. The first two words, Debate and Diplomacy are broad categories. Your topic will be on a debate or a diplomatic event. Sometimes you will find a topic that fits under both debate and diplomacy but that is not required. To understand all the possible meanings for the words go to the dictionary with a partner, think about different meanings and National History Day 2011 Theme: DEBATE & DIPLOMACY IN HISTORY: SUCCESSES, FAILURES, CONSEQUENCES By Ann Claunch Ann Claunch is the director of curriculum for National History Day brainstorm possible research topics under each definition. The key to topic selection is the ability to articulate its connection to the theme. What are examples of debates? A debate is defined as an argument, a dispute or a deliberation. Famous debates like the Lincoln/Douglas debates over slavery, Aristotle and Plato discussing “nature versus nurture” or the impact of the Kennedy/Nixon televised presidential debates on political campaigns are interesting topics. But so are debates concerning civil liberties. Who should be allowed to vote? A paper or an exhibit on the 15th or the 19th amendments or a web site of Anna Howard Shaw’s Fundamental Principles of Representation, are excellent NHD projects. With this theme, the amendments to The Constitution or Supreme Court cases can be mined for topic ideas. CAUTION! Always think historically. Be careful not to focus on present day debates and don’t forget local topics! What about censorship? If you are interested in music you might consider a web site or an exhibit about the debate surrounding the innovative music of Johann Sebastian Bach in the 17th century or Giuseppe Verdi’s suggestive opera lyrics in the 19th century. What about the 1955 debate proposing a connection between rock music and juvenile delinquency or The Buckley Report and the heated debate correlating rock music to drug abuse? Consider reform movements! New ideas introduced are always debated. You might write a paper about the Hull House, the establishment of the Tuskegee Institute or the formation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Other possibilities are a web site about the controversy surrounding the publication of Upton Sinclair’s book The Jungle or a documentary on A Red Record by Ida B. Wells. From world history you can do a documentary on Martin Luther’s 95 theses or Emile by John Jacque Rousseau. 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 9
  10. 10. For more information, contact: National History Day, Inc. 0119 Cecil Hall, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 301.314.9739 info@nhd.org www.nhd.org Refer to web site for local contest dates and information. National Contest: June 12–16, 2011 How about women? What types of jobs should women be employed to do? Should both sexes have equal treatment under the law and receive equal pay for the same job? In answers to these questions, you might create a documentary on the impact and legacy of Title IX legislation or a performance on the Seneca Falls conference. What about the change in women’s fashion in the 1920s? A web site on the role of women in the 1830s or the debate surrounding Betty Friedan’s book, The Feminine Mystique, in the 1960s are topic options. What about diplomacy? Diplomacy is defined in the most simplistic terms as international affairs. When nations collide in ideological differences or battle over resources the result may demand a diplomatic solution. An international conference, a treaty or a summit of historical significance are examples of research topics related to Diplomacy in History. Although diplomacy usually evokes an international disagreement, be alert to other possibilities. Researching the early 18th century about land ownership in the United States and treaties with the Native Americans involved diplomacy and its consequences. The Black Hawk War of 1832 in the U.S. and The Lancaster Treaty of 1744 are examples of research topics that had immediate impact which resulted in a legacy of treatment. What are national and international topic ideas? The Dayton Peace Accords, NAFTA, the Geneva Convention or Nixon’s 1972 visit to China are international topics that changed history. Careful analysis of the Salt Treaties in a web site, a documentary on the Munich