Activated Sludge Process and biological Wastewater treatment system

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  • Sybron Biochemical - Wastewater Unit Processes Distributor Training Seminar - 1999
  • Sybron Biochemical - Wastewater Unit Processes Distributor Training Seminar - 1999 Benefits : Simpleconstruction Low capital and O&M costs Simple operation Low solids production Energy recovery possible Flow and load equalization Drawbacks : Poor process control Significant odor potential Effluent normally requires additional treatment Significant land area required Typical Applications : Pretreatment of industrial wastewater prior to downstream biological treatment or municipal discharge. Pretreatment of municipal wastewater prior to facultative or aerated lagoon treatment, or natural treatment system.
  • Sybron Biochemical - Wastewater Unit Processes Distributor Training Seminar - 1999 Q = influent flowrate R = return sludge flowrate Q+R = Flow to 2 0 clarifier Q-W = effluent flowrate W = waste sludge flowrate MLSS mixed liquor suspended solids RAS - return activated sludge WAS - waste activated sludge
  • Std. methods 2540D Filtered through a std. glass fibre filter Dry to constant weight at 103 - 105 C, at least 1 hour
  • MLVSS Method = method 2540E Residue from MLSS test is ignited to constant weight at 550 C (usually 15 - 20 minutes fro 200 mg) Can have negative errors from appreciable volatile organics MLVSS = 75 - 85% of MLSS, but can be 50 - 95% The active MB portion of the MLVSS can be 1 - 45%, but is still the most widely used indicator Dr. Porge said act. sludge biomass = C 5 H 7 NO 2 i.e oxygen equiv= 5x32/113 = 1.42 mg O2/mg biomass
  • Case A = Slow settling = YOUNG, Underoxidized, Bulky Case B = Normal Case C Rapid settling = OLD, Overoxidized (maybe some denitrification apparent- more results needed)
  • Sybron Biochemical - Wastewater Unit Processes Distributor Training Seminar - 1999 Flows - Influent (Q), return sludge (R), waste sludge (W), effluent (Q+W). Organics - influent , pretreatment, and final effluent BOD and COD. Solids - TSS and VSS on mixed liquor (MLSS), return sludge (RAS), waste sludge (WAS). Also on influent, pretreatment effluent, and final effluent. Settleability - 30-min settling test (SV 30), sludge volume index (SVI), sludge bed depths. Oxygen - DO should be taken at different locations and times to determine if limiting conditions exist. DOUR trends provide clues for operational strategies.
  • Activated Sludge Process and biological Wastewater treatment system

    1. 1. Biological Wastewater Treatment (BOD & N removal) Prepared by Kalpesh Dankhara
    2. 2. Contents Wastewater treatment Importance Type of Pollutants Methods of Treatment Biological process as Wastewater Treatment Microorganisms (Type, Applications and Working) BOD removal Nitrogen removal (Type of Microbes, Environment condition & Operational parameter) Activated sludge process (Components, Monitoring & Operation)
    3. 3. Wastewater Treatment
    4. 4. Why Treat ?  Environmental Effects Image  Reuse Implications Potable Industrial  Regulatory Requirements
    5. 5. Types of Pollutants
    6. 6. 1) Suspended Solids 2) Dissolved Solids 3) Colloidal Solids Solids may be organic (eg. Phenol, oil, bacteria) or inorganic (eg. Salts, Ca, Mg, silt) in nature
    7. 7. The “Conventional” PollutantMeasures: Oxygen (BOD, COD, DO) Solids content (TS) Nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen) Acidity (pH) Bacteria (e.g., fecal coliform) Temperature
    8. 8. TS = TSS + TDS TSS=VSS+FSS TDS=VDS+FDS TS = TVS + TFSTS = organic + inorganic Metcalf & Eddy
    9. 9. Measurements of Gross OrganicContent  Dissolved Oxygen (DO)  Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)  Chemical oxygen demand (COD)  Total organic carbon (TOC)  Theoretical oxygen demand (ThOD)
    10. 10. Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD)  BOD:Oxygen is removed from water when organic matter is consumed by bacteria  Lowoxygen conditions may kill fish and other organisms http://www.lcusd.net/lchs/mewoldsen/Water_Pollution_LCHS.ppt
    11. 11. Chemical Oxygen Demand The quantity of oxygen used in biological and non-biological oxidation of materials in wastewater The determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) is used in municipal and industrial laboratories to measure the overall level of organic contamination in wastewater. The contamination level is determined by measuring the equivalent amount of oxygen required to oxidize organic matter in the sample BOD/COD ratio – the greater the ratio, the more oxidizable (biologically treatable) the waste. Ratios rarely exceed 0.8- 0.9.
