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Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
Romanticism
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Romanticism

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Romanticism

Romanticism

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  • 1. Introduction to Romanticism by Elliott Jones of Santa Ana College for Kaleidoscope Open Course Initiative shared under a Creative Commons Attribution License
  • 2. Classicism vs. Romanticism Classicism: order, poise, symmetry Classicism: views the world objectively Classicism: inspired by Greek architecture Romanticism: wonder, ecstasy, irregularity Romanticism: self- expression paramount Romanticism: nature and imagination
  • 3. The Romantic Sound Quest for emotion in music Love was favorite emotional theme – Unending desire for love – Search for the unattainable – A sense of yearning or longing Expressive terms in music – Dolente, con fuoco, misterioso, etc.
  • 4. Role of Music Music as art instead of mere entertainment Artist as a divine force for enlightenment Composing for the ages – “art for art’s sake” Concerts became more serious events More expected of music and listener – Music was longer, more complex – Listener expected transcendence
  • 5. Influence on Modern Ideals We continue to view music through the Romantic perspective – Our attitudes toward art and artists – Concert etiquette The idea of a “canon” of concert music – A core body of masterworks that are frequently performed and preserved These ideas all arose in 19th century
  • 6. Romantic Style More evolution than revolution Lyrical melody still dominates Melody: less rigid in structure Harmony: chromatic, dramatic, & dissonant Tempo: rubato became very common Form: grandiose large forms and concentrated character pieces
  • 7. Romantic Orchestra Wildly contrasting dynamic markings – pppp vs. ffff Industrial revolution brings changes – Flutes become metal w/fingering mechanism – Trumpet and French horn get valves New instruments added to orchestra – Tuba, English horn, harp Conductors necessary: leader & interpreter

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