Agreement of 1938 or a paper on Ben Franklin’s trip to England reveals varying diplomatic outcomes. What about the carefully orchestrated diplomatic pressure during the 1980s by President Ronald Reagan on Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev regarding The Berlin Wall and communism? Don’t forget diplomacy topics on the national front. You might consider an exhibit on the impact of The Missouri Compromise or a web site about the Guadalupe Hildalgo land grant or a performance on the Smoot Hawley Act. No matter what your interests are, you canfindahistoricaltopictoresearch with Debate and Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences. For instance, if you are interested in affairs of the state, you might create a performance on the impact of Albert J. Beveridge’s The March of the Flag by exploring the debate between isolationists and interventionists in the Spanish American War. What about a web site on the two sides of the Cuban Missile Crisis? Was diplomacy a success? Other possibilities are a paper or an exhibit explaining the debate over The League of Nations or the South East Asia Treaty. What happens when diplomacy fails? Thesecondpartofthetheme,Successes,Failures,Consequences,includes words to use as a thinking backboard or to bounce your topic off. These words help you analyze your topic by raising questions that you will need to answer as you research. What made your topic a success or a failure? Was it a success in the beginning and then later determined a failure? For whom? Why or why not? Was an important group of people‘s voices silenced? And the most important word—consequences. How does your topic have long term impact? How did it change history? Your interpretation of the consequences and historical significance of your topic should be based on your research and supported by evidence. Always examine your topic for the short-term consequences and the long-term change. Debate and Diplomacy in History is an exciting theme because you can find topics everywhere. Start by talking to everyone about possible topic ideas and reading widely. Ask your parents, your teachers, your friends. You can search the Internet. Peruse your textbook and your school library. Carry a notebook and write down ideas. When you have a list, circle the topics you want to know more about and go to the library to begin researching! 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 10
  11. 11. 10 Debate & Diplomacy in History: Successes, Failures, Consequences National History Day 2011 11 SAMPLE TOPICS Lone Wolf v. Hitchcock (1903): Debated Rights Kill the Indian and Save the Man:The Impact of Indian Boarding Schools: Debated Philosophies Educational Amendment Act: Equality Debated Broadening Boundaries—Shrinking limitations the question of slavery in the Northwest Sample Topics ARCIdentifier595010/LocalIdentifierRG241:Patent47,631,Sheet1.ItemfromRecord Group241:RecordsofthePatentandTrademarkOffice,1836-1973 TOPIC SUCCESSES FAILURES CONSEQUENCES DEBATE Constitutional Convention 1787 The Constitutional Convention succeeded in continuous unity of the nation The Constitutional Convention ignored the slavery question Civil War DIPLOMACY Yalta Conference Yalta Conference succeeded in bringing the U.S., England and Russia into diplomatic dialogue U.S. and Britain compromised too much resulting in the establishment of the Eastern Block Spread of Communism Suggested Teaching Idea: Debate and Diplomacy Semantic Map National Archives and Records Administration United States Library of Congress National Archives and Records Administration Debate and Diplomacy in History Worksheet For the Teacher: In the diagram below, demonstrate to students how to expand a topic and explore successes, failures and consequences, using The Constitutional Convention and The Yalta Conference as examples. Next, ask pairs of students to select two or three topics on the sample topic list on page 10. Working together, students conduct preliminary research and complete the form by adding information about the topics that were selected. Finally, the students present the topics they researched and what was discovered. 11/15/2010 CPDD K-12 Social Studies 11