    12. 12. Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Measure of WW pollution characteristics Based on the chemical formula Test methods use heat and oxygen, UV radiation, and/or chemical oxidants to convert organic carbon to carbon dioxide, which can then be measured Can be assessed in 5 to 10 minutes Theoretical > Measured
    13. 13. Theoretical OxygenDemand (ThOD) WW generally contains a mixture of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen Calculated using stoichiometric equations Considers both carbonaceous and nitrogenous oxygen demand  Main difference from COD
    14. 14. Methods ofTreatment
    15. 15. 1) Clarification, Sedimentation, Flocculation are used forsuspended and/ or colloidal pollutants2) Evaporation, Reverse Osmosis etc, are used fordissolved inorganic pollutants3) Oxidation/ Synthesis by Micro-organisms is carriedout (Biological Treatment) for Dissolved OrganicPollutant
    16. 16. Biological Processes... cell: derives energy from oxidation of reducedfood sources (carbohydrate, protein & fats) Requires…..  microbes with the ability to degrade the waste organics  contact time with the organics  favorable conditions for growth
    17. 17. Objective of BiologicalWastewater Treatment  To stabilize the organic matter (Soluble and none settleble)  To reduce the amount of dissolved phosphorus and nitrogen in the final effluent
    18. 18. Microorganisms
    19. 19.  Microorganisms = single-celled organism capable of performing all life functions independently Basic unit of life = cell Enzymes Cell Wall C, N, P Wastes H2 O H2 O O2 CO2
    20. 20. Typical animal cell: animal cell virus bacterial cell
    21. 21. Bacterial Cell
    22. 22. Type of microorganisms
    23. 23. Shape of Bacteria Cocci – spherical cells, often in chains or tetrads Rods – most common shape – vary in shape & size Spiral Rod – curved rods
    24. 24. Growth Growth = cell division one cell divides to produce two equal daughter cells Generation time length of time required for bacterial population to double
    25. 25. Bacterial Growth: cell division single cell cell elongates cell produces cell wall two daughter cells producedThe cell replicates all its components, reorganizes it into two cells, forms a cell wall, and separates.
    26. 26. Growth curve (typical phases ofgrowth) stationary phase cell count log phase death phase lag phase time
    27. 27. Composition of bacterial cell: Percentage by weight Carbon 50  Potassium 1 Oxygen 20  Sodium 1 Nitrogen 14  Calcium 0.5 Hydrogen 8  Magnesium 0.5 Phosphorus 3  Iron 0.2  All other elements 0.3 Sulfur 1 Cell Formula C60H84N12O24P
    28. 28. Requirements for BacterialGrowth  Nutritional ◦ Carbon source (waste to be degraded ) ◦ N & P (100:5:1;C:N:P) ◦ Trace minerals  Environmental ◦ Oxygen (terminal electron acceptor) ◦ Temperature ◦ Water ◦ pH ◦ Non-toxic
    29. 29. MicroorganismsClassification: Heterotrophic- obtain energy from oxidation of organic matter (organic Carbon) Autotrophic- obtain energy from oxidation of inorganic matter (CO2, NH4, H+ ) Phototrophic- obtain energy from sunlight
    30. 30. Biochemical EnvironmentsThree Major Ones  Aerobic - oxygen  Anoxic - nitrate  Anaerobic - strict and facultative
    31. 31. Biological Treatment In the case of domestic wastewater treatment, the objective of biological treatment is:  To stabilize the organic content  To remove nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus Types: Attached Growth Aerobic Processes Suspended Growth Anoxic Processes Combined Systems Anaerobic Processes Combined Aerobic-Anoxic- Anaerobic Processes Aerobic Pond Processes Maturation Facultative Anaerobic
