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Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
Rand Kannenberg   Communication Techniques With Offenders
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Rand Kannenberg Communication Techniques With Offenders

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  • 1. Corrections and Substance Abuse Training Communication Techniques with Offenders By Rand L. Kannenberg
  • 2. Goals/Objectives After participating in this workshop, you will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following communication techniques with clients. <ul><li>Opening Lines </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Attending and Psychological Attending </li></ul><ul><li>Clinical Listening </li></ul><ul><li>Support and Empathy </li></ul><ul><li>Exploration and Elaboration </li></ul><ul><li>Closing </li></ul>
  • 3. References <ul><li>Murphy, B., & Dillon, C. (1998). Interviewing in action: Process and practice. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole (and videotape included with book). </li></ul><ul><li>Kannenberg, R. (1994). Challenge Exam: Counseling Skills. Denver, CO: ADAD (videotape). </li></ul>
  • 4. Exercises Must be real life. No role playing. Will tell you if situation is about home, work or school; past or present.
  • 5. <ul><li>Contract </li></ul><ul><li>(Please write down on back of page.) </li></ul><ul><li>Will not get too private or personal. </li></ul><ul><li>Will say “no” or ask for help as needed. </li></ul><ul><li>Will maintain confidentiality about everyone else in training during breaks and after class. </li></ul>
  • 6. WHY do we want to be able to communicate with clients in community corrections? (Write down your answer. 1-3 sentences. Your neighbor will read it word for word to others.)
  • 7. Opening Lines <ul><li>Did the staff member avoid focal opening lines (directly setting the tone by talking about rules, expectations and guidelines) and use non-directive opening lines (less focus, less structure, letting the client set the tone and the agenda)? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 8. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a past relationship problem.
  • 9. x
  • 10. Physical Attending and Psychological Attending <ul><li>Did the staff member assume an open and welcoming body posture? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member occasionally sit or lean forward in the direction of the client? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member use minimal verbal prompts, encouragers or sounds (“I see,” “okay,” “go on,” “um/ah/aha,” etc.) to keep the conversation flowing and to show support for the client? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member pay attention to his or her own eye contact, hand gestures, head nods, other movements and facial expressions and use them appropriately? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 11. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a present relationship problem.
  • 12. x x x x
  • 13. Clinical Listening <ul><li>Did the staff member let the client tell his or her story? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member pay attention to specific words used by the client and repeat them? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member pay attention to themes (ideas or beliefs) and patterns (repetition or consistency) about client behavior revealed in client stories and comment on them? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member listen and watch for client feelings or affect and comment on them? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member pay attention to client thoughts and ideas and comment on them? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 14. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a past education problem.
  • 15. x x x x
  • 16. Support and Empathy <ul><li>Did the staff member show a warm and caring attitude toward the client (by smiling, making friendly comments and/or shaking hands)? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member emphasize client strengths? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member demonstrate empathy for the client (i.e., see the world from his or her perspective)? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member reflect the client’s physical statements by mirroring them (i.e., showing them their reflection)? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member reflect the content of the client’s perspective using the same or different words? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member reflect the feelings or affect of the client by using the same or different words? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 17. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a present education problem.
  • 18. x x x x
  • 19. Exploration and Elaboration <ul><li>Did the staff member avoid closed-ended questions (only requiring one or two word answers), “why” questions (sounding judgmental), directives hidden in questions (“are you going to do this?”), double questions (more than one question at a time), “ratatat” questioning (one question fired after another), and wrong questions/wrong time/wrong place? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member appropriately use open-ended questions (“talk about,” “tell me about,” “say more about,” etc.) silence (letting the client explore an answer), and “dot-dot-dot” reflection (inviting the client to finish the sentence)? </li></ul><ul><li>Did the staff member appropriately use underlining reflection (repeating and emphasizing important words), summarizing (repeating in condensed form many ideas expressed), and refocusing (returning the client to the topic)? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 20. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a past work related problem.
  • 21. x
  • 22. Closing <ul><li>Did the staff member acknowledge the end of the meeting, thank the client for contributing, wish him or her well and shake hands as well as making certain that everything that needed to be discussed was, and that there are plans made for the next meeting? </li></ul>(Murphy & Dillon, 1998)
  • 23. Demonstration of Skills Talk about a present work related problem.
  • 24. x

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