  12. 12. D U.S./NEVA 4. 4.2 5. 5.4 5.10 6. 6.4 7. 7.1 8. 8.7 WORLD G 2. 2.9 2.10 3. 3.12 Debate and ADA HISTORY WESTWARD STUDENTS W FEDERALISM INFORMATIO (1, 7) [NS: H3 SLAVERY, A STUDENTS W RESISTANCE OPPONENTS INFORMATIO (1, 2, 8) [NS: STUDENTS W EFFECTS OF (1, 2, 8) [NS: WESTWARD STUDENTS W AFFECT MOD (1, 4, 8) [NS: THE INDUST STUDENTS W OF THE INDU NEVADA AND SECONDARY (1, 5, 8) [NS: BECOMING A STUDENTS W LITERATURE IMPERIALISM (1, 8) [NS: C GEOGRAPHY 8 UNDERSTAN STUDENTS W RESOURCES DEVELOP IN (4, 8) [NS: G STUDENTS W AMERICA US DEMOGRAPH (7, 8) [NS: G UNDERSTAN STUDENTS W IN EUROPE B (2, 3, 5, 7, 8) d Diplomac To Y 7–1260 EXPANSION WILL EXPLAIN M AND NATION ON ORALLY, IN 3.(6-8).7] BOLITION, AN WILL EXAMINE E OF THE ENS S OF SLAVERY ON FROM VAR H2.(6-8).18, H WILL IDENTIFY F THE CIVIL W H2.(6-8).20] MOVEMENT WILL EXAMINE DERN FOREIG H4.(6-8).11] RIAL REVOLU WILL EXPLORE USTRIAL REVO D THE UNITED Y SOURCES. H3.(6-8).8] A WORLD POW WILL DEMONS E SWAYED PU M BY UTILIZIN C15.(6-8).5] 8 – 2280 DING LATIN A WILL DISCUSS S IN LATIN AM FORMED OPI G8.(6-8).4] WILL DEFEND SING CRITICAL HIC CONCEPT G5.(6-8).3-4, G6 NDING EUROP WILL DETERM BY COLLABOR [NS: H2.(6-8) Nevada H cy in Histor pics and Co THE STRUGG NAL IDENTITY N WRITING, AN ND THE CIVIL E THE INSTITU SLAVED, AND Y, AND ITS EC RIED SOURCE H3.(6-8).17] Y AND DESCR WAR BY UTILIZ E HOW DECIS GN COMMERC UTION AND PR E THE CAUSE OLUTION AND D STATES BY WER (IMPERIA STRATE HOW UBLIC OPINION G AND/OR CR AMERICA IN S S THE IMPACT MERICA BY SE NIONS. A SPATIAL D L THINKING, P TS BY CONDU 6.(6-8).7, G7.(6 PE IN SPATIAL MINE THE CAU RATING WITH .27] History Day ry: Success orrelating S GLE BETWEEN IN THE UNITE ND/OR THROU WAR UTIONALIZATI ONGOING ST CONOMIC AND S TO DEVELO RIBE THE IMM ZING AND/OR C SIONS MADE I CE BY CONDU ROGRESSIVE ES, EVENTS, M D EXPLAIN TH UTILIZING AN ALISM) PROPAGAND N TO SUPPOR REATING MAP SPATIAL TERM T OF NATURA EKING INFOR ECISION REG POINT OF VIEW UCTING RESEA 6-8).1, G7.(6-8) L TERMS SES AND CON PEERS. y 2011 ses, Failure Standards N STATES’ RIG ED STATES BY UGH TECHNO ION OF SLAVE TRUGGLE BET D SOCIAL IMP OP INFORMED EDIATE OUTC CREATING MA N THE SETTL UCTING RESEA E ERA MAJOR INVEN EIR IMPACT O ND/OR INTERP DA IN POLITICA RT AND OPPO PS, GRAPHS, A MS AL HAZARDS O RMATION FRO GARDING THE W, GEOGRAP ARCH. ).2] NSEQUENCES es, Conseq GHTS AND Y PRESENTIN LOGY PRESE ERY IN AMER TWEEN PROP ORTANCE BY D OPINIONS. COMES AND L APS, GRAPHS EMENT OF TH ARCH. NTIONS, AND T ON THE WAY PRETING PRIM AL ADVERTIS OSE UNITED S AND DIAGRAM ON THE HUMA OM VARIED SO HISTORICAL PHIC VOCABU S OF POLITIC quences NG ENTATIONS. ICA, THE ONENTS AND Y SEEKING LONG TERM S, AND DIAGR HE WEST TECHNOLOGI OF LIFE IN MARY AND SING AND TATES MS. AN AND PHYS OURCES TO EVENTS OF L LARY, AND AL REVOLUTI D RAMS. ES ICAL LATIN IONS
  13. 13. 3.17 STUDENTS WILL DEFEND A SPATIAL DECISION REGARDING THE HISTORICAL EVENTS OF EUROPE; E.G., THE CRUSADES, TRADE, AND THE PLAGUE ON SOCIETY DURING THE MIDDLE AGES; USING CRITICAL THINKING, POINT OF VIEW, GEOGRAPHIC VOCABULARY, AND DEMOGRAPHIC CONCEPTS BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (7, 8) [NS: H1.(6-8).23, H4.(6-8).10, G5.(6-8).3, G6.(6-8).4, G6.(6-8).7, G7.(6-8).1-2] 4. UNDERSTANDING ASIA IN SPATIAL TERMS 4.6 STUDENTS WILL LOCATE MAJOR CIVILIZATIONS, ANCIENT THROUGH CURRENT, IN ASIA AND DESCRIBE HOW AND WHY THESE CHANGED OVER TIME BY UTILIZING TEXT READING STRATEGIES. (1, 2, 4, 8) [NS: G6.(6-8).2] 5. UNDERSTANDING THE MIDDLE EAST IN SPATIAL TERMS 5.1 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE PHYSICAL AND HUMAN FEATURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST INCLUDING THE ABSOLUTE LOCATION (LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE) AND RELATIVE LOCATION TO IDENTIFY PROMINENT COUNTRIES, CITIES, AND PHYSICAL FEATURES BY UTILIZING AND/OR CREATING MAPS, GRAPHS, AND DIAGRAMS. (1, 2, 6, 8) [NS: G5.(6-8).5, G6.(6-8).1, G6.(6-8).9] 6. UNDERSTANDING AFRICA IN SPATIAL TERMS 6.5 STUDENTS WILL IDENTIFY PATTERNS OF RURAL AND URBAN SETTLEMENTS IN DEVELOPING AND DEVELOPED COUNTRIES BY UTILIZING TEXT READING STRATEGIES. (2, 4, 7) [NS: G7.(6-8).4] 7. UNDERSTANDING AUSTRALIA, OCEANIA, AND ANTARCTICA IN SPATIAL TERMS 7.7 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE AND EVALUATE CHANGES THAT RESULT FROM THE HUMAN MODIFICATION OF AUSTRALIA, OCEANIA, AND ANTARCTICA’S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT INCLUDING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY AND THE GLOBAL IMPACT BY UTILIZING TEXT READING STRATEGIES. (3, 4, 7, 8) [NS: G8.