    32. 32. Major Aerobic Biological Processes Type of Common Name Use Growth Suspended Activated Sludge (AS) Carbonaceous BOD removal (nitrification) Growth Aerated Lagoons Carbonaceous BOD removal (nitrification) Attached Trickling Filters Carbonaceous BOD removal. nitrification Growth Roughing Filters (trickling Carbonaceous BOD removal filters with high hydraulic loading rates) Rotating Biological Carbonaceous BOD removal (nitrification) Contactors Packed-bed reactors Carbonaceous BOD removal (nitrification) Combined Activated Biofilter Process Carbonaceous BOD removal (nitrification) Suspended & Trickling filter-solids contact Attached process Growth Biofilter-AS process Series trickling filter-AS process
    33. 33. CRemoval
    34. 34. Biological CarbonaceousRemoval aerobic - oxidation bacteria CHONS + O2 + Nutrients CO2 + NH3 + C5H7NO2 (organic matter) (new bacterial cells) + other end products - endogenous respiration bacteria C5H7NO2 + 5O2 5CO2 + 2H2O + NH3 + energy (cells)
    35. 35. NRemoval
    36. 36. What are the forms of nitrogen found inwastewater?  Forms of nitrogen: Organic N TKN Ammonia Total Nitrite N Nitrate
    37. 37. Why is it necessary to treat the formsof nitrogen?  Improve receiving stream quality  Increase chlorination efficiency  Minimize pH changes in plant  Increase suitability for reuse  Prevent NH toxicity 4  Protect groundwater from nitrate contamination  Increases aquatic growth (algae)  Increases DO depletion
    38. 38. How is N removed or altered bysecondary (biological) treatment?  Biological assimilation BUG = C60H86O23N12P  0.13 lb N/lb of bug mass  Biological conversion by nitrification and denitrification
    39. 39. Nitrification NH +  Nitrosomonas  NO2- 4 NO -  Nitrobacter  NO - 2 3 Notes:  Aerobic process  Control by SRT (4 + days)  Uses oxygen  1 mg of NH + uses 4.6 mg O 4 2  Depletes alkalinity  1 mg NH4+ consumes 7.14 mg alkalinity  Low oxygen and temperature = difficult to operate
    40. 40. Denitrification NO3-  denitrifiers (facultative bacteria)  N2 gas + CO2 gas Notes:  Anoxic process  Control by volume and oxic MLSS recycle to anoxic zone  N used as O2 source = 1 mg NO3- yields 2.85 mg O2 equivalent  Adds alkalinity  1 mg NO3- restores 3.57 mg alkalinity  High BOD and NO3- load and low temperature = difficult to operate
    41. 41. Biological Nitrogen Removal  Nitrification -energy Nitrosomonas NH4+ + 1.5 O2 NO2- + H2O + 2 H+ + (240-350 kJ) (1) Nitrobacter NO2- + 0.5 O2 NO3- + (65-90 kJ) (2) -assimilation Nitrosomonas 15 CO2 + 13 NH4+ 10 NO2- + 3 C5H7NO2 + 23 H+ +4 H2O (3) Nitrobacter 5 CO2 + NH4+ +10 NO2- +2 H2O 10 NO3- + C5H7NO2 + H+ (4) - overall reaction NH4+ +1.83 O2 + 1.98 H CO3- 0.021 C5H7NO2 + 0.98 NO3- + 1.04 1H2O + 1.88H2CO3
    42. 42. Biological Nitrogen Removal  factors affecting nitrification  temperature  substrate concentration  dissolved oxygen  pH  toxic and inhibitory substances  NH 4 − N   DO  0.095(T −15)µ = µm  ⋅ ( e )[1 − 0.83(7.2 − pH )]  K N + NH 4 − N   K O + DO 
    43. 43. Biological Nitrogen Removal  Denitrification  Nitrate is used instead of oxygen as terminal electron acceptor  Denitrifiers require reduced carbon source for energy and cell synthesis  Denitrifiers can use variety of organic carbon source - methanol, ethanol and acetic acid NO -3  → NO -2  → NO  → N 2 O  → N 2    NO -3 + 1.08CH 3OH + H +  → 0.065C5 H 7 O 2 N + 0.47N 2 + 0.76CO 2 + 2.44H 2 O 
    44. 44. Biological Nitrogen Removal factors affecting denitrification  temperature  dissolved oxygen  pH
    45. 45. Activated Sludge Process
    46. 46. Activated Sludge Process There are two phases to biological treatment ◦ “Mineralization” of the waste organics producing CO2 + H2O + microbes ◦ Separation of the microbes and water
    47. 47. Activated Sludge Process Q Q+R Q-W Aeration basin Clarifier Clarifier (OUT) (IN) (MLSS) R (RAS) W (WAS)
    48. 48. Definitions: (measurement & control )  MLSS / MLVSS ( active microbes )  F / M ( food to mass )  RAS / WAS ( recycle & waste )  MCRT ( sludge age )  DOUR / SOUR ( how active? )  SVI / SSV30 ( settleability)