(6-8).1-3] 8. UNDERSTANDING THE WORLD IN SPATIAL TERMS THROUGH COMPARATIVE & CURRENT GEOGRAPHIC ISSUES 8.6 STUDENTS WILL IDENTIFY A REGIONAL OR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC ISSUE AND EXPLAIN IT FROM A SPATIAL PERSPECTIVE INCLUDING THE ROLE OF COMPROMISE IN THE RESOLUTION OF THE ISSUE USING CRITICAL THINKING, POINT OF VIEW, GEOGRAPHIC VOCABULARY, AND DEMOGRAPHIC CONCEPTS BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (3, 4, 7, 8) [NS: G7.(6-8).5, G8.(6-8).8, C13.(6-8).2] WORLD HISTORY – 7010 4. EXPLORATION 4.4 STUDENTS WILL COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE EFFECTS OF EXPLORATION ON BOTH EUROPEAN AND COLONIAL SOCIETIES BY SEEKING INFORMATION FROM VARIED SOURCES TO DEVELOP INFORMED OPINIONS. (1, 2, 7, 9) [NS: H2, G7.(9-12).2, G7.(9-12).5] 5. ENLIGHTENMENT AND REVOLUTION 5.4 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE THE FACTORS THAT LED TO THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (1, 6, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).16] 6. NATION-BUILDING AND INDUSTRIALIZATION 6.2 STUDENTS WILL EXPLAIN THE CHANGING ROLES OF CLASS AND GENDER AS A RESULT OF ECONOMIC CHANGES DURING THE INDUSTRIAL, AMERICAN, AND FRENCH REVOLUTIONS BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (1, 2, 7, 8) [NS: H3.(9-12).22] 7. WORLD WARS 7.1 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE AND INTERPRET THE CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF WORLD WAR I INCLUDING THE ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL IMPACT BY UTILIZING AND/OR INTERPRETING
  14. 14. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES. (1, 6, 8) [NS: H4.(9-12).1, H4.(9-12).14] 7.4 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE CAUSES OF WORLD WAR II, INCLUDING THE LEGACY OF WORLD WAR I AND THE RISE OF TOTALITARIAN STATES BY APPLYING WRITING STRATEGIES. (6, 7, 8) [NS: H2.(9-12).11] 8. COLD WAR AND BEYOND 8.5 STUDENTS WILL SYNTHESIZE THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE USSR BREAKUP INCLUDING THE INTERNATIONAL AND ECONOMIC FACTORS THAT CONTRIBUTED TO THE END OF THE COLD WAR AND THE FORMATION OF NEW NATIONS BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (1, 6, 8) [NS: H2.(9-12).22, H4.(9-12).15] 9. CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES 9.4 STUDENTS WILL COMPARE AND CONTRAST RACIAL SEGREGATION IN THE UNITED STATES WITH OTHER RACIAL AND SOCIAL POLICIES, INCLUDING APARTHEID IN SOUTH AFRICA BY COLLABORATING WITH PEERS. (1, 4, 6, 8) [NS: H3.(9-12).14] 9.8 STUDENTS WILL DETERMINE THE CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF GENOCIDAL CONFLICTS, E.G., THE HOLOCAUST, ARMENIA, BOSNIA, RWANDA, AND DARFUR, AND ANALYZE THE MORAL IMPLICATIONS OF THESE CONFLICTS AROUND THE WORLD BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (6, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).20, H3.(9-12).21] U.S. HISTORY – 7030 2. AMERICAN PROGRESSIVISM AND FOREIGN POLICY 2.11 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE MAJOR SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN THE UNITED STATES AND EXPLAIN THEIR IMPACT ON THE CHANGING SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CULTURE, I.E., THE POPULIST AND PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENTS BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (2, 4, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).5] 2.12 STUDENTS WILL COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE DOMESTIC POLICIES OF THEODORE ROOSEVELT, WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, AND WOODROW WILSON BY UTILIZING TEXT READING STRATEGIES. (2, 8, 9) [NS: H3] 3. FROM BOOM TO BUST 3.3 STUDENTS WILL EXAMINE SOCIAL TENSIONS IN THE POST-WORLD WAR I ERA, I.E., RADICAL POLITICS, IMMIGRATION RESTRICTIONS, INTERNAL MIGRATION, RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM, AND RACISM BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (2, 3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).6] 3.6 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE CAUSES OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION BY SEEKING INFORMATION FROM VARIED SOURCES TO DEVELOP INFORMED OPINIONS. (1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 9) [NS: H2.(9-12).9] 4. WORLD WAR II 4.3 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE AND INTERPRET THE IMPACT OF THE BOMBING OF PEARL HARBOR IN THE UNITED STATES BY UTILIZING AND/OR INTERPRETING PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES. (3, 8, 9) [NS: H2] 4.5 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF WORLD WAR II ON LIFE IN THE UNITED STATES BY APPLYING WRITING STRATEGIES. (2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H2] 5. COLD WAR CONFLICTS 5.5 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE EFFECTS OF THE COLD WAR ON UNITED STATES’ DEFENSE POLICY INCLUDING THE ARMS RACE, THE SPACE RACE, AND NUCLEAR TESTING BY UTILIZING AND/OR CREATING MAPS, GRAPHS, AND DIAGRAMS. (3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H4] 5.11 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE HOW POST-WORLD WAR II SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AUGMENTED UNITED STATES ECONOMIC STRENGTH, TRANSFORMED DAILY LIFE, AND INFLUENCED THE WORLD ECONOMY AND POLITICS BY SEEKING INFORMATION FROM VARIED
  15. 15. SOURCES TO DEVELOP INFORMED OPINIONS. (2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).10] 6. POST-WAR DOMESTIC AMERICA 6.4 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE ROLE OF MUSIC, ART, LITERATURE, AND TELEVISION IN SHAPING 1950S POPULAR CULTURE BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).23] 6.7 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE MAJOR ISSUES, EVENTS, AND KEY PEOPLE OF THE EARLY CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT INCLUDING DESEGREGATION OF FEDERAL JOBS AND THE ARMED FORCES; JACKIE ROBINSON BREAKING THE COLOR BARRIER; BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION; ROSA PARKS; AND THE INTEGRATION OF CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL IN LITTLE ROCK, ARK BY RESPONDING TO HISTORICAL TEXT/LITERATURE. (3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).9] 7. TURBULENT 1960S AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT 7.3 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE MAJOR ISSUES, EVENTS, AND KEY PEOPLE OF THE NATIVE AMERICAN RIGHTS MOVEMENT INCLUDING AMERICAN INDIAN MOVEMENT, WOUNDED KNEE, LAND CLAIMS, AND THE ALCATRAZ OCCUPATION BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3.(9-12).9] 7.9 STUDENTS WILL COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE GOALS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE DOMESTIC POLICIES BETWEEN PRESIDENT KENNEDY AND PRESIDENT JOHNSON BY UTILIZING AND/OR INTERPRETING PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES. (1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H2] 8. 1970S: DISCO AND DISILLUSION 8.2 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE FOREIGN POLICY OF RICHARD NIXON AND DETAIL THE AMERICAN WITHDRAWAL FROM VIETNAM BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (2, 3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H2, H3, H4] 8.8 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE EARLY ATTEMPTS AND EARLY ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION MOVEMENT BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (1, 2, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3, H4] 9. THE 1980S AND THE CONSERVATIVE REVOLUTION 9.3 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE DOMESTIC POLICIES OF RONALD REAGAN AND ASSESS THEIR IMPACT ON POLITICS INCLUDING THE RISE OF CONSERVATISM, REAGANOMICS, AND THE WAR ON DRUGS BY SEEKING INFORMATION FROM VARIED SOURCES TO DEVELOP INFORMED OPINIONS. (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3, H4] 9.5 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE THE ISSUES AND EVENTS INVOLVED IN THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION OF 1988 BY BY UTILIZING TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES. (2, 8, 9) [NS: H3, H4] 10. AMERICA IN THE AGE OF GLOBALIZATION 10.6 STUDENTS WILL EXPLAIN THE ECONOMIC, POLITICAL, AND TECHNOLOGICAL IMPACT ON THE UNITED STATES OF THE FOLLOWING CONFLICTS, I.E., KOREA, VIETNAM, PERSIAN GULF WAR, IRAQ, AND THE WAR ON TERROR BY APPLYING WRITING STRATEGIES. (1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H2.(9-12).15] 10.12 STUDENTS WILL EXPLORE THE INFLUENCE OF LEGAL AND ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION ON THE UNITED STATES BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (3, 6, 8, 9) [NS: H4.(9-12).10] 10.15 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE CHANGES IN DOMESTIC POLICY OF THE CURRENT UNITED STATES PRESIDENT AS COMPARED TO THE RECENT PAST PRESIDENTS BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (2, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9) [NS: H3, H4]