    49. 49. MLSSMixed Liquor Suspended Solids The suspended solids in the totally mixed aeration basin liquid
    50. 50. MLVSSMixed Liquor Volatile Suspended Solids The part of MLSS which will combust.A good approximation of the active biological portion of the MLSS (75 - 85%) In a well oxidised sample, MLVSS = biomass
    51. 51. Food to Mass Ratio F + M + O2 M + CO2 +H2O F/M = kg /day BOD5 kg MLVSS Concept: Microorganisms work best with an optimum amount of food
    52. 52. Recycle (RAS) Recycle converts once-through system into Activated Sludge Clarifier separates solids (biomass), thickens and allows return of microorganisms (RAS) Recycle or clarifier underflow influences thickening and mass balances Retention Time of Biomass no longer limited by Hydraulic Retention time
    53. 53. Wasting (WAS)  Biomass is created as the microorganisms grow = Sludge Yield (kg/kg-deltaBOD)  Sludge Yield varies by type of waste and operating conditions (e.g. growth rate)  For Equilibrium conditions, Yield, or Excess Sludge must be removed or Wasted  Excess sludge can involve significant influent inert TSS
    54. 54. Sludge Age or MCRT  MCRT = Mean Cell Residence Time  System level, or Gross parameter  One definition is “average time biomass stays in the system”  Calculated by Total Solids in System / Total Solids being Wasted  Mathematically = 1/net growth rate
    55. 55. MCRT =[MLVSS (ppm) * Aeration Vol. (m3)] ___________________________________ [TSS(ppm) * Eff (m3/d)] + [RAS MLVSS (ppm) * WAS (m3/d)]or MCRT = Total Solids/ Wasted Solids In practice, MLSS usually used
    56. 56. Oxygen Uptake DOUR and SOUR or Respiration Rate (RR) can provide useful information on health of biomass compared to normal operation High F/M operation = high growth rate = High RR (e.g. 20+ mg/l/hr/g/VSS) Extended Aeration (“old” sludge) = Low F/M = “Low” RR (e.g. 3- 12 ) Do not confuse RR with total O2 demand
    57. 57. DOUR = (6.5-3.3)/(10-2) = 3.2/8 = 0.4 mg/l/min = 24 mg/l/hr SOUR-- Specific Oxygen Uptake Rate or DOUR/ppm MLVSS Oxygen Uptake Rate (DOUR) 10 8D.O. (mg/l) 6 4 2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Time (mins)
    58. 58. SOUR-- Why do it? Indicates the health of the bugs Can show if there is a toxin the basin Has been shown to be correlated to the final effluent COD so it can be used as an indication of the effluent quality during an upset or change in operating conditions.
    59. 59. SVI SVI = SSV30(ml) *1000 MLSS (mg/L)= Volume occupied by 1 gm of MLSS after 30 min ofsettling (usually 1 L sample) SSV30 = Sludge settled volume after 30 minutes in ml/L
    60. 60. SVI target 50 - 150 1000 ml Aeration MLSS Effluent Sludge Sludge Recycle
    61. 61. Information from Settling Tests (SVI) Graph of Rate of Settling = age of sludge Supernatant Condition = cloudy, ash, pin floc Production of Gas after 1- 2+ hr = denitrification Floating material, SVI = Filamentous Bulking Colour of Sludge e.g. brown or gray Shape of curve and Expected RAS concentration
    62. 62. Example of Settling Data 1200 1000 Young bugs - poor settling, potential for carryover 800 Normal Bugs, good settling CaseASSV (ml) 600 and good water quality CaseB CaseC 400 200 Old Bugs- fast settling, pin floc carryover potential 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 40 50 60 90 120 180 Time (mins)
    63. 63. Operational Parameters inActivated Sludge Process  Nature of substrate  F/M ratio  Dissolved Oxygen  RAS  Reactor Configuration  pH  Reaction kinetics  Reactor Hydraulics  Nutrients
    64. 64. Activated Sludge Process  Monitoring  Flows  Organic Concentrations and Loadings  Solids concentrations  Settleability data  Oxygen Dissolved oxygen (DO) in aeration basin DOUR (Dissolved oxygen uptake rate (mg/L/hr)

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