  16. 16. U.S. GOVERNMENT – 7050 1.0 CONSTITUTIONAL UNDERPINNINGS 1.2 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE THE MAJOR HISTORICAL EVENTS, DOCUMENTS, AND PEOPLE THAT INFLUENCED THE CREATION OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION, INCLUDING ENGLISH LAW, JUDEO-CHRISTIAN BELIEFS, THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR, AND THE ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION BY SEEKING INFORMATION FROM VARIED SOURCES TO DEVELOP INFORMED OPINIONS. (2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10) [NS: H2.(9-12).1; C13.(9-12).2] 1.4 STUDENTS WILL COMPARE AND CONTRAST THE COMPROMISES MADE DURING THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION BY APPLYING WRITING STRATEGIES. (2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10) [NS: C13] 1.5 STUDENTS WILL SUMMARIZE AND EVALUATE THE ARGUMENTS MADE DURING THE RATIFICATION OF THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION BY UTILIZING AND/OR CREATING MAPS, GRAPHS, AND DIAGRAMS. (2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10) [NS: C13] 3.0 CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES 3.1 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE THE UNITED STATES CONSTITUTION AND ITS AMENDMENTS IN PROTECTING INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT’S PROVISIONS FOR DUE PROCESS AND EQUAL PROTECTION OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS THROUGH THE EXAMINATION OF LANDMARK CASES BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10) [NS: C13.(9-12).5] 3.2 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE KEY EVENTS WHICH PLAYED A MAJOR ROLE IN THE STRUGGLE FOR THE EXPANSION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN RIGHTS DURING THE LATE 19 TH AND EARLY 20 TH CENTURIES BY UTILIZING TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES. (2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10) [NS: H3.(9-12).1, H3.(9-12).6] 3.3 STUDENTS WILL IDENTIFY, DESCRIBE, AND DISCUSS THE MAJOR ISSUES, EVENTS, AND PEOPLE OF MINORITY RIGHTS MOVEMENTS, E.G., CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964, BLACK POWER MOVEMENT, UNITED FARM WORKERS, AMERICAN INDIAN MOVEMENT, VIVA LA RAZA, WOMEN’S RIGHTS MOVEMENT, INCLUDING THE IMPACT THESE EVENTS HAD ON LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL GOVERNMENTS BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10) [NS: H3.(9-12).7, H3.(9-12).9] 3.6 STUDENTS WILL ANALYZE THE POWER OF JUDICIAL REVIEW AND SUMMARIZE THE IMPACT OF THE FEDERAL COURT SYSTEM ON CIVIL RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES BY APPLYING WRITING STRATEGIES. (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 9, 10) [NS: C14.(9-12).12] 7.0 PUBLIC POLICY 7.6 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE UNITED STATES PAST FOREIGN POLICY OBJECTIVES AND ACTIONS INCLUDING THE GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS’ ROLES IN DEVELOPING FOREIGN POLICY BY CONDUCTING RESEARCH. (3, 7, 8, 9, 10) [NS: G5.(9-12).1-2, G5.(9-12).8, G7.(9-12).1; E12.(9-12).3-4; C16.(9-12).2-4] 7.8 STUDENTS WILL DISCUSS THE STRUCTURE OF AND THE PURPOSE OF UNITED STATES MILITARY POLICY BY PRESENTING INFORMATION ORALLY, IN WRITING, AND/OR THROUGH TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS. (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10) [NS: C14.(9-12).1-3, C16.(9-12).3] 7.12 STUDENTS WILL DESCRIBE THE UNITED STATES’ POLICY CONCERNING STRATEGIC, POLITICAL, AND ECONOMIC INTERESTS ON THE MIDDLE EAST, LATIN AMERICA, MEXICO, IMMIGRATION, TRADE, AND THE ENVIRONMENT BY PROVIDING CONTEMPORARY EXAMPLES. (3, 7, 8, 9, 10) [NS: H4.(9-12).7; C16.(9-12).3